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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Debra F. Cannon

Continual quality improvement is crucial to competitive success. A systems approach is vital in encompassing every segment of the hospitality organization in striving for…

Abstract

Continual quality improvement is crucial to competitive success. A systems approach is vital in encompassing every segment of the hospitality organization in striving for service quality. The focus of this article is on employees as internal customers and the critical role this group plays in the delivery of quality results. The article will discuss the theoretical foundations for the concept of “internal customers.” Research will be reviewed that has linked service quality between internal and external customers. The necessity of integrating service to “internal customers” into an organization’s culture is also explained. Examples from leading hospitality companies are presented that reinforce the concept of “internal customer” from the pre‐hire stage to other career stages.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Bristol Voss

As a rule, business books published today are backing off from lectures and theories, and are instead featuring more situation‐oriented illustrations of the basic concepts…

Abstract

As a rule, business books published today are backing off from lectures and theories, and are instead featuring more situation‐oriented illustrations of the basic concepts everyone already recognizes as right. What better place to get these anecdotes than from the horses' mouths? This batch gathers together the personal stories of top American business leaders, circa the late‐1990s, as told by themselves—with a little help from professional writers. The autobiographies represent hardcore, old‐fashioned industry (Lockheed), innovative industry (Nucor), service (Marriott), retail (Starbucks), and real estate/empire building (Trump).

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Rajshekhar (Raj) G. Javalgi, Thomas W. Whipple, Amit K. Ghosh and Robert B. Young

This article proposes investigating implications for service providers who adopt a market orientation. It hopes to extend current thinking by integrating market…

Abstract

Purpose

This article proposes investigating implications for service providers who adopt a market orientation. It hopes to extend current thinking by integrating market orientation and market‐focused strategic flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is extended to apply to services marketing. The “strategic wheel of service performance” provides a framework to discuss the managerial implications from integration of market orientation, strategic flexibility, competitive advantage, and service performance.

Findings

The impact of developing a market orientation should be higher levels of customer relationship marketing (CRM), retention, satisfaction, loyalty, and lifetime value (LTV). Increases in one or more of these interrelated variables should help service providers improve their judgmental and objective performance.

Research limitations/implications

More research needs to be conducted to expand the market orientation philosophy to the service provider. Subjecting the framework to analytic rigor would allow scholars and practitioners to understand more fully the inter‐relatedness of the service implications.

Practical implications

Practice implications of the paper are: the service economy is an opportunity to practice market orientation; investments in customer profitability, retention, and loyalty programs pay dividends; A market orientation enhances financial and strategic performance; integration of principles across organizational boundaries requires a long time; financial and strategic business performance criteria need to be quantified; cross‐functional customer feedback mechanisms need to be designed; and market orientation must be integrated across all service function providers.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework integrates market orientation, market‐focused strategic flexibility, strategic competitive advantage, and subjective and objective performance outcomes as applied to service providers. The discussion strengthens the strategic value of market orientation and provides managerial implications for the services sector.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Robert W. Rogers

Examines how senior leaders in organizations can foster trustthrough business competence and people orientation. However, frontlineleaders need to apply five fundamental…

Abstract

Examines how senior leaders in organizations can foster trust through business competence and people orientation. However, frontline leaders need to apply five fundamental strategies consistently to prevent senior leader efforts from being wasted. Also examines the place of trust in teams and how trust can be gained once it is broken.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Amanda Wheeler, Amary Mey, Fiona Kelly, Laetitia Hattingh and Andrew K. Davey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential approaches to continuing education and training delivery for community pharmacists to equip them to support mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential approaches to continuing education and training delivery for community pharmacists to equip them to support mental health consumers and carers with illnesses such as depression and anxiety.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of national and international literature about community pharmacists’ roles, beliefs and attitudes towards mental health, continuing education delivery for the workforce and training recommendations to equip pharmacy workforce.

Findings

Training involving consumer educators was effective in reducing stigma and negative attitudes. Interactive and contextually relevant training appeared to be more effective than didactic strategies. Narratives and role-plays (from the perspective of consumers, carers and health professionals) are effective in promoting more positive attitudes and reduce stigma. Flexible on-line delivery methods with video footage of expert and consumer narratives were preferable for a cost-effective programme accessible to a wide community pharmacy workforce.

Originality/value

There is a clear need for mental health education for community pharmacists and support staff in Australia. Training should target reducing stigma and negative attitudes, improving knowledge and building confidence and skills to improve pharmacy staff's perceived value of working with mental health consumers. The delivery mode should maximise uptake.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Hernan Eduardo Riquelme, Rosa E. Rios and Akram S. Gadallah

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to test the direct influence of servant leadership (SL) on an organization’s serving-driven capabilities (S-DC). Second, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to test the direct influence of servant leadership (SL) on an organization’s serving-driven capabilities (S-DC). Second, to test the indirect effect of SL on employee customer-service behaviors and identification with their branch. Third, to determine the direct effect of an organization’s S-DC on employee customer-service behaviors and identification with the branch. Thus, the authors provide evidence of how SL influence serving-driven interaction capabilities that are later deployed to execute customer-oriented behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from a sample of 36 bank branches of one bank in the Middle East. Employees evaluated their manager’s SL behaviors, the six S-DC and their identification with the organization. In turn, managers assessed their employees on customer-service behaviors. Partial least squares path analysis was used to model the relationships.

Findings

Results indicate servant leaders’ behaviors are example, motivator and determinant of an organization’s S-DC. Employees not only adopt the S-DC by imitation but also as a mean to reciprocate the leader: serve your customers like the leader serves you. Other results and implications for managers are presented.

Research limitations/implications

The study is of a cross-sectional nature therefore a causal effect of SL on S-DC cannot be determined. Second, the study is limited to one bank although several branches were randomly sampled. Third, the evaluations of the S-DC have been done by the employees rather than customers.

Practical implications

The S-DC concept provides ample opportunities for managers to enhance their interactions with employees and customers to improve their performance by identifying which capabilities to develop. Specifically, interactions that promote ethical, empowering, developmental relationships and that encourage genuine two-way communication and responds to individual needs.

Originality/value

The study is original in testing the mediating effect of a S-DC. The focus on individual and organizational capabilities is relevant because they have been touted as among the most important factors to explain the differences of company performances and competitive advantages

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

John Kitching

The purpose of this paper is to theorise, and demonstrate empirically, how regulation generates indirect impacts on small companies that arise through the medium of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to theorise, and demonstrate empirically, how regulation generates indirect impacts on small companies that arise through the medium of relationships with stakeholders whose actions affect them. Specifically, the paper explores how relations with stakeholders shape the process of small company adaptation to statutory financial reporting obligations.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis draws principally on qualitative interview data from small company preparers of abbreviated accounts and their accountants, but also uses survey data to demonstrate the prevalence of the account filing and advisory practices reported in interview.

Findings

Small companies’ relations with accountants mediate the influence of financial reporting regulation by shaping how firms discover, interpret and adapt to their statutory obligations. Where accountants inform small companies of the option to file abbreviated accounts, or advise them to file such accounts, and clients act on that advice, then relations with accountants mediate the impact of regulation on that business. Accountants typically advise small company clients to file abbreviated accounts as the “default position”, one departed from only in very specific circumstances. Accountants are complicit, therefore, inadvertently or otherwise, in the production of the effects of clients’ filing decisions.

Originality/value

The study expands the conception of how regulation contributes to entrepreneurial action by focusing on the indirect effects arising for small firms via their relations with the stakeholders with whom they interact. Regulatory regimes are a condition of all forms of entrepreneurial action and the ensuing performance outcomes. Regulation therefore exerts a ubiquitous influence on entrepreneurial action that is substantial, pervasive and enduring. Without reference to the necessary enabling functions of regulation, explanations of entrepreneurial processes remain incomplete.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Elaine Aparecida Regiani de Campos, Istefani Carisio de Paula, Regina Negri Pagani and Patricia Guarnieri

The aim of this paper is to develop a systematic literature review (SLR) aiming to identify reverse logistics (RL) concepts and practices applied to the end-of-life (EOL…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop a systematic literature review (SLR) aiming to identify reverse logistics (RL) concepts and practices applied to the end-of-life (EOL) and end-of-use (EOU) of pharmaceuticals and to identify and synthesize, through bibliometric indicators, research opportunities on RL, considering the analysis of publications in the periodical Supply Chain Management: An International Journal (SCMij).

Design/methodology/approach

The SLR followed two steps, namely, search for articles on the subject and content analysis of selected material and bibliometric analysis of publications using VOSviewer®.

Findings

The SLR allowed the compilation of evidences regarding pharmaceutical RL in the groups: environmental risk, the RL evolution and regulatory and stakeholder’s educational perspective. Despite the timid specific literature on pharmaceutical RL, it was also possible to point out research gaps and opportunities. Pharmaceutical RL seems to be influenced by studies from traditional RL including mathematical modeling, managerial strategies and technologies but prescind of a systemic solution. Besides reducing environmental impact, the motivation to implement pharmaceutical RL resides in its potential for revenue. Considering integrated logistics as a trend and an emerging issue, RL for the pharmaceutical industry needs to be addressed more thorough and broadly.

Research limitations/implications

The limited number of papers returned in this SLR of pharmaceutical RL impaired the bibliometric analysis of them, leading to the inclusion of papers on general RL.

Originality/value

This study provides an overview of the evolution of RL in the pharmaceutical industry, it also clarifies concepts and EOL/EOU practices, particularly directed to the pharmaceutical industry RL.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Ying Xie and Liz Breen

– The purpose of this paper is to determine how best to reduce, reuse and dispose of household waste medicines in the National Health Service (NHS) (UK).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how best to reduce, reuse and dispose of household waste medicines in the National Health Service (NHS) (UK).

Design/methodology/approach

Through a combination of literature review and empirical work, this research investigates the existing household waste medicines reverse logistics (RL) system and makes recommendations for improvement by benchmarking it against household waste batteries RL. The viability and feasibility of these recommendations are evaluated through in-depth interviews with healthcare professionals and end user surveys.

Findings

The batteries RL system appears to be a more structured and effective system with more active engagement from actors/stakeholders in instigating RL practices and for this very reason is an excellent comparator for waste medicines RL practices. Appropriate best practices are recommended to be incorporated into the waste medicines RL system, including recapturing product value, revised processing approaches, system cooperation and enforcement, drivers and motivations and system design and facilitation.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers academics and professionals an improved insight into the current household waste medicines RL system and provides a step towards reducing an existing gap in this under-researched area. A limitation is that only a small sample of healthcare professionals were involved in subjectively evaluating the feasibility of the recommendations, so the applicability of the recommendations needs to be tested in a wider context and the cost effectiveness of implementing the recommendations needs to be analysed.

Practical implications

Reducing, reusing and properly disposing of waste medicines contribute to economic sustainability, environmental protection and personal and community safety. The information retrieved from analysing returned medicines can be used to inform prescribing practice so as to reduce unnecessary medicine waste and meet the medicine optimisation agenda.

Originality/value

This paper advocates learning from best practices in batteries RL to improve the waste medicines RL design and execution and supports the current NHS agenda on medicine waste reduction (DoH, 2012). The recommendations made in the paper not only aim to reduce medicine waste but also to use medicines effectively, placing the emphasis on improving health outcomes.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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