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1 – 10 of 30
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Hossein Derakhshanfar, J. Jorge Ochoa, Konstantinos Kirytopoulos, Wolfgang Mayer and Craig Langston

The purpose of this research is to identify the most impactful delay risks in Australian construction projects, including the associations amongst those risks as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify the most impactful delay risks in Australian construction projects, including the associations amongst those risks as well as the project phases in which they are most likely present. The correlation between project and organisational characteristics with the impact of delay risks was also studied.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from 118 delayed construction projects in Australia. Data were analysed to rank the most impactful delay risks, their correlation to project and organisational characteristics and project phases where those risks are likely to emerge. Association rule learning was used to capture associations between the delay risks.

Findings

The top five most impactful delay risks in Australia were changes by the owner, slow decisions by the owner, preparation and approval of design drawings, underestimation of project complexity and unrealistic duration imposed to the project, respectively. There is a set of delay risks that are mutually associated with project complexity. In addition, while delay risks associated with resources most likely arise in the execution phase, stakeholder and process-related risks are more smoothly distributed along all the project phases.

Originality/value

This research for the first time investigated the impact of delay risks, associations amongst them and project phases in which they are likely to happen in the Australian context. Also, this research for the first time sheds light on the project phases for the individual project delay risks which aids the project managers to understand where to focus on during each phase of the project.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

M.K.C.S. Wijewickrama, Nicholas Chileshe, Raufdeen Rameezdeen and J. Jorge Ochoa

The purpose of this paper is twofold: firstly, to identify the information-centric strategies of external stakeholders that influence the quality assurance (QA) in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: firstly, to identify the information-centric strategies of external stakeholders that influence the quality assurance (QA) in the reverse logistics supply chains (RLSC) of demolition waste (DW) and, secondly, to recognize the determinants for using each strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 professionals representing five external stakeholder groups: state and local government agencies, non-government organizations (NGOs), forward supply chain upstream and downstream actors. The data was analyzed based on Creswell's five-step process, and the conventional content analysis was used for coding and generating themes.

Findings

The study found seven information-centric influence strategies: regulating, monitoring, leading, incentivizing, demolition approval, forming contracts and specifications. The state government organizations were the most dominant in influencing the QA in RLSC. All external stakeholders use both aggressive and cooperative strategies. The urgent, legitimate and economic core of the issue decides the type of strategy to exert an information-centric influence over the QA in RLSC of DW.

Originality/value

To the author's best knowledge, this study is one of the first investigations performed based on a theoretical basis within the context of RLSC in the construction industry (CI). This study used empirical data to elaborate the stakeholder theory while providing new knowledge on stakeholder influence, particularly those relevant to information sharing. Thus, this study developed a theoretical base that future researchers in the study domain could use.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Hossein Derakhshanfar, J. Jorge Ochoa, Konstantinos Kirytopoulos, Wolfgang Mayer and Vivian W.Y. Tam

The purpose of this paper is to systematically develop a delay risk terminology and taxonomy. This research also explores two external and internal dimensions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically develop a delay risk terminology and taxonomy. This research also explores two external and internal dimensions of the taxonomy to determine how much the taxonomy as a whole or combinations of its elements are generalisable.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mixed methods research, this systematic literature review incorporated data from 46 articles to establish delay risk terminology and taxonomy. Qualitative data of the top 10 delay risks identified in each article were coded based on the grounded theory and constant comparative analysis using a three-stage coding approach. Word frequency analysis and cross-tabulation were used to develop the terminology and taxonomy. Association rules within the taxonomy were also explored to define risk paths and to unmask associations among the risks.

Findings

In total, 26 delay risks were identified and grouped into ten categories to form the risk breakdown structure. The universal delay risks and other delay risks that are more or less depending on the project location were determined. Also, it is realized that delays connected to equipment, sub-contractors and design drawings are highly connected to project planning, finance and owner slow decision making, respectively.

Originality/value

The established terminology and taxonomy may be used in manual or automated risk management systems as a baseline for delay risk identification, management and communication. In addition, the association rules assist the risk management process by enabling mitigation of a combination of risks together.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Sylvia Odusanya, J. Jorge Ochoa, Nicholas Chileshe and Seungjun Ahn

The purpose of this paper is to provide a holistic view of the link between the identification of complexity contributing factors, the application of project management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a holistic view of the link between the identification of complexity contributing factors, the application of project management approaches and their impacts on the performance of Information Technology (IT)-enabled change projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach of an embedded single-case design comprising three IT-enabled change projects delivered in Australia was used to explore the impact of complexity contributing factors and project management approaches on project performance measures. Semi-structured interviews were used as the main data collection method. Thematic analysis was used as the data analysis approach.

Findings

The results from the thematic analysis highlight that complexity contributing factors are related to two categories of complexity defined in this paper: technical uncertainties and uncertainty in goals and deliverables, both have an impact on the performance of IT-enabled change projects. It also highlights key project management approaches such as the use of an adaptive management approach and good communication as key to managing complexity. It also identifies a misalignment between stakeholder perception of success and the project management success measure for complex IT-enabled projects.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on data collected from Australian participants involved in three case studies. Additional data collection and reviews from practitioners in the field of project management could further refine and improve this research.

Practical implications

The research facilitates the identification of specific complexity contributing factors at the early stage of a project to ensure that the appropriate project management approaches and success measures are used.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to rethinking the pathways towards improving project performance in the IT sector by expanding the identification of project complexity to understanding how complexity and the management approaches impact project performance.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke, Seyi Segun Stephen, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Deji Rufus Ogunsemi and Isaac Olaniyi Aje

The enhancement of cities can be affirmed when there is a transformation in the functions it is used to perform to ones that are just experienced in all newness and…

Abstract

The enhancement of cities can be affirmed when there is a transformation in the functions it is used to perform to ones that are just experienced in all newness and effectiveness. A city enhanced in all smartness and dimensions can always perform better when quality of life is targeted during and after a designed project. These dimensions come in the form of smart economy, smart transportation, smart environment, smart individual, smart living and good governance. Other aspects of the chapter include cities and smart cities, formation of smart cities, idea of smart city and barriers to smart city development. All these work together to function together in understanding and maintaining a regulated smart city supply chain in the construction industry.

Details

Smart Cities: A Panacea for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-455-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke, Seyi Segun Stephen, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Deji Rufus Ogunsemi and Isaac Olaniyi Aje

The smart city process encompasses many features. The two chapters before this has succinctly introduced the concepts and some parts that relate to smart city. The process…

Abstract

The smart city process encompasses many features. The two chapters before this has succinctly introduced the concepts and some parts that relate to smart city. The process in implementation is dissected in this section of the book. It starts from the conceptualisation of the process to further definitions of the subject. Also, traits attributed to smart cities are explained in smart environment, economy, governance, living, people and mobility. Urbanisation brings along with it several features and terminologies. One of which is smartisation fused into the smart city process. The smartisation of the city system aim to bring developments in making the city wireless and developing smart families at the same time. Also, there are smart general administrations and improvement of social administrations, development of smart transportation, improvement of smart medicinal treatment, develop-ment of smart city administration, development of green city, and development of smart vacationer focus. Other smart city processes include the drivers, barriers, and benefits.

Details

Smart Cities: A Panacea for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-455-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Neha Chhabra Roy and N.G. Roy

The study aims to identify the severe socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological impacts caused by the construction of mega and large hydro-power plants in Uttarakhand…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to identify the severe socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological impacts caused by the construction of mega and large hydro-power plants in Uttarakhand, India. In addition to identifying the attributes, the study creates an integrated index that will assist in the development of sustainable hydro-power.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used for this impact identification was based on extensive literature review, focused expert discussions and further validation through a primary survey among the stakeholders in the hydropower sector. The sustainability index (SI) was estimated using the fuzzy logic theory.

Findings

The study area SI shows that few projects are in extreme zones, and through suggestive measures, few project sites can be made viable for long-term sustainable project site. A Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol–based conceptual model is also proposed for mitigation of impacts.

Originality/value

Hydropower plays an essential role in access to cleaner and cheaper sources of energy; it defines the usage of water resources toward inflation-free green energy and holds spectacular operational flexibility. Despite the significant advantages associated with hydroelectric power projects, there are adverse side effects as well. The water-based power sector industry contributes to any nation through both economic and environmental ways. Although one-third of the power business in India is carried out through water-based hydropower projects, recent trends in water-based hydropower projects show significant socioeconomic and environmental impacts that create a debate about the sustainability of these projects.

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2019

Raufdeen Rameezdeen, Jian Zuo, Jorge Ochoa Paniagua, Anthony Wood and Phuong Do

A green lease incorporates sustainability practices to reduce a building’s negative impact on the environment. Facilities managers play an important role in ensuring these…

Abstract

Purpose

A green lease incorporates sustainability practices to reduce a building’s negative impact on the environment. Facilities managers play an important role in ensuring these best practices are implemented during the operational stage of a building; however, green leasing is an under-researched area in the emerging field of sustainable facilities management (SFM). This paper aims to investigate the common barriers encountered in ensuring environmental performance when a green lease agreement is in operation between a landlord and tenant.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted in three stages using the principal-agent problem as the theoretical foundation for data collection. Stages 1 and 2 used semi-structured interviews to collect data with policy/corporate-level professionals, landlord and facilities management representatives who have considerable experience in green leases. Stage 3 used document reviews based on summative content analysis to further evaluate the extent of the contextual use of green leasing concepts as used within the facilities management community.

Findings

The study confirmed a strong incentive gap and information asymmetry between the landlord and facilities manager, forming a typical double principal-agent problem when the split incentives between the landlord and tenants are also taken into consideration, which results in agents acting on their own self-interest rather than the interests of the principal. Goal alignment is found to be key for the successful operation and management of a building throughout its life; when present, these goal conflicts can lead to disharmony between the parties to the contract.

Research limitations/implications

The study proposes a few practical measures to close the gaps in incentive and information asymmetry that create the principal-agent problem, while providing recommendations to the facilities management professional community. These recommendations could be included in future revisions of the SFM guidelines or code of practices used by the industry. Although this study exposed a rather neglected area of the facilities manager’s role in green leases, the findings are limited by the relatively small sample size used for the interviews.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the SFM body of knowledge from a green lease perspective, and the theoretical framework in the double principal-agent problem introduced in the study could be used in future research endeavours.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2022

Neha Chhabra Roy and N.G. Roy

This study aims to identify and gauge the sustainability indicators (SUSIs) for sustainable Hydroelectric Power (HEP) project development. It examines major SUSIs under…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and gauge the sustainability indicators (SUSIs) for sustainable Hydroelectric Power (HEP) project development. It examines major SUSIs under the social, economic and environmental (SEE) fronts and categorizes them under push and pull impacts which helps to identify challenges and opportunities associated with projects. Additionally, the study calculates an empirical sustainability index (SI) to assess the sustainability level of HEP. Finally, the study suggests mitigation measures across stakeholders, which will optimize government/developer/investor investments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the interaction of sustainable HEP development with SUSIs using Uttarakhand as a study area. Additionally, SI has been developed quantitatively. For the indicator classification, the authors conducted a literature review and secondary survey of all affected parties, including investors, developers, NGOs and villagers. The fuzzy logic theory (FLT) is used to determine the SI of the study area and classify projects in their level of sustainability. On the basis of expert opinion and literature review, mitigation measures are proposed across stakeholders.

Findings

The authors found that there is a mixed effect of SUSIs on HEP development across various projects in Uttarakhand. Furthermore, the authors suggest that index-based assessment and planned collaboration play a significant role in sustainable HEP development. Mitigation measures should be suggested to all affected stakeholders based on specific project issues, i.e. collaborations, training, public awareness campaigns, and initiatives by the government that would improve sustainability conditions.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to supporting the ongoing and upcoming initiatives launched by the Government of India, including the Green Energy Corridor, independent power producers (IPPs); and the India-Renewable Resources Development Project with IDA and participates in Net zero target.

Practical implications

The structured, sustainable HEP planning suggested in the study will help to conserve society, economy, save resources and in parallel reduce the cost and time of developers and policymakers. This will also help to improve the socioeconomic status of the villagers and prolong the life of the project.

Originality/value

The innovative SI-based push-pull approach identifies a sustainable HEP project planning.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Vasiliki Maria Panatsa and Georgios Malandrakis

This study aims to detect preschool and primary school student–teachers’ (STs) views about the social pillar of urban sustainability and particularly about the importance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to detect preschool and primary school student–teachers’ (STs) views about the social pillar of urban sustainability and particularly about the importance they attach to various social aspects of urban sustainability, and the perceived effectiveness of education in influencing these aspects.

Design/methodology/approach

A custom-designed questionnaire comprising eight literature-based social aspects of urban sustainability was developed and administered to 207 STs during the spring semester of 2015-2016, in the school of education, of a university located in northern Greece.

Findings

The highest levels of importance were attached to the aspect of “Health”, whereas aspects related to “Policy and Governance” were considered as the least important of all social aspects of urban sustainability. The aspect considered most easily influenced through education was that of “Human Relations”, in contrast to the aspect of “Housing” in which education was considered as the least effective. Also, STs considered every aspect of social urban sustainability to be more important than able to be influenced by education, revealing that they are somewhat sceptical of the effectiveness of education in this field.

Research limitations/implications

The participation of only student-teachers and the use of quantitative research tools are among the main limitation of the study. Future research should include teachers, both in-service and pre-service, from various disciplines and educational levels, and should employ a combination of quantitative with qualitative methods of analysis.

Practical implications

Insight into STs’ views can serve as a useful guidance for teacher education programs, providing information about necessary actions that have to be taken for the improvement of both pre- and in-service teacher educations.

Originality/value

There is a great lack of research around pre- and in-service teachers’ views about the importance of sustainability and the role of education in influencing it. Existing research is further scarcer when it comes to the investigation of the social pillar of urban sustainability, as literature usually focuses either on the environmental pillar of sustainability or on the concept of sustainable development in general.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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