Search results

1 – 10 of over 60000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1949

This exhibition was primarily intended to show something of the variety of bibliographies and abstracting journals in the English language. It was not intended to be…

Abstract

This exhibition was primarily intended to show something of the variety of bibliographies and abstracting journals in the English language. It was not intended to be comprehensive; and although an effort was made to include the most authorative works in each field, in some cases the works shown could claim to be little more than representative.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

J. English, T.C. Haupt and J.J. Smallwood

Construction by its very nature constitutes a challenge in terms of health and safety (H&S) and ergonomics as it exposes workers to a range of health, safety, and…

Abstract

Construction by its very nature constitutes a challenge in terms of health and safety (H&S) and ergonomics as it exposes workers to a range of health, safety, and ergonomic hazards, manual handling included. Internationally, women constitute a minor percentage of the construction workforce. Furthermore, perceptions exist that women are not suited to construction, that construction work is too physical for women, and that the image of the industry discourages participation by women. Whether or not perceptions are just, they are important as people act on them. A study was initiated to determine perceptions relative to: participation of women in general; their role; their capacity; their impact; their potential contribution; barriers to their participation; and general and gender specific issues. The paper reports on studies conducted in South Africa and Tanzania, the salient findings being: women have a role in construction; increased participation by women will contribute to improving the image of construction; women have requirements related to their gender and roles; some construction materials constitute a manual materials handling problem to women, and current welfare facilities for women (such as medical support or child care) are inadequate. The paper concludes that endeavours are necessary to change attitudes, promote participation by women, accommodate women, and improve conditions, particularly H&S.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1966

LIBRARIANSHIP is an established profession, international in scope, and currently passing through a period of acute shortage of trained personnel. The City of Liverpool…

Abstract

LIBRARIANSHIP is an established profession, international in scope, and currently passing through a period of acute shortage of trained personnel. The City of Liverpool, situated at the gate‐way of the New World, has given its School of Librarian‐ship some of the elements of its international character, while the current dearth of librarians has given it the opportunity to expand.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Marlene Morrison

This chapter provides a retrospective and prospective exploration of some of the challenges faced by doctoral education, specifically as they relate to advanced studies of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a retrospective and prospective exploration of some of the challenges faced by doctoral education, specifically as they relate to advanced studies of educational administration (EA).

Methodology

It applies a critical stance to the current status of knowledge in the ‘leadership field’ and the intellectual underpinnings that inform the studies available as reference for doctoral students.

Findings

Nested within wider changing conditions for university and doctoral education, it is argued that the published field as currently constituted suffers from both banal and ‘non-wicked’ leadership orthodoxies that might lead to doctoral stagnation.

Practical implications

Reasons are suggested and prospects considered for revitalising scholarship for the upcoming generation of EA alumni, scholars and practitioners.

Details

Investing in our Education: Leading, Learning, Researching and the Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-131-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Satu Tuomainen

The purpose of this paper is to describe a support course for English-medium instruction (EMI) which continues to expand in European higher education (HE). While the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a support course for English-medium instruction (EMI) which continues to expand in European higher education (HE). While the phenomenon of teaching through English is not novel, support for university teachers appears to remain limited despite recognised challenges of EMI such as language proficiency and pedagogical considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

In the course non-native university lecturers in Finland were provided a course to practice various elements of English for academic purposes and receive feedback on their teaching. A pre-course needs analysis was used to determine the main causes for EMI concerns with non-native lecturers, and which elements of English they wished to develop during the course. The course itself consisted of six joint meetings, followed by individual teaching demonstrations, and concluded with a post-course analysis.

Findings

Findings suggest that Finnish university lecturers were pre-course most concerned about the accuracy, fluency and pronunciation of their academic English. Based on the post-course analysis, the most beneficial elements of the EMI support course were the reflective discussions about EMI, the language practice and receiving individual feedback.

Practical implications

The study suggests that support courses for university lecturers involved with EMI should not cover only language but allow lecturers to share their concerns and experiences and to practice in authentic teaching situations in English.

Originality/value

This study describes a pedagogically effective method to assist and encourage lecturers in HE to the use of English in their instruction.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Jacqueline Manuel and Don Carter

This paper provides a critical interpretative analysis of the first secondary English syllabus for schools in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, contained within the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a critical interpretative analysis of the first secondary English syllabus for schools in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, contained within the Courses for Study for High Schools (New South Wales Department of Public Instruction, 1911). The purpose of the paper is to examine the “continuities that link English curriculum discourses and practices with previous discourses and practices” in the rhetorical curriculum. The analysis identifies those aspects of the 1911 English syllabus that have since become normative and challenges the appropriateness of certain enduring orthodoxies in a twenty-first century context.

Design/methodology/approach

Focussing on a landmark historical curriculum document from 1911, this paper draws on methods of historical comparative and documentary analysis. It sits within the tradition of historical curriculum research that critiques curriculum documents as a primary source for understanding continuities of discourses and practices. A social constructionist approach informs the analysis.

Findings

The conceptualisation of subject English evident in the structure, content and emphases of the 1911 English syllabus encodes a range of “discourses and practices” that have in some form endured or been “reconstituted and remade” (Cormack, 2008, p. 275) over the course of a century. The analysis draws attention to those aspects of the subject that have remained unproblematised and taken-for-granted, and the implications of this for universal student participation and attainment.

Originality/value

This paper reorients critical attention to a significant historical curriculum document that has not, to date, been explored against the backdrop twenty-first century senior secondary English curriculum. In doing so, it presents extended insights into a range of now normative structures, beliefs, ideas, assumptions and practices and questions the potential impact of these on student learning, access and achievement in senior secondary English in NSW in the twenty-first century.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2017

Ross Collin

In this chapter, I consider arguments for aligning ELA with the demands of a soon-to-arrive knowledge economy. I ask how these arguments call ELA teachers to prepare…

Abstract

In this chapter, I consider arguments for aligning ELA with the demands of a soon-to-arrive knowledge economy. I ask how these arguments call ELA teachers to prepare students to work in an economy that values creativity, interpretation, and cutting-edge literacies – the stock-in-trade of ELA classes. Although these arguments have many strengths – they play down standardization and play up creativity – they rest on faulty assumptions about the number and distribution of high-skills jobs in the near future. Most people will not perform work that leverages creativity and cutting-edge knowledge. Given this reality, I ask how teachers of ELA teachers can take what’s good in the knowledge economy approach and adapt it so diverse students can acquire literacies that may help them succeed in and, perhaps, transform the economic field. This more viable approach to ELA calls teachers to teach not only economically valuable forms of reading and writing but also ways of critiquing and changing economies in line with democratic principles. I illustrate the latter approach to ELA instruction with a scenario activity for a unit on A Raisin in the Sun.

Details

Innovations in English Language Arts Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-050-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Wayne Sawyer

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the important work of Peter Medway in seeking to define English as a school subject in the period from the 1980s to the early years…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the important work of Peter Medway in seeking to define English as a school subject in the period from the 1980s to the early years of this century.

Design/methodology/approach

The author reviews the work of Peter Medway.

Findings

The paper addresses the issue of how his work reflected – or not – the curriculum thinking of his time and the complexity of ideas he brought to this endeavour.

Originality/value

This paper is an original look at the work of Peter Medway in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Lifang Cui, Gillian Hubbard and Margaret Gleeson

The purpose of this paper is to survey and consider the implications of the literature justifying the value of teaching poetry. There has been a long tradition of…

Downloads
1310

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to survey and consider the implications of the literature justifying the value of teaching poetry. There has been a long tradition of literature education in the English departments of Chinese universities. English Poetry courses are offered within optional literature modules in senior stages of a BA in English language and literature. In 2000, the new national syllabus for tertiary English majors was issued. This syllabus has brought the teaching of English into line with the perceived practical needs of society. As a result, poetry courses have been under threat within the degree. A substantial number of university teachers have responded to this threat with articles arguing the value of teaching of poetry.

Design/methodology/approach

The China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the largest database of academic journals in China, reveals that from 2000 to 2013, 102 articles about teaching English poetry to Chinese people learning English as a foreign language were published in Chinese academic journals, of which 67 are concerned with English majors. This literature examines these 67 articles.

Findings

These articles justify the purpose of teaching English poetry, evaluate the content of poetry courses and share pedagogical strategies. The issues within this discussion fall into three categories: why teach poetry; what to teach in poetry courses; and how to teach poetry. Because the commitment of Chinese teachers to sharing their beliefs about teaching English poetry is positioned in the context of increased advocacy for the creation of inter-disciplinary market-orientated graduates, discomfort, uncertainty and the desire for change emerge in this discussion. On the other hand, teachers looking for change express caution about the costs of changing pedagogical approaches on the development of the skills of close reading and analysis of poetical texts.

Originality/value

This investigation of the local Chinese context resonates with and contributes to the wider discussion of the challenges faced by English literature teachers in both second- (L2) and first-language (L1) contexts and warrants examination. It is difficult to say in advance how far such knowledge could contribute to any policy decisions that may be made in the future, but it is important that the voice of teachers contributes to the larger international debate about the value of humanities in tertiary-level education.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Brian Bloch and Donna Starks

Business people in the English‐speaking world tend to underrate the significance of language skills in general, and in particular, the importance of variation within the…

Downloads
4433

Abstract

Business people in the English‐speaking world tend to underrate the significance of language skills in general, and in particular, the importance of variation within the English language. This article considers the various types of English that are spoken throughtout the world and the implications for business transactions. Attention is paid to the problems that arise owing to the use of one type of English as opposed to another owing to the various forms of distortion and misunderstanding that arise. Attitudes towards different varieties of English are also considered in terms of a possible negative impact on negotiation of business dealings in general. The impact of ways of learning English is outlined and some suggestions made as to how to overcome the problems that arise through intra‐language variation in business.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 60000