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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

J. Beedon and M. Raff

Describes how the West Midlands Employment Service has developed a strategy for total quality. Follows the stages an office goes through on their Quality Path using a…

Abstract

Describes how the West Midlands Employment Service has developed a strategy for total quality. Follows the stages an office goes through on their Quality Path using a gardening analogy to describe the process. Acknowledges that TQ initiatives need to continue from the top down, the bottom up and through the middle with every level involved until they become part of business as usual.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Nerev F. Kock, Robert J. McQueen and Megan Baker

Recent surveys show that process‐reengineering (BPR) has had widespread adoption in western countries. This has been motivated by case studies where drastic improvements…

Abstract

Recent surveys show that process‐reengineering (BPR) has had widespread adoption in western countries. This has been motivated by case studies where drastic improvements in quality, productivity, cost reduction and competitiveness have been reported. The rate of failure in re‐engineering attempts, though, has been reported to be equally high. It is estimated that over 70 per cent of all re‐engineering attempts fail to produce bottom‐line improvements. Describes one such failed attempt in a large public organization in Brazil. As a result of the re‐engineering attempt, the organization had its IT infrastructure significantly improved, and the access to IT was decentralized by the downsizing of computer applications from a mainframe to a local area network. On the other hand, no radical changes in the organization’s business processes had resulted, despite the US$ 8 million invested in the BPR attempt. Moreover, even though some processes had been automated, almost no staff reduction was effected. The lack of layoffs meant that even the increase in efficiency in those processes, which by no means was radical, was not realized.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Richard McLean and Jiju Antony

The purpose of this paper is to present the core themes derived from literature that contribute to the failure of continuous improvement initiatives in the manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the core themes derived from literature that contribute to the failure of continuous improvement initiatives in the manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken was to complete a systematic review of literature, grouping the failure factors through the use of idea maps and affinity diagrams into the core themes reported.

Findings

From the review it is evident that continuous improvement initiatives can fail due to a multitude of factors; but that these can be grouped under eight core themes. The themes found to contribute to the failure of continuous improvement initiatives are: Motives and Expectations, Organizational Culture and Environment, The Management Leadership, Implementation Approach, Training, Project Management, Employee Involvement Levels, and Feedback and Results. These themes have been further categorized into a three-stage model.

Research limitations/implications

The review was carried out using a selection of high-quality journals, although this may have restricted the findings. The research is also limited to manufacturing, so it is unknown if the same factors impact initiatives in the service or public sectors. Continuous improvement is defined for the purpose of the study as TQM, Lean, and Six Sigma.

Originality/value

From a practical perspective, the research findings create awareness for organizations of the complexity of organizational change in the form of continuous improvement implementation.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Hanieh Arazmjoo and Hossein Rahmanseresht

The purpose of this paper is to offer a dynamic meta-heuristic model of effecting organizational change which informs smooth directing and routinizing change according to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a dynamic meta-heuristic model of effecting organizational change which informs smooth directing and routinizing change according to the specific situation relevant to every change attempt.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the dynamic nature of variables and their interaction, developing a static model cannot be tenable. This study, therefore, attempts to generate a meta-heuristic method for constructing a dynamic organizational change model by combining qualitative methods (content analysis and Delphi Technique) and Artificial Neural Networks (Fuzzy Theory and Genetic Algorithm).

Findings

Each change program requires its unique method of implementation as change attempts are context specific. Hence, static models should give way to some dynamic ones. Whereas such static models abound, this paper stands out as offering a dynamic model for organizational change by using a rather unconventional method.

Research limitations/implications

This can be regarded as a road map informing higher echelons of the complexity and leadership of change, while at the same time helping change agents have access to acceptable amount of variables that can make their change attempts more promising.

Originality/value

This model contains more flexible variables which reflect the incumbent organizations’ situations. While almost all previous models of change attempt take into account a few/handful variables which are seen to impact on change solidly and independently. But such an analysis with the usual statistical and mathematical methods is not justified. This challenge is met here using metaheuristics and artificial intelligence methods. The model formulated, thus, is dynamic, non-linear and multi-dimensional. Entering the data related to any specific field turns it to a customized model suitable for use in a given field; and this is not only a contribution to the theory but also can allegedly increase the chance of the success of the change agent managing to utilize the optimal amount of variables suggested in this paper.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

David Wilkinson and Mike Pedler

Top‐down or outside‐in change methodologies are increasingly seen to be ineffective. Systems thinking suggests that change in organizations is a much less straightforward…

Abstract

Top‐down or outside‐in change methodologies are increasingly seen to be ineffective. Systems thinking suggests that change in organizations is a much less straightforward and more subtle phenomenon than previous models allow. Since the late 1970s and as organic metaphors have become used more, the concept of organizational learning has emerged as central to the issue. However, an understanding of how this may take place is still undeveloped. Recently technologies for whole systems development have emerged based on Weisbord′s dictum that for change or learning to occur we need to “get everybody into improving the whole”. Whole systems development can offer a way to realizing the learning organization. Provides a case study of whole systems development in action within Walsall Metropolitan Borough Council in the UK. Begins with a brief account of the ideas on which whole systems development is based and concludes with a commentary on the case study.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1930

IN this and subsequent numbers we are issuing an art supplement devoted to the subject of Library Architecture. Sheffield's new library system is the first to be dealt…

Abstract

IN this and subsequent numbers we are issuing an art supplement devoted to the subject of Library Architecture. Sheffield's new library system is the first to be dealt with, followed by Exeter, Dagenham, Croydon, Burnley, Hornsey, Bolton, Halifax, and others. The importance of library planning for the modern librarian cannot be overestimated, seeing the great need for remodelling old buildings and for providing new ones for new areas of population. The spread of population over the country is the most remarkable phenomenon of the age in which we live; there are now flourishing towns in places where ten years ago corn was growing. The old idea of one library in a town has given place to library provision which in some places approximates in its numbers of “agencies” to that which is frequent in America. So we get the need for many types of building, and hope to describe a number of them in this series.

Details

New Library World, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Nikola Naumov

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to critically evaluate the implementation of technologies from the perspective of guest services, innovation and visitor…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to critically evaluate the implementation of technologies from the perspective of guest services, innovation and visitor experiences. The paper focuses on the value of robots, service automation and artificial intelligence in hospitality and examines their influence on service quality

Design/methodology/approach: The chapter is a critical and conceptual overview of the emergence and implementation of robots, service automation and artificial intelligence in the hospitality with an emphasis on service, service quality and guest experience. A comprehensive overview of the academic literature of customer service and guest experience is combined with industry examples from various service operations in hospitality in order to examine the implementation of RAISA in the hospitality industry from a range of academic and practical viewpoints.

Findings: The chapter argues that despite the global acceptance of technologies in service industries in general and hospitality in particular, it remains difficult to find the right balance between digital and human interactions. In the context of service quality, the implementation of robots and service automation is increasingly important for gaining a competitive advantage, but the provision of more personalized guest experiences remains controversial.

Originality/value: The study provides a comprehensive and systematic review of RAISA in a hospitality context and examine their impacts on service quality. The chapter is a critical examination of the potential of RAISA to transform the service experience and raises some fundamental questions regarding the need for RAISA, its practical implications and impact over the understanding and measurement of service quality.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

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