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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Sean D. Darling and J. Barton Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to identify unique values and competencies linked to private and public sector environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify unique values and competencies linked to private and public sector environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on critical incident interviews with a sample of senior leaders who had experience in both the public and private sectors.

Findings

The findings illustrate distinct public and private sector relevant competencies that reflect the unique values of their organizations and the character of the organization’s environments. This paper suggests a range of distinct public sector competencies including: managing competing interests, managing the political environment, communicating in a political environment, interpersonal motivational skills, adding value for clients, and impact assessment in decision-making. These were very different than those identified as critical for the private sector environment: business acumen, visionary leadership, marketing communication, market acumen, interpersonal communication, client service, and timely and opportunistic decision-making. Private sector competencies reflect private sector environments where goals need to be specifically defined and implemented in a timely manner related to making a profit and surviving in a competitive environment. Public sector competencies are driven by environments exhibiting more complex and unresolvable problems and the need to respond to conflicting publics and serving the public good while surviving in a political environment.

Originality/value

A key message of this study is that competency frameworks need to be connected to the organization’s unique environments and the values that managers are seeking to achieve. This is particularly important for public organizations that have more complex and changing environments.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

J. Barton Cunningham

Ask a manager what she/he does. She/he will probably tell you about functions or processes such as planning, organising, budgeting, and controlling (Fayol 1949).

Abstract

Ask a manager what she/he does. She/he will probably tell you about functions or processes such as planning, organising, budgeting, and controlling (Fayol 1949).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This review is based on “Implementing change in public sector organizations,” by J. Barton Cunningham and James S. Kempling. Some points made here about the principles behind organizational change might seem to be spelled out excessively, but there some useful observations about the public sector, its dependency on other agencies, and how obstacles to change can be surmounted.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

J. Barton Cunningham

Planning approaches have long been of interest in identifyingopportunities and co‐ordinating decisions. An “action”planning perspective is offered which seeks to assist…

Abstract

Planning approaches have long been of interest in identifying opportunities and co‐ordinating decisions. An “action” planning perspective is offered which seeks to assist managers in gaining membership commitment in the planning process.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

J. Barton Cunningham

Provides a perspective for creating a more formalized mentoringprogramme and for developing a culture of mentoring within anorganization. Describes certain principles…

Abstract

Provides a perspective for creating a more formalized mentoring programme and for developing a culture of mentoring within an organization. Describes certain principles which are applicable to all such programmes, derived from interviews with those who have been mentors and proteges. Identifies two steps in the process of developing a mentoring programme: defining the organization′s need for mentoring; and designing and implementing the mentoring programme. Elaborates on the components of these two steps. Concludes that a healthy mentoring programme should involve people when they are needed, and use them appropriately in assisting personnel development.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

James MacGregor and J. Barton Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the results from two public sector organizations to test a model of the organizational antecedents and health consequences of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the results from two public sector organizations to test a model of the organizational antecedents and health consequences of sickness presenteeism (SP) in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on two surveys of public employees, one including 237 respondents and another of 391 employees. The combined sample allowed for the testing of a model of organizational antecedents and the health consequences of SP.

Findings

The results supported the model, indicating that increased leader support and goal clarity decrease SP indirectly through increased trust. Decreasing presenteeism is associated with decreased sickness absence and better health.

Practical implications

The key practical application is in encouraging managers and scholars to recognize that the costs of presenteeism are as higher or higher than the costs of absenteeism.

Social implications

The social implications are clear in helping us recognize that when people come to work sick, they are not productive and are endangering the productivity of others.

Originality/value

This is the first time that research had defined and operationalized a causal model linking antecedents such as leader-member relations, goal clarity and trust with SP and absenteeism.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Frank Morven and J. Barton Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to define different types of culturally commensurate experiences, events, activities and interventions which Indigenous people find relevant…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define different types of culturally commensurate experiences, events, activities and interventions which Indigenous people find relevant for improving cultural diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on interviews and surveys with Indigenous Probations Officers, the authors define a framework of nine experiences and events relevant to the organization, team and cultural development.

Findings

The key finding lies in proposing a framework of what Indigenous Probation Officers finding lies view as commensurate experiences, activities or interventions which recognize their cultural context (American Psychological Association, 2003).

Research limitations/implications

The key limitations to this study are the size of the sample and the inability to conclusively argue that the framework of experiences developed can claim to represent those important for improving recruitment and retentions of all Indigenous Probation Officers. Further exploratory research of this type is necessary to add to this research in guiding future research and practice.

Practical implications

The definition of a multicultural experiences offered here might be useful in encouraging Probation Officers and others in developing a deeper appreciation of cultures of Indigenous peoples and other groups.

Social implications

The purpose is to better understand an Indigenous perspective on enhancing a connection to culture within the Corrections system.

Originality/value

Rather than using a list of competencies to shape behaviors and experiences that people practice, the underlying assumption is to encourage cultural multiculturalism framework competency development by focusing on experiences and events important to objectives related to improving diversity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

J. Barton Cunningham

Many managers have found popular and academic writings on job andorganisational design most interesting and have committed a great dealof energy in trying to use them…

Abstract

Many managers have found popular and academic writings on job and organisational design most interesting and have committed a great deal of energy in trying to use them. Terms such as job enrichment, job enlargement, Japanese management, and socio‐technical design have become well known for their potential in responding to problems of job dissatisfaction, labour instability, and poor workmanship. Ways in which “popular paperback” theories, as well as other more systematic organisational theories of design might be customised to the particular needs of the organisation are illustrated.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

J. Barton Cunningham

The increased efficiencies to be gained in improving logistics has pushed managers to explore a number of new ideas, technologies, and methods of information management…

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1389

Abstract

The increased efficiencies to be gained in improving logistics has pushed managers to explore a number of new ideas, technologies, and methods of information management and computerization. However, many companies in Asia are indicating that responsiveness and flexibility are the keys to responding to markets which are rapidly changing and where customers are requiring a range of services. Studies several local and international logistics firms in Singapore and elsewhere as a way of developing a better understanding of their difficulties and reasons for success. Illustrates why certain larger companies which have the capability to develop more sophisticated information and computer systems do not; instead, they chose to rely on more flexible systems which allow for learning and adaptation.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

J. Barton Cunningham and John Farquharson

General systems theory offers one perspective for defining andunderstanding the problems that organisations face. The author presentsa set of systems problem‐solving…

Abstract

General systems theory offers one perspective for defining and understanding the problems that organisations face. The author presents a set of systems problem‐solving principles, and offers a procedure which might be useful when conventional problem‐solving has not been totally successful. The article illustrates this procedure in trying to address a budget deficit problem in a large metropolitan hospital.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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