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Article

Ivan T. Robertson, Richard Bell and Golnaz Sadri

Previous research on the use of behaviour modelling techniques fortraining in industry have shown it to be generally effective. Further,more specific work has suggested…

Abstract

Previous research on the use of behaviour modelling techniques for training in industry have shown it to be generally effective. Further, more specific work has suggested that effectiveness might be improved by the use of techniques (symbolic coding and rehearsal) designed to improve trainees’ retention processes. This study examined the use of symbolic coding (learning points) and rehearsal techniques in behaviour modelling training. The data were derived from a field experiment conducted in a UK financial services organisation. Although, as expected, the behaviour modelling approach did produce effective learning the results showed that, contrary to hypotheses, variations in symbolic coding (different learning points conditions) and rehearsal did not influence training outcomes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Ivan T. Robertson, Alex Jansen Birch and Cary L. Cooper

This article aims to test the hypothesis that employee productivity levels will be better predicted by a combination of positive job and work attitudes (employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to test the hypothesis that employee productivity levels will be better predicted by a combination of positive job and work attitudes (employee engagement) and psychological well‐being than by positive job and work attitudes alone.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data using psychometrically sound measures of the key constructs were collected for a sample of over 9,000 people across 12 organisations.

Findings

Multiple regression analyses reveal that psychological well‐being has incremental value over and above that of positive job and work attitudes in predicting self‐reported levels of performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study design involves cross sectional self‐report data and as such firm conclusions about causality cannot be drawn.

Practical implications

The results suggest that if employers focus only on job and work attitudes and ignore employee psychological well‐being, they will limit the benefits that can be obtained through initiatives such as programmes designed to improve employee engagement.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence that two previously separate constructs are both important in predicting measures of employee productivity.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Ivan T. Robertson and Cary L. Cooper

By introducing the concept of “full engagement,” this article aims to propose that employee engagement is more likely to be sustainable when employee well‐being is also high.

Abstract

Purpose

By introducing the concept of “full engagement,” this article aims to propose that employee engagement is more likely to be sustainable when employee well‐being is also high.

Design/methodology/approach

Research evidence covering the separate concepts is reviewed and evidence of the benefits that both engagement and well‐being confer on organizations is presented.

Findings

Most current perspectives on employee engagement include little of direct relevance to well‐being and reflect a narrow, commitment‐based view of engagement. This view focuses too heavily on benefits to organizations. A broader conception of engagement (referred to as “full engagement”), which includes employee well‐being, is a better basis for building sustainable benefits for individuals and organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Research exploring the links between employee engagement and well‐being is needed to validate and develop the propositions put forward in this article.

Practical implications

A model for improving full engagement in organizations is presented and brief; case study illustrations are also given.

Originality/value

The integration of well‐being and commitment‐based engagement into the single construct of full engagement provides a novel perspective.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Andrew Kinder and Ivan T. Robertson

Explores the practical implications and the psychological meaning of thelinks between specific job competences and personality variables usingbiographical material from…

Abstract

Explores the practical implications and the psychological meaning of the links between specific job competences and personality variables using biographical material from the lives of famous people such as Anita Roddick, Sir John Harvey‐Jones, Lord Shaftesbury and Mikhail Gorbachev. Uses results from an earlier study, involving a meta‐analysis of personality data to provide an empirical base. Focuses on four areas: “creative/innovative”, “analysis and judgement”, “resilience” and “persuasiveness”.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Paul Iles

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and…

Abstract

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and focus on the assessment centre as a potentially useful technique in this respect, especially for managerial selection. I go on to examine the assessment centre in more detail, including its origins, construction and uses, before discussing the strong evidence for its validity as a selection and assessment procedure. I then describe some recent British innovations in assessment centre design and practice, especially in its use for management and organisation development purposes, before discussing some of my own recent research, in collaboration with Ivan Robertson and Usha Rout, on participants' attitudes towards the use of assessment centres for selection and development purposes, including gender differences in attitudes.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

Paul Iles, Ivan Robertson and Usharani Rout

A fair amount of evidence has been amassed concerning thereliability, validity and fairness of assessment centres when used forselection purposes. Selection‐oriented…

Abstract

A fair amount of evidence has been amassed concerning the reliability, validity and fairness of assessment centres when used for selection purposes. Selection‐oriented assessment centres provide valid predictions of managerial performance and success, and seem not to generate significant adverse impact against black or female candidates. Assessment centres increasingly, however, seem to be used for purposes other than immediate job selection. In particular, they are often used for the identification of long‐term managerial potential, and for the diagnosis of training and development needs, perhaps as a part of an overall audit of managerial strengths and weaknesses or as a part of a wider organisational development effort. Two studies of participants′ reactions to development centres are presented. These are followed by two longitudinal studies of the impact on a range of career and organisational attitudes held by participants of two development centres run by two major UK financial services organisations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Article

Cassandra Thompson and Samuel Lane

This study aims to evaluate both intelligence and job satisfaction of workers in the USA and China. Each topic will be studied individually, first, to determine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate both intelligence and job satisfaction of workers in the USA and China. Each topic will be studied individually, first, to determine the relationship between intelligence and job satisfaction. The statistics between China and the USA will then be compared and contrasted to assess how different cultures will affect emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of those in the workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the empirical studies on intelligence and job satisfaction was performed and used to develop a model to guide future research.

Findings

There is a negative relationship between intelligence and job satisfaction in the USA, but no studies have been done to compare both constructs cross-culturally.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed study can be used to gain an understanding of the relationship between intelligence and job satisfaction across different cultures.

Practical implications

The link between job satisfaction and intelligence can be used by employers to determine information about other aspects of their business, such as turnover rates of productive employees.

Originality/value

Although there has been some research on the relation between intelligence and job satisfaction, notably by Ganzach (1998), very little has been done across cultures.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article

Sobeida Margarita Giraldo, Luis Joyanes Aguilar, Lillyana María Giraldo and Iván Darío Toro

This paper aims to explore the requirements of organizational knowledge management initiatives using requirements engineering techniques, identifying the optimal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the requirements of organizational knowledge management initiatives using requirements engineering techniques, identifying the optimal techniques configuration and serving as a management tool for knowledge engineers.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is selection attributes. Knowledge management enablers are characterized and mapped with the coverage capabilities of requirements engineering techniques, using the attributes of the elicited object and a box-plot analysis. The information is gathered from 280 references, 32 companies and 16 experts in requirements engineering.

Findings

Requirements of organizational knowledge management initiatives are got optimally by combining interviews, use cases, scenarios, laddering and focus group techniques. The requirements of structure and processes are more complex to identify, while culture requirements are the best covered.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge management enablers are analyzed according to the current studies and comprehension of engineering techniques.

Practical implications

Knowledge engineers need to consider the coverage capabilities of engineering techniques to design an optimal requirement identification and meet the objectives of organizational knowledge acquisition initiatives. Requirement engineers can improve the requirements identification by a staged selection process.

Social implications

The requirements of knowledge management initiatives that impact the community can be identified and traced to ensure the knowledge objectives. Requirements related to culture and people, like shared values, beliefs, and behaviors, are also considered.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study about formal requirement identification of knowledge management initiatives in the organizational context, providing the optimal configuration. A novel staged process is proposed for requirements engineering techniques selection, analyzing the enablers at component level and identifying the attributes associated with the elicited object.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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