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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kate Yue Zhang and Bart Rienties

Global staffing has remained a main focus within the field of international human resource management (IHRM) since the 1970s. However, research in the psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

Global staffing has remained a main focus within the field of international human resource management (IHRM) since the 1970s. However, research in the psychological contract (PC) of expatriates is limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in PC breach and violation for organisational expatriates and self-initiated expatriates (SIEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was developed covering 52 organisational expatriates and 119 SIEs from 35 countries/regions working in China. Four follow-up focus group interviews including four organisational expatriates and 12 SIEs were conducted to further explain the findings of the survey.

Findings

The findings indicate that organisational expatriates experience significantly lower levels of PC breach and violation than SIEs. Three broad thematic areas arose from the triangulation of focus group interviews, including uncertainties in functioning of contracts, differences in job securities and career development opportunities, and cultural differences.

Practical implications

Employers should give a comprehensive orientation and cultural training to meet the needs of SIEs. Moreover, long-term career advancement paths should also be provided to SIEs to alleviate their vulnerability and insecurities working abroad.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the scholarship of self-initiated expatriation and PCs and give implications to IHRM strategies.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2018

Clare Johansson, Rowan Bedggood, Karen Farquharson and Aron Perenyi

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a shared leadership governance arrangement facilitates improved outcomes within a social marketing service eco-system…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a shared leadership governance arrangement facilitates improved outcomes within a social marketing service eco-system. The research was focussed on gaining an understanding of participants involved in a cross-institutional partnership. The case study selected to facilitate this exploration was a social marketing project that aimed to support aboriginal households in Victoria with regard to their energy efficiency. It thus investigated the meso-level insights experienced by partners and those delivering the service.

Design/methodology/approach

Interview (yarn-based) data from 20 individuals involved in an energy efficiency programme were collected and analysed. Participants shared their experiences via informal “yarns” that were conducted in the first 12 months of the programme. This timing was chosen to gain their initial self-reflective perspectives and their interactions within the shared leadership model.

Findings

The results of the analysis identified six key themes that are interrelated and fundamental to building trust between all actors involved. The themes include relationship building, advocating rights, managing competing priorities, being community driven, using communication that translates and using community networks. Four of the themes were found to be components of relationship and trust building, which collectively lead to effectively accessing aboriginal communities. These findings extend current knowledge on the structures necessary to ensure healthy eco-systems are sustained throughout social marketing programmes.

Research limitations/implications

The authors established that shared leadership is well aligned with service-dominant logic, and the findings of this study reveal that it can positively contribute to meso-level service eco-systems and thus improve social outcomes for recipients of social marketing efforts. The findings also underscore the need for social marketers to recognise the importance of having a culturally acceptable value co-creation model in social marketing programmes when working with Aboriginal Australians.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to explore and develop the authors’ understanding of the efficacy of adopting a shared leadership approach in social marketing. Shared leadership has the potential to be an institutional arrangement that facilitates service-dominant logic and the value co-creation process, influencing positive behaviour change at the micro level in aboriginal communities. Specifically, it is the first to identify that “advocating rights” is an important component for partners to adopt in cross-cultural collaborations when collectively running social marketing programmes.

Abstract

Organizational researchers studying well-being – as well as organizations themselves – often place much of the burden on employees to manage and preserve their own well-being. Missing from this discussion is how – from a human resources management (HRM) perspective – organizations and managers can directly and positively shape the well-being of their employees. The authors use this review to paint a picture of what organizations could be like if they valued people holistically and embraced the full experience of employees’ lives to promote well-being at work. In so doing, the authors tackle five challenges that managers may have to help their employees navigate, but to date have received more limited empirical and theoretical attention from an HRM perspective: (1) recovery at work; (2) women’s health; (3) concealable stigmas; (4) caregiving; and (5) coping with socio-environmental jolts. In each section, the authors highlight how past research has treated managerial or organizational support on these topics, and pave the way for where research needs to advance from an HRM perspective. The authors conclude with ideas for tackling these issues methodologically and analytically, highlighting ways to recruit and support more vulnerable samples that are encapsulated within these topics, as well as analytic approaches to study employee experiences more holistically. In sum, this review represents a call for organizations to now – more than ever – build thriving organizations.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Legal Professions: Work, Structure and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-800-2

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2016

Greggory L. Keiffer and Forrest C. Lane

This paper aims to introduce matching in propensity score analysis (PSA) as an alternative statistical approach for researchers looking to make causal inferences using…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce matching in propensity score analysis (PSA) as an alternative statistical approach for researchers looking to make causal inferences using intact groups.

Design/methodology/approach

An illustrative example demonstrated the varying results of analysis of variance, analysis of covariance and PSA on a heuristic data set. The three approaches were compared by results and violations of statistical assumptions.

Findings

Through the illustrative example, it is demonstrated how different statistical approaches can produce varied results. Only PSA mitigated pre-existing group differences without violating the assumption of independence.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to answer calls in the literature for more robust statistical methodologies to better inform human resource development practice and theory.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Debbie Bargallie, Chris Cunneen, Elena Marchetti, Juan Tauri and Megan Williams

Criminology and criminal justice research in Australia that involves Indigenous peoples or has an Indigenous focus currently needs to follow guidelines of the National…

Abstract

Criminology and criminal justice research in Australia that involves Indigenous peoples or has an Indigenous focus currently needs to follow guidelines of the National Health and Medical Research Council National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (Updated 2018) and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (2012). However, neither of these documents specifically focus on research or evaluations in the criminology and criminal justice space, resulting in discipline-specific gaps. Drawing from both the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Indigenous and post-colonial literature on research ethics, our chapter focuses on three core questions: (a) What does ‘free, prior and informed consent’ to participate in research mean and how should it be obtained and operationalised in criminology and criminal justice research involving Indigenous peoples and communities? (b) What does the requirement that research be ‘for the benefit of Indigenous peoples’ mean in the context of criminal justice research? and (c) How can ethical guidelines ensure that Indigenous-focussed criminological and criminal justice research and evaluation enhance and support Indigenous peoples’ empowerment and self-determination?

Details

Indigenous Research Ethics: Claiming Research Sovereignty Beyond Deficit and the Colonial Legacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-390-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2021

Mohamed Behery

This study aims to examine the effects of cosmopolitanism on organizational commitment (OC), with a particular focus on the mediating impact of the employees…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of cosmopolitanism on organizational commitment (OC), with a particular focus on the mediating impact of the employees’ challenge-oriented and affiliation-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors within the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The researcher has adopted the theory of planned behavior, the theory of reasoned action and the social exchange theory as a theoretical foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative (deductive) method is used. The primary data is collected using a cross-sectional questionnaire. The data collection process was administered across five months. A total of 800 questionnaires were distributed randomly to various business sectors and industries in the UAE. A response rate of 86.9% was achieved, leading to 695 complete and feasible questionnaires.

Findings

Statistical analyzes prove that cosmopolitanism was indeed a valid predictor of OC. Contrary to the expectations, and more specifically, the results revealed that diversity is not a predictor of both challenge-oriented organizational citizenship and OC. The current study indicates that global openness (GOP) is an insignificant predictor of OC. Most remarkably, the present study shows a partially substantial mediation effect of affiliation-oriented organizational citizenship between GOP and OC. Last but not least, challenge-oriented and affiliation-oriented organizational citizenship are significant full mediators between one-world consciousness, cultural acceptance and OC.

Originality/value

Globalization has dramatically increased the diversity of the workforce. This scenario has led to the creation of the concept of Cosmopolitanism. The UAE is a unique setting, given that the workforce in the region is globally diverse. Thus, this study is a unique attempt to bridge the gap between the rich Western theories and the under-researched Non-Western context, namely, the UAE. As each city has its local-rooted environment, one cannot argue that Cosmopolitanism inevitably ignores international orientation. This study explains the embedded factors that constitute Dubai city’s cosmopolitan community, where developments and emerging growing economic trends arise.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Sara Peich and Ronit Calderon‐Margalit

Pressure ulcers (PUs) continue to be a distressing medical problem. The Nursing Quality Improvement Unit of Israel's Hadassah Mount Scopus Medical Center designed and…

662

Abstract

Pressure ulcers (PUs) continue to be a distressing medical problem. The Nursing Quality Improvement Unit of Israel's Hadassah Mount Scopus Medical Center designed and implemented a quality improvement intervention program to reduce the incidence of nosocomial PUs. Assessing data, it was found that 46.7 percent of nosocomial PUs develop inpatients with hip fractures. Following the first audit of all patients with hip fractures, an intervention program was focused on the orthopedic ward and the recovery room. Intervention in the orthopedic ward included providing each patient with a visco‐elastic mattress and a specially designed cushion for the elevation of the affected limb. In the recovery room, pressure‐relieving practices were introduced. Following the implementation of the intervention program, the second audit revealed a reduction in the incidence of nosocomial PUs from 12.9 percent to 0 percent. Although patients with hip fractures are still at very high risk of developing nosocomial PUs, prevention is feasible.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Jeffrey R. Dudas

It is widely recognized by scholars that superhero stories tend to glorify vigilante justice; after all, these stories often maintain that extralegal acts of violence are…

Abstract

It is widely recognized by scholars that superhero stories tend to glorify vigilante justice; after all, these stories often maintain that extralegal acts of violence are necessary for combatting existential threats to personal and public safety. This scholarly common sense fosters a widespread dismissal of superhero stories as uncomplicated apologia for an authoritarian politics of law and order that is animated by hatred of unpopular people and ideas. However, some prominent contemporary Batman stories, including those told in the graphic novels of Grant Morrison and in the blockbuster movies of Christopher Nolan, are ambivalent: in their portraits of Batman and Joker as dark twins and secret colleagues, these stories both legitimize and challenge the countersubversive politics of American law and order.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-221-8

Keywords

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