Search results

1 – 8 of 8
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Ismail Badraoui, Ivo van der Lans, Youssef Boulaksil and Jack G.A.J. van der Vorst

This study investigates the impact of agri-food supply chains (AFSCs) characteristics on the antecedents of horizontal logistics collaboration (HLC). Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the impact of agri-food supply chains (AFSCs) characteristics on the antecedents of horizontal logistics collaboration (HLC). Specifically, the study compares the relationship between collaboration activities and outcomes for companies in and outside AFSCs.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a survey was used to collect data from different industries. Second, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were applied to compare the measurement and structural models from different industry categories.

Findings

The results support the premise that collaboration improves trust and commitment in the relationship, which in turn enhance satisfaction. The results also show the existence of a minor influence of AFSCs characteristics on HLC antecedents, in the form of an indirect impact of dedicated investments on commitment.

Practical implications

The factors having a significant influence on the collaboration outcomes and their respective effects are generally similar across food and nonfood supply chains, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary and collaboration experiences.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the body of knowledge on interfirm collaboration by considering the specificities of HLC. It also highlights the importance of conducting contingency research on collaborative experiences, as firms from different industry contexts operate under distinct operational conditions.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Mario Duarte Canever, Hans van Trijp and Ivo van der Lans

This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of different segmentation schemes as the basis of marketing strategy, with particular respect to supply‐chain decisions, and to…

Downloads
2922

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of different segmentation schemes as the basis of marketing strategy, with particular respect to supply‐chain decisions, and to propose a new procedure capable of combining benefits sought and features available.

Design/methodology/approach

In a study of buyers and consumers of beef in Brazil, segments based on three approaches were derived by hierarchical cluster analysis, fine‐tuned by K‐means cluster analysis. The outcome was evaluated for the viability and actionability of the preferred procedure, both objectively and through interviews with managers in the beef‐supply business.

Findings

The results revealed that a segmentation scheme combining benefits sought and features available yields more homogeneous and actionable segments, and has real promise as an input to the formulation and implementation of supply‐chain strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This promising innovation in market segmentation requires further study, and testing in the marketplace.

Practical implications

The proposed system is a usable aid to decision making.

Originality/value

The paper proposes an original approach to market segmentation.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Keith Crosier

Downloads
239

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Jo Carby‐Hall

Discusses the transfer of undertakings in the UK, referring to the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations of 1981, the Employment Rights Act 1996…

Downloads
2837

Abstract

Discusses the transfer of undertakings in the UK, referring to the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations of 1981, the Employment Rights Act 1996, and the Acquired Rights Directive 1977. Provides the raison d’etre of the Acquired Rights Directive and outlines how it was implemented in the UK. Talks about the confusing jurisprudence of the European and British courts, mentioning the European Court of Justice’s challenges to the directive, the 1994 proposals, amended 1997 proposals, the Commission’s memorandum of 1997 and the UK government’s consultation papers. Describes how the European Directive is applied and interpreted in relation to the Acquired Rights Directive and transfer of undertakings. Outlines the regulations controlling compulsory competitive tendering. Points out the obligation to inform and consult on the transfer of an undertaking and how the directive is enforced if this fails to occur. Notes the effect a relevant transfer has on existing collective agreements and the legal implications of dismissing employees by reason of the relevant transfer. Looks at the European Commission’s proposal for a directive on safeguarding employees’ rights in the event of transfer and the implications that would have on UK business. Concludes that a new directive is needed, building on the 1977 Directive but ironing out its inconsistencies.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Hugo Santana de Figueiredo Junior, Miranda P. M. Meuwissen, Ivo A. Van der Lans and Alfons G. J. M. Oude Lansink

Development studies rarely measure the impact of value chain strategies on performance. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the perceived contribution of strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

Development studies rarely measure the impact of value chain strategies on performance. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the perceived contribution of strategies to the performance of three honey value chains in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

The value chain structure-conduct-performance (SCP) framework was used to select strategies and two performance indicators, honey production growth and local value-added. In a conjoint study, experts were asked to judge the contribution to the two performance indicators of several hypothetical combinations of value chain strategies.

Findings

According to the experts, adoption of specialised technical assistance, sharing resources at the production step, increase in exports, and organic certification were the strategies which contributed the most to performance. Simulations suggested that some honey value chains could have greatly increased their performance with these higher pay-off strategies.

Research limitations/implications

Quantifying the perceived impact of individual strategies contributes to improved evaluation of development interventions.

Practical implications

Outcomes also show that conjoint analysis is a useful method for policy evaluations in data scarce situations.

Originality/value

The paper combines an extended SCP framework for strategy selection and conjoint analysis for strategy evaluation of value chains.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Jafar Jafari

Fieldwork is one of the hallmarks of anthropology. Almost all students of anthropology have geographical and cultural specializations, ranging from a small group to a…

Abstract

Fieldwork is one of the hallmarks of anthropology. Almost all students of anthropology have geographical and cultural specializations, ranging from a small group to a nation. Their interest areas are often identified or marked by real or putative boundaries; and it is within these boundaries that anthropologists have “founded” their own villages and tribes — “my village”, “my tribe.”

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Paul T.M. Ingenbleek and Ivo A. van der Lans

This article aims to address the relationship between price strategies and price‐setting practices. The first derive from a normative tradition in the pricing literature…

Downloads
21517

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to address the relationship between price strategies and price‐setting practices. The first derive from a normative tradition in the pricing literature and the latter from a descriptive tradition. Price strategies are visible in the market, whereas price‐setting practices are hidden behind the boundaries of an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The study deals with the relationship between price strategies and price‐setting practices that refer to the use of customer value, competition, and cost information. Hypotheses are tested on survey data on 95 small and medium‐sized manufacturing and service firms in The Netherlands.

Findings

The results show that price strategies and price‐setting practices are related because strategies are implemented through price‐setting practices. However, some firms do not pursue any of the strategies indicated by pricing theory, some firms engage in practices for no clear strategic reasons, and some firms insufficiently engage in appropriate practices to implement their strategic choices.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited to small companies. Researchers should examine why firms may not pursue any price strategy that is offered by pricing theory. They may also focus on organizational learning and pricing capabilities.

Practical implications

Managers need greater awareness about the price strategies they can use, should be cautious about a potential mismatch between price strategies and price‐setting practices, and should reassess whether their firms are capable of engaging in the appropriate practices.

Originality/value

Linking price strategies to price‐setting practices reduces conceptual confusion in the pricing literature and may help to specify the gap between pricing theory and practice.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Chavis Ketkaew, Peerapong Wongthahan and Amporn Sae-Eaw

Here the authors investigate the effects of a visual color cue (brown color) on saltiness expectations, emotional responses and purchase intention of commercial soy sauce products.

Abstract

Purpose

Here the authors investigate the effects of a visual color cue (brown color) on saltiness expectations, emotional responses and purchase intention of commercial soy sauce products.

Design/methodology/approach

The study enrolled 100 participates, and three sauce colors (light brown, medium brown and dark brown) were used as treatments in this experimental design research. The data analysis was done by a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach with repeated measures.

Findings

The findings indicated that, for the medium and dark brown sauces, the final model revealed a positive effect of sauce color intensity on saltiness expectation, a positive impact of saltiness expectation on emotion and a positive impact of emotion on purchase intention with statistically indifferent factor loadings. Hence, both the medium and dark brown colors soy sauces were the preferred choices for consumers. However, for the light brown color, the test result was unsatisfactory.

Originality/value

Several empirical studies have identified visual cues as useful for sodium reduction. However, from a marketing perspective, a causal relationship between the color intensity and a customer's purchase intention has not been explored in soy sauce products using an experimental design concept and SEM.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8