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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Ivana Adamson

The day‐to‐day operations in small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) tend to reach a bottleneck before the owner‐managers think of engaging an external expertise to help…

Abstract

The day‐to‐day operations in small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) tend to reach a bottleneck before the owner‐managers think of engaging an external expertise to help. By then the situation is often difficult to salvage, and management consultants tend to get blamed for the outcomes. In this study, 40 management consultants were asked to allow a researcher to be present during their first meeting with a potential client. Four agreed. The objective of this study was to evaluate a model of pre‐entry phase of consultancy behaviour against the real‐life interaction, in which two parties attempt to choose the best problem‐solving partner. The findings suggest that, far from management consultants and potential clients behaving in a rational way, as proposed by the pre‐entry phase model of consultancy, each partner brought into the interaction their personal agenda, therefore taking the interaction processes away from the “purely business” rational level, as present management literature suggests. This has some important implications for the research methodologies used to study SMEs.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Ivana Adamson

Sixty management consultants (30 with technical/scientific (T) background, and thirty with non‐technical (NT) background) operating in small companies (≤50 employees) were…

Abstract

Sixty management consultants (30 with technical/scientific (T) background, and thirty with non‐technical (NT) background) operating in small companies (≤50 employees) were administered the Management Consultant Style Inventory (MCSI), based on the Blake and Mouton Consulcube. This was to test whether consultants operating in small organisations tend to use similar or whether they have preferred styles of intervention. The results show that there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Statistically significant differences (based on age and gender) were found within the groups (for the T group, F4,29s at p <0.001, and the NT group F2,29 = 3.85s at p < 0.025). When taking into account subgroups with n = 7 or more, the most preferred intervention style was the Catalytic (T, male, 41−y, n = 15, mean score = 28 out of 40s.d. = 4.8), and the least preferred was the Prescriptive (NT, male, 41–50 years, n = 10, mean score = 21s.d. = 3.8). © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. and European Research Press Ltd.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Ivana Adamson and H.R. Seddighi

This study provides an analysis of two regional samples on R&D activities in manufacturing small and medium‐size firms in the UK. The results show that there are…

Abstract

This study provides an analysis of two regional samples on R&D activities in manufacturing small and medium‐size firms in the UK. The results show that there are statistically significant regional differences between the North East and the West Midlands (χr2 of 11.8 s.s. at p < .01), where the North East SMEs seem to engage less in R&D activities. The results may be of some interest to the relevant R&D funding bodies.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

“It's good to talk” was the much‐quoted slogan of a series of advertisements for UK telecommunications company, BT. Simple, effective, to the point and – well, blatantly obvious. It is good to talk, and while the phone company was emphasizing giving friends and relatives a ring for a chat, rather than engage in a conversation with a business associate to share intellectual concepts, talking is a major component in what has become to be known as knowledge management.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Ivana Adamson, Kok‐Mun Chan and Donna Handford

After the Chinese takeover of Hong Kong its smaller banks carved out a niche for themselves in the corporate market by embracing relationship marketing as a way of doing…

Abstract

After the Chinese takeover of Hong Kong its smaller banks carved out a niche for themselves in the corporate market by embracing relationship marketing as a way of doing business. Examines the commitment‐trust dimension of the relationship marketing paradigm in the Hong Kong’s corporate banking sector. The findings show that the Hong Kong banks’ marketing strategy and a long‐term orientation were positively correlated with customer commitment and trust; communications and relational norms were positively correlated with trust; relationship benefits were positively correlated with customer commitment; and the banks’ reputation was negatively correlated with trust and commitment. To continue to be successful in the corporate sector, smaller banks must invest in the long‐term relationship marketing infrastructures to support a customer‐oriented approach. To enhance the corporate customers’ confidence further, the banks must develop parallel communication channels with their customers, show flexibility in their dealings and maximize mutual relationship benefits by minimising drastic recovery actions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 21 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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