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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

J. NICHOLAS, G.D. HOLT and M. MIHSEIN

Through the credit they furnish, materials suppliers provide a form of working capital for most construction contractors. This paper considers the implications of this for…

Abstract

Through the credit they furnish, materials suppliers provide a form of working capital for most construction contractors. This paper considers the implications of this for crediting organizations (i.e. suppliers). It is shown that a supplier's financial turnover movement (or lack of it) can be modelled and predicted with some accuracy by considering a number of characteristics of their credit control department. The models are developed from analysis of data obtained from a survey of 55 UK materials suppliers' credit control and debt collection procedures. The statistical technique of multivariate‐discriminant analysis (MDA) is used. Predictive accuracy of the models is tested on an independent, hold‐out sample of 10 suppliers' characteristics. It is found that ‘risk‐taking’ suppliers who protect themselves from bad debt by using insurance; suppliers who employ a third‐party organization to evaluate potential debtors' creditworthiness; and suppliers who service only one construction trade with materials, achieve significantly greater financial growth than those suppliers who do not exhibit these characteristics.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

David J. Edwards, Ruel R. Cabahug and John Nicholas

Hiring, selecting or assessing plant operatives' proficiency in the UK construction industry is an increasingly difficult task. A number of plant operator certification…

Abstract

Hiring, selecting or assessing plant operatives' proficiency in the UK construction industry is an increasingly difficult task. A number of plant operator certification schemes are available to practitioners and each scheme trains to a myriad of bespoke standards. Consequently, the decision to employ a candidate often rests upon the employer's intuition and judgement and creates an unnecessary dilemma. To address this aforementioned problem, findings of research work that modelled plant operators' maintenance proficiency is presented. A UK nationwide survey was conducted to elicit plant professional opinion on what ‘training and educational’ (T&E) attributes constitute ‘good’ operator proficiency. The data was then arranged into three categories of operator maintenance proficiency: good, average and poor Multivariate Discriminant Analysis (MDA) was used on 75 percent of a simulated data set. The model utilised five T&E attributes, namely: duration of training provided, operator holder of alternative training card (not Certificate of Training Achievement (CTA) or Scottish/National Vocational Qualifications (S/NVQ)), operator's oral communication skills, operator's planning skills and operator's mechanical knowledge. Performance analysis revealed that model classification accuracy was 89.10 percent. The remaining 25 percent hold out sample was then modelled for validation purposes using the derived MDA model. Accuracy of the sub‐sample model was high at 77.60 percent whilst a paired sample T‐tests for the 75 percent and 25 percent sample data established that there was no significant statistical difference between actual and predicted classifications. Future work is proposed that aims to model other factors that influence operator maintenance proficiency; namely, work situational, motivational management and personal factors.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Nicholas J. Jardine

Briefly outlines main objectives of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) research programme Food Acceptability and Choice. Looks at the project portfolio…

Abstract

Briefly outlines main objectives of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) research programme Food Acceptability and Choice. Looks at the project portfolio and lists recent, current and future research topics by author. Concludes by listing relevant literature from the MAFF programme.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Lisa Wood, Nicholas J.R. Wood, Shannen Vallesi, Amanda Stafford, Andrew Davies and Craig Cumming

Homelessness is a colossal issue, precipitated by a wide array of social determinants, and mirrored in substantial health disparities and a revolving hospital door…

Abstract

Purpose

Homelessness is a colossal issue, precipitated by a wide array of social determinants, and mirrored in substantial health disparities and a revolving hospital door. Connecting people to safe and secure housing needs to be part of the health system response. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods paper presents emerging findings from the collaboration between an inner city hospital, a specialist homeless medicine GP service and Western Australia’s inaugural Housing First collective impact project (50 Lives 50 Homes) in Perth. This paper draws on data from hospitals, homelessness community services and general practice.

Findings

This collaboration has facilitated hospital identification and referral of vulnerable rough sleepers to the Housing First project, and connected those housed to a GP and after hours nursing support. For a cohort (n=44) housed now for at least 12 months, significant reductions in hospital use and associated costs were observed.

Research limitations/implications

While the observed reductions in hospital use in the year following housing are based on a small cohort, this data and the case studies presented demonstrate the power of care coordinated across hospital and community in this complex cohort.

Practical implications

This model of collaboration between a hospital and a Housing First project can not only improve discharge outcomes and re-admission in the shorter term, but can also contribute to ending homelessness which is itself, a social determinant of poor health.

Originality/value

Coordinated care between hospitals and programmes to house people who are homeless can significantly reduce hospital use and healthcare costs, and provides hospitals with the opportunity to contribute to more systemic solutions to ending homelessness.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2020

Nicholas J. Ashill, Rania W. Semaan, Tanya Gibbs and Aaron Gazley

Despite major market-orientated reforms to enhance the competitive advantage of Russian domestic firms, the antecedents and consequences of frontline employee (FLE…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite major market-orientated reforms to enhance the competitive advantage of Russian domestic firms, the antecedents and consequences of frontline employee (FLE) customer orientation (CO) remain poorly understood. Acknowledging this paucity of research, the authors draw upon a hierarchical model of personality to examine personality trait determinants of CO and job performance in the context of the Russian financial services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 186 FLEs using a self-administered survey questionnaire and analyzed using AMOS.

Findings

The results identify which basic personality traits matter in translating FLE CO behavior into higher job performance in the Russian retail-banking sector.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the generalizability of the findings within one organizational context. Future research should examine whether the found associations hold true for FLEs working in other service sectors in other parts of the country.

Practical implications

Study findings differ significantly to Western-based research and provide valuable insight into the process that motivates Russian FLEs in a commercial retail setting to perform better in their jobs.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that employs a hierarchical model of the effects of basic personality traits on FLE CO and job performance in a former socialist/communist economy. We also advance existing research on FLE CO by distinguishing between two types of CO behavior. Findings provide an understanding of those personality traits that affect the ability of Russian FLEs to better satisfy customer needs and to interact and serve customers in an enjoyable way.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze learning assurance measures derived from a business simulation as part of capstone business strategy courses delivered via distance learning (DL) compared to traditional classroom (on-ground [OG]) delivery modes using experiential learning theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period in a medium-sized private master’s level college is investigated. Variables included learning assurance measures from a competitive online simulation (GLO-BUS), gender, business degree major, capstone course grades and cumulative grade point averages. The analytic strategy included correlations, linear regressions, multiple regressions and multivariate analyses of variance.

Findings

Results reveal that there are significant differences in learning assurance report (LAR) scores, gender differences and differences between academic majors based on delivery mode (OG versus DL). Simulation performance was higher for DL students, although the relationship between simulation performance and final course grades was not significantly different for OG and DL cohorts.

Research limitations/implications

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, implications for courses, programs, curricula and learning assessment are considered. The strengths (actual performance measures) and potential limitations (e.g. possible deficiency of measures) of LAR scores are discussed.

Originality/value

This research compares OG and DL modes for strategic management course outcomes using direct assessments, including simulation learning assurance measures, student characteristics, capstone course grades and student grade point averages.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider assurance of learning among undergraduate business students enrolled in capstone business strategy courses using the GLO-BUS competitive simulation. Gender, academic major and business core course performance were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 595 undergraduate capstone business students from 21 course sections taught over a four-year period. Variables included learning assurance measures, simulation performance, gender, major, business core course grades, capstone course grade and cumulative grade point average. Correlations, linear regression, multiple regression and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Learning assurance report scores were strongly related to simulation performance. Simulation performance was related to capstone course grade, which, in turn, was significantly related to the grade point average (GPA). Core business courses were related to learning assurance and performance indicators. Significant differences for gender and degree major were found for academic performance measures. Women and men did not differ in simulation performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of one simulation (GLO-BUS) and studying students at one university taught by one professor. Assurance of learning measures needs further study as factors in business program evaluation. Future research should analyze post-graduate performance and career achievements in relation to assurance of learning outcomes.

Originality/value

This study conducts empirical analyses of simulation learning that focuses entirely on direct measures, including student characteristics (gender, major), learning assurance measures, business core course grades, capstone course grades and student GPAs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Jeffrey W. Alstete, John P. Meyer and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to utilize an exploratory multiple-case design research method using three undergraduate management courses at a medium-sized private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to utilize an exploratory multiple-case design research method using three undergraduate management courses at a medium-sized private comprehensive college near a large metropolitan area in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores differentiated instruction in relation to experiential learning in management education by examining three teaching applications from different management courses to illustrate these concepts.

Findings

The use of differentiated instruction in management education is supported through varied approaches such as individual student and team-based scaffolding that demonstrate the applicability of differentiation. In addition to improving student learning, other benefits include improved student retention and faculty autonomy in course creation and delivery. The implementation involves a proactive response to learner needs informed by a faculty perspective that recognizes student diversity yet retains quality assurance standards with mindful assessment and planning.

Research limitations/implications

The comparatively small number of courses and instructional methods may make the specific findings and examples more relevant to the type of institution examined. Yet, the general conclusions and methods identified have potential implications for learners in a wide variety of colleges and universities.

Practical implications

Differentiated instruction may be a useful approach for enhancing learning in heterogenous groups of students by recognizing student readiness and making appropriate modifications.

Originality/value

This paper offers an exploratory overview of differentiated instruction with guidance for management faculty members in designing and implementing these approaches in their courses.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Jeffrey W. Alstete and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this paper is to focus on connecting recent conceptualizations of learning space design in management education by examining interior building and classroom design.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on connecting recent conceptualizations of learning space design in management education by examining interior building and classroom design.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used mixed methods research: external benchmarking with same industry institutions (n=5) and two surveys of students (n=131) and faculty members (n=38).

Findings

The process helped to envision how a business school could improve by adapting design aspects from industry peers, understanding the needs of students and faculty, and incorporating new teaching methods and instructional technologies to inform learning space solutions.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of external benchmarking partners may make the findings more applicable to the institutional type examined. Yet, the findings and the mixed methods research have implications for learning space design more broadly.

Practical implications

With the business school building boom, the external architecture of new buildings appears to garner much of the attention. However, the researchers believe that the real impact of new business schools is the centrality of interior learning space design and technology.

Originality/value

This paper uses a mixed methods research approach to examine learning space theory and research in relation to a particular business school’s efforts to use this knowledge to design learning spaces in a new building.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Nicholas J. Beutell, Jeffrey W. Alstete, Joy A. Schneer and Camille Hutt

The purpose of this paper is to test a model predicting self-employment (SE) personal growth (learning opportunities and creativity) and SE exit intentions (exiting to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a model predicting self-employment (SE) personal growth (learning opportunities and creativity) and SE exit intentions (exiting to work for someone else and exit likelihood) based on the job demands-resources model.

Design/methodology/approach

SEM was used to examine SE demands and resources, strain, and engagement predicting growth, exit intentions, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction. SE type (owners with employees and independent owners without employees) was a moderator variable. Data were analyzed from a national probability sample (n=464 self-employed respondents for whom SE was their primary work involvement), the National Study of the Changing Workforce.

Findings

Overall support for the model was found. Work–family conflict (demand) and work–family synergy (resource) had the strongest relationships with strain and engagement. Strain was positively related to both growth and exit intentions while engagement was inversely related to exit intentions but positively related to growth. The model was significantly different for business owners and independently self-employed.

Practical implications

These results provide guidance to researchers and educators regarding the challenges of self- employment engagement and strain with implications for selecting business types that minimize exit likelihood while maximizing work engagement and personal growth potential.

Originality/value

This study breaks new ground by testing a structural model of engagement and growth for self-employed individuals while also investigating two types of exit intentions. The authors report findings for growth and exit decisions that have received scant attention in the literature to date. Type of SE was a significant variable.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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