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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Yuan Ping, Haiyan Su, Jianping Zhao and Xinlong Feng

This paper aims to propose two parallel two-step finite element algorithms based on fully overlapping domain decomposition for solving the 2D/3D time-dependent natural…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose two parallel two-step finite element algorithms based on fully overlapping domain decomposition for solving the 2D/3D time-dependent natural convection problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The first-order implicit Euler formula and second-order Crank–Nicolson formula are used to time discretization respectively. Each processor of the algorithms computes a stabilized solution in its own global composite mesh in parallel. These algorithms compute a nonlinear system for the velocity, pressure and temperature based on a lower-order element pair (P1b-P1-P1) and solve a linear approximation based on a higher-order element pair (P2-P1-P2) on the same mesh, which shows that the new algorithms have the same convergence rate as the two-step finite element methods. What is more, the stability analysis of the proposed algorithms is derived. Finally, numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the efficacy and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

Findings

Finally, numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the efficacy and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

Originality/value

The novel parallel two-step algorithms for incompressible natural convection problem are proposed. The rigorous analysis of the stability is given for the proposed parallel two-step algorithms. Extensive 2D/3D numerical tests demonstrate that the parallel two-step algorithms can deal with the incompressible natural convection problem for high Rayleigh number well.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2014

R. Chen, J. Lv, J. Feng, Y. Liu and W. Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an effective method to discriminate seal inks with Raman microscopy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an effective method to discriminate seal inks with Raman microscopy.

Design/methodology/approach

Raman spectra could effectively avoid interference from the paper and give extra peak information in the inks discrimination and identification. Thus, a Renishaw invia confocal Raman microscope system was employed for ink analysis in this study. A total of 12 representative seal ink samples, widely used in seven Chinese provinces, were investigated using the latest model of Renishaw Raman microscope.

Findings

Four types of inks were identified and discriminated successfully. Popular pigments such as Pigment Scarlet Powder, Pigment Yellow 55, phthalocyanine blue, Bronze red C and PbCrO3 were all identified in these seal ink samples. The indicative peaks to identify and discriminate the inks were also summarised and tentatively interpreted.

Research limitations/implications

More ink samples were needed to establish a useful library. Many other pigments used in inks were still unknown.

Practical implications

This method was proved to be fast, accurate and non-destructive, and it could be more easily applied in real cases than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

Originality/value

This method can help scientists discriminate some inks, which can hardly be discriminated by other techniques. The results are useful for the ink analysis and discrimination in forensic (document examination and file source identification), polymer and pigment fields.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

J.G. Lv, S. Liu, J.M. Feng, Y. Liu, S.D. Zhou and R. Chen

The purpose of this paper is to identify different automotive coatings using Confocal Raman microscope which could hardly be differentiated with Fourier transform infrared…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify different automotive coatings using Confocal Raman microscope which could hardly be differentiated with Fourier transform infrared microscope (FTIR).

Design/methodology/approach

Raman spectroscopy was used to provide extra vibration information to infrared spectroscopy. Paints preparation was not necessary, and only 30 s was needed for each sample in an optimised method. Paints were first analysed by FTIR and then compared with Raman microscope.

Findings

Raman microscope was used to address the lack of ability of FTIR in discriminating four groups of paints in same colours. This study indicated that Raman microscopy is especially effective in sensing pigments and could successfully identify all pigments in the paints.

Research limitations/implications

The two instruments in combination produce accurate results than when used individually, especially in complex and multi-layered paints analysis.

Practical implications

The method proved to be fast, accurate and non-destructive, and it could be easily applied to real cases.

Originality/value

With this method, scientists could discriminate some coating types which were hard to be discriminated by other techniques.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2020

Caitlin Candice Ferreira

Through the lens of experiential learning theory, this conceptual paper examines the factors influencing the likelihood of transitioning from hybrid to full-time…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of experiential learning theory, this conceptual paper examines the factors influencing the likelihood of transitioning from hybrid to full-time entrepreneurship. It is critical to evaluate the experiential learning that takes place during the hybrid phase, in order to establish a more nuanced understanding of the dynamic entrepreneurial journey.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper made use of a secondary data analysis of the existing academic literature, in particular using a thematic analysis, in order to propose a conceptual model and associated propositions.

Findings

The proposed conceptual model identifies four factors: fear of failure, perceived risk, entrepreneurial competency development and self-efficacy that are predicted to influence the transition decision. This paper establishes hybrid entrepreneurship as an effective learning ground and path toward full-time entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

Providing insights into the factors that influence the transition, allows policy makers to establish systems and incubators to support hybrid entrepreneurs reach the tipping point at which they have sufficient knowledge to enter full-time entrepreneurship. This paper establishes the importance of developmental policies aimed at encouraging hybrid entrepreneurship. There are also implications for managers of hybrid entrepreneurs to establish policies that encourage a culture of transparency and reap the benefits of enhanced employee development.

Originality/value

The paper has three predominant sources of value. First, offering a multidisciplinary approach by extending an existing theory to a new context; second, through the establishment of a conceptual model, offering propositions readily linked to hypotheses for future empirical assessment and third, enhancing the visibility of hybrid entrepreneurship in the literature to encourage public policy intervention and support.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Taiwen Feng, Hongyan Sheng and Minghui Li

Based on resource dependence theory and transaction cost economics this study explores how green customer integration (GCI) affects financial performance via information…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on resource dependence theory and transaction cost economics this study explores how green customer integration (GCI) affects financial performance via information sharing and opportunistic behavior, and the moderating effects of dependence and trust.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a theoretical model and tests it using data from two-waved survey data of 206 Chinese manufacturers. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical linear regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that GCI has a significant and positive impact on information sharing, but its impact on opportunistic behavior is insignificant. Notably, information sharing has a significant and positive impact on financial performance, while opportunistic behavior has an insignificant impact on financial performance. In addition, dependence negatively moderates the impact of GCI on information sharing and positively moderates the impact of GCI on opportunistic behavior. Trust negatively moderates the impact of GCI on opportunistic behavior.

Originality/value

Although GCI has received widespread attention, how it affects a firm's performance remains unclear. Most previous studies have focused only on its bright side and ignored its dark side. This study highlights how GCI affects financial performance through information sharing and opportunistic behavior, and the moderating effects of dependence and trust. This enriches the understanding of how and under what conditions GCI affects a firm's performance.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2016

Jan Selmer, Jakob Lauring, Ling Eleanor Zhang and Charlotte Jonasson

In this chapter, we focus on expatriate CEOs who are assigned by the parent company to work in a subsidiary and compare them to those who themselves have initiated to work…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, we focus on expatriate CEOs who are assigned by the parent company to work in a subsidiary and compare them to those who themselves have initiated to work abroad as CEOs. Since we do not know much about these individuals, we direct our attention to: (1) who they are (demographics), (2) what they are like (personality), and (3) how they perform (job performance).

Methodology/approach

Data was sought from 93 assigned expatriate CEOs and 94 self-initiated expatriate CEOs in China.

Findings

Our findings demonstrate that in terms of demography, self-initiated CEOs were more experienced than assigned CEOs. With regard to personality, we found difference in self-control and dispositional anger: Assigned expatriate CEOs had more self-control and less angry temperament than their self-initiated counterparts. Finally, we found assigned expatriate CEOs to rate their job performance higher than self-initiated CEOs.

Originality/value

Although there may not always be immediate benefits, career consideration often plays a role when individuals choose whether to become an expatriate. For many years, organizations have used expatriation to develop talented managers for high-level positions in the home country. Recently, however, a new trend has emerged. Talented top managers are no longer expatriated only from within parent companies to subsidiaries. Self-initiated expatriates with no prior affiliation in the parent company are increasingly used to fill top management positions in subsidiaries.

Details

Global Talent Management and Staffing in MNEs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-353-5

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Line Ettrich and Torben Juul Andersen

The world in which companies operate today is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous, thus subjecting contemporary forms to an array of risks that challenge their…

Abstract

The world in which companies operate today is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous, thus subjecting contemporary forms to an array of risks that challenge their viability in an increasingly competitive landscape. Organizations that cling to their traditional ways of operating impede their ability to survive while those able to embrace evolving changes and lever their strategic response capabilities (SRCs) will thrive against the odds. The possession of such capabilities has become a prominent explanation for effective adaptation to the impending changes but is rarely analyzed and tested empirically. Strategic adaptation typically assumes innovation as an important component, but we know little about how the innovative processes interact with the firm’s SRCs. Hence, this study investigates these implied relationships to discern their effects on organizational performance and risk outcomes. It explores the effects of SRCs and the role of innovation as intertwined adaptive mechanisms supporting strategic renewal that can attain superior performance and risk effects. The relationships are analyzed based on a large sample of US manufacturing firms over the decade 2010–2019. The study reveals that firms possessing effective SRCs have the ability to exploit opportunities and deflect risky situations to gain favorable performance and risk outcomes. While innovation indeed plays a role, the precise nature and dynamic effect thereof remain inconclusive.

Details

Strategic Responses for a Sustainable Future: New Research in International Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-929-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Reginald L. Tucker, Graham H. Lowman and Louis D. Marino

Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic traits are often viewed as negative or undesirable personality traits. However, recent research demonstrates that individuals…

Abstract

Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic traits are often viewed as negative or undesirable personality traits. However, recent research demonstrates that individuals with these traits possess qualities that may be personally beneficial within the business contexts. In this chapter, we conceptualize a balanced perspective of these traits throughout the entrepreneurial process (opportunity recognition, opportunity evaluation, and opportunity exploitation) and discuss human resources management strategies that can be employed to enhance the benefits, or minimize the challenges, associated with Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic traits. Specifically, we propose that Machiavellian qualities are most beneficial in the evaluation stage of entrepreneurship, and Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic qualities are beneficial in the exploitation stage of entrepreneurship.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-263-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Marc-David L. Seidel and Henrich R. Greve

In social theory, emergence is the process of novelty (1) creation, (2) growth, and (3) formation into a recognizable social object, process, or structure. Emergence is…

Abstract

In social theory, emergence is the process of novelty (1) creation, (2) growth, and (3) formation into a recognizable social object, process, or structure. Emergence is recognized as important for the existence of novel features of society such as new organizations, new practices, or new relations between actors. In this introduction to the volume on emergence, we introduce a framework for examining emergence processes and theories that have been applied or can be applied to each of the three stages. We also review each volume chapter and discuss their relation to each other. Finally, we make suggestions on the future of research on social emergence processes.

Details

Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Nicholas Dew and Stuart Read

Tucked in the back of Venkataraman’s 1997 work on the distinctive domain of entrepreneurship (DDE) lies a pointer to a question each individual must face when choosing to…

Abstract

Tucked in the back of Venkataraman’s 1997 work on the distinctive domain of entrepreneurship (DDE) lies a pointer to a question each individual must face when choosing to start a new venture; “is entrepreneurship worth it?” Inventorying costs associated with risk, uncertainty, and illiquidity against surpluses from financial and psychological factors unique to entrepreneurship, Venkataraman tempts readers to tally entrepreneurial returns. The authors summarize and integrate an academic study of these various cost and return components over the past 20 years using Venkataraman’s original framework. The authors find the answer to the question of “is entrepreneurship worth it?” varies with time. Researcher’s answer to the question has shifted from an early view that entrepreneurs sacrifice financial gain in exchange for soft psychological benefits to a more positive view that entrepreneurs are rewarded both financially and psychologically for the unique costs borne in the DDE. But the rewards are not immediate. In entrepreneur time, break-even emerges by gradually overcoming an initial deficit. As surpluses accrue, returns to entrepreneurs likely eventually exceed those of their wage-earning peers.

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