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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Mark J. Avery, Allan W. Cripps and Gary D. Rogers

This study explores key governance, leadership and management activities that have impact on quality, risk and safety within Australian healthcare organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores key governance, leadership and management activities that have impact on quality, risk and safety within Australian healthcare organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Current non-executive directors (n = 12) of public and private health boards were interviewed about contemporary approaches to fiduciary and corporate responsibilities for quality assurance and improvement outcomes in the context of risk and safety management for patient care. Verbatim transcripts were subjected to thematic analysis triangulated with Leximancer-based text mining.

Findings

Boards operate in a strong legislative, healthcare standards and normative environment of quality and risk management. Support and influence that create a positive quality and risk management culture within the organisation, actions that disseminate quality and risk broadly and at depth for all levels, and implementation and sustained development of quality and risk systems that report on and contain risk were critical tasks for boards and their directors.

Practical implications

Findings from this study may provide health directors with key quality and risk management agenda points to expand or deepen the impact of governance around health facilities' quality and risk management.

Originality/value

This study has identified key governance activities and responsibilities where boards demonstrate that they add value in terms of potential improvement to hospital and health service quality care outcomes. The demonstrable influence identified makes an important contribution to our understanding of healthcare governance.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1911

[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's…

Abstract

[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's railway journey from Perth and has a magnificent cathedral, founded in the twelfth century, which is well worthy of a visit.]

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2008

Rosemary J. Avery, Donald Kenkel, Dean R. Lillard, Alan Mathios and Hua Wang

Health information drives crucial consumer health decisions and plays a central role in healthcare markets. Consumers who are better-informed about smoking, diet, and…

Abstract

Health information drives crucial consumer health decisions and plays a central role in healthcare markets. Consumers who are better-informed about smoking, diet, and physical activity make healthier choices outside the healthcare sector (Kenkel, 1991; Ippolito & Mathios, 1990, 1995; Meara, 2001). Better-informed consumers also interact differently with physicians and other healthcare providers (e.g., Cutler, Landrum, & Stewart, 2006). In addition to the immediate consequences for individual consumers, health economists have long recognized that information also has broader implications for principal–agent relationships and the functioning of healthcare markets.1 More recent lines of research in health economics and medical sociology emphasize the potential role of consumer information in explaining health disparities associated with socioeconomic status (Deaton, 2002; Goldman & Lakdawalla, 2001; Glied & Lleras-Muney, 2003; Link & Phelan, 1995). Both health economists and medical sociologists stress that because of disparities in consumer information, rapid medical progress tends to be accompanied by increased disparities in medical treatment and health outcomes.

Details

Beyond Health Insurance: Public Policy to Improve Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-181-7

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Melanie R. Savelli

Without having a shared operationalization of what constitutes a direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) exposure, it is impossible to accurately generalize findings about…

Abstract

Purpose

Without having a shared operationalization of what constitutes a direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) exposure, it is impossible to accurately generalize findings about their effects. First, it needs to be established how the variables involved in exposures impact outcomes. This will allow for more accurate operationalizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 216 participants were recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and randomly assigned into one of four conditions to take an online survey. A 2 × 2 experiment (active/passive attention × low/high exposure) was conducted to determine if the level of attention, otherwise known as attentiveness, and the number of exposures impacted preferences for a fictitious prescription sleep aid.

Findings

Results indicated a significant difference among active and passive conditions such that active exposures resulted in stronger positive preferences.

Research limitations/implications

Studies using different operationalizations should not be aggregated for generalizations about the effects of DTCA of prescription drugs.

Originality/value

This paper urges researchers to clearly operationalize their definitions for “exposure” and to be hesitant about generalizing findings studies using different definitions.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Eda Sayin and Zeynep Gürhan-Canlı

We propose that brands with strong associations and dedicated customers may be vulnerable if customers perceive them as exploiting their relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

We propose that brands with strong associations and dedicated customers may be vulnerable if customers perceive them as exploiting their relationship.

Methodology/approach

We start by reviewing the literature on brand meaning, brand attachment, brand relationships, and brand transgressions. The extant literature implies that as a result of their willingness to sustain their brand relationship, highly attached consumers will either discount negative information about a brand or attribute the responsibility for the negative information to some external factors. We propose, on the other hand, that when negative information dilutes the reason for brand attachment, the norm of the consumer–brand relationship is violated (brand transgression). Then we argue that highly attached consumers of that brand will react more negatively (when compared to consumers not feeling highly attached) toward the brand.

Findings

We introduce a typology of brand transgressions against the (1) expressive, (2) exclusive, (3) expert, and (4) empathic nature of brands. We discuss the possible effects of attachment levels on consumers’ reactions after such brand transgressions. Additionally, we articulate the moderating effects of four consumer motives (need for self-enhancement, need for uniqueness, need for risk avoidance, and need for justice) on consumer reactions.

Originality/value

Our reasoning counters the literature suggesting that highly attached consumers of a brand will engage in relationship-sustaining behaviors. We contribute to the brand-transgression literature by providing a more structured and detailed definition of brand transgressions by classifying them under four distinct types.

Details

Brand Meaning Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-932-5

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Natalia Trogen and Ugur Yavas

This study seeks to determine the relative importance of factors non‐profit hospital administrators rely on in their decisions to join a non‐profit multihospital…

1787

Abstract

This study seeks to determine the relative importance of factors non‐profit hospital administrators rely on in their decisions to join a non‐profit multihospital organization (MO) and their assessments of an MO in satisfying these motives. A related objective of the study is to determine whether or not the administrators of different types of hospitals (i.e. general vs specialty, member of a national vs non‐national MO and church‐affiliated vs non‐church affiliated) differ in their judgements. The analytical framework of the importance‐performance technique is used in analyzing the data gathered from the top administrators of a nation‐wide sample of hospitals in the USA. Results and implications of the study are discussed.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Jaimie P. Meyer, Jeffrey A. Wickersham, Jeannia J. Fu, Shan-Estelle Brown, Tami P. Sullivan, Sandra A. Springer and Frederick L. Altice

Little is known about the association of intimate partner violence (IPV) with specific HIV-treatment outcomes, especially among criminal justice (CJ) populations who are…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the association of intimate partner violence (IPV) with specific HIV-treatment outcomes, especially among criminal justice (CJ) populations who are disproportionately affected by IPV, HIV, mental, and substance use disorders (SUDs) and are at high risk of poor post-release continuity of care.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were used to describe the prevalence, severity, and correlates of lifetime IPV exposure among HIV-infected jail detainees enrolled in a novel jail-release demonstration project in Connecticut. Additionally, the effect of IPV on HIV treatment outcomes and longitudinal healthcare utilization was examined.

Findings

Structured baseline surveys defined 49 percent of 84 participants as having significant IPV exposure, which was associated with female gender, longer duration since HIV diagnosis, suicidal ideation, having higher alcohol use severity, having experienced other forms of childhood and adulthood abuse, and homo/bisexual orientation. IPV was not directly correlated with HIV healthcare utilization or treatment outcomes. In-depth qualitative interviews with 20 surveyed participants, however, confirmed that IPV was associated with disengagement from HIV care especially in the context of overlapping vulnerabilities, including transitioning from CJ to community settings, having untreated mental disorders, and actively using drugs or alcohol at the time of incarceration.

Originality/value

Post-release interventions for HIV-infected CJ populations should minimally integrate HIV secondary prevention with violence reduction and treatment for SUDs.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Jenny Barber, Sarah E Hillier, Geoff Middleton, Richard Keegan, Hannah Henderson and Jacquie Lavin

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility and benefits of providing weight management support via the workplace.

2802

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility and benefits of providing weight management support via the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Quasi-experimental design using non-random assignment to a 12-week Slimming World (SW) weight management programme, either within the workplace or at a regular community group. Weight was recorded weekly and a 39-item questionnaire focused on mental and emotional health, self-esteem, dietary habits and physical activity habits administered at baseline, 12 weeks, six and 12 months.

Findings

In total, 243 participants enroled (workplace n=129, community n=114) with 138 completers (defined as those weighing-in at baseline and attending at least once within the last four weeks; workplace n=76, community n=62). Completers reported a mean weight change of −4.9 kg±3.4 or −5.7 per cent±3.8. Mental and emotional health scores increased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks. Self-worth scores increased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks, six and 12 months. Healthy dietary habit scores increased and unhealthy dietary habit scores decreased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks, six and 12 months. Healthy physical activity habit scores improved (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks and six months. There were no significant differences between groups.

Research limitations/implications

Participant demographic was predominantly female (94 per cent) aged 42.3 years, with only 13 men participating.

Practical implications

The results support the use of a 12-week SW weight management programme as a credible option for employers wanting to support staff to achieve weight loss and improve psycho-social health outcomes which could lead to improvements in quality of life and work performance.

Originality/value

Provides evidence for the delivery of weight management support via the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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