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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Barbara Gaudenzi, Ilenia Confente and Ivan Russo

This study aims to investigate the logistics service quality (LSQ) from a supply chain quality perspective. The purpose is twofold: (1) to investigate how business…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the logistics service quality (LSQ) from a supply chain quality perspective. The purpose is twofold: (1) to investigate how business customers perceive the LSQ dimensions in business-to-business (B2B) relationships, with a particular focus on the role of logistics service providers and (2) to analyse the manner in which such dimensions, when combined, lead to high levels of customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected through a survey of a sample of Italian food companies are analysed using a qualitative comparative analysis approach. The analysis explores ways of achieving customer satisfaction through different combinations of LSQ dimensions and not only via a “single recipe,” as in most symmetrical methods.

Findings

The study describes how seven dimensions of LSQ lead to achieve customer satisfaction, particularly highlighting and discussing how the different LSQ constructs lead to gain high customer satisfaction via different configurations. This approach is unique in identifying not only linear relationships among variables as traditional statistical methods do, via a configurational approach.

Research limitations/implications

Most academic studies in the related literature investigate service quality from a quality management and a supply chain management perspective. This study fills the existing gap in the analysis of B2B relationships, focusing on the role of third-party logistics (3PL) service providers.

Practical implications

The study presents useful implications for practitioners, describing several ways in which 3PL service providers can combine LSQ dimensions to perform a continuous improvement of customer experience and to gain higher levels of customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study fills the existing gap in the analysis of B2B relationships, using the lens of quality management and supply chain management perspectives, and focusing on the role of 3PL service providers.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Ivan Russo, Ilenia Confente and Ayman Omar

This paper aims to investigate the role of qualified professionals acting as facilitators. These intermediaries can help to reduce information asymmetry between the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of qualified professionals acting as facilitators. These intermediaries can help to reduce information asymmetry between the manufacturer and the customer and to transfer knowledge to evaluate the quality of a product or service before use by the customer.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a two-stage research design consisting of a qualitative study with semi-structured qualitative interviews. The results were used to conduct the second quantitative study using an empirical survey.

Findings

Using the information asymmetry and signaling theory, the facilitator in this study represents the partial receiver, whereas the manufacturer is the signaler, and the focus is on understanding the value and “signals” perceived by the receiver with respect to the manufacturer’s overall offerings.

Originality/value

The study provides a framework that highlights the main value driver categories that professional service providers consider important for value creation.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Ivan Russo, Nicolò Masorgo and David Gligor

Given increasing customer expectations and disturbances to product returns management, capabilities such as supply chain resilience (SCR) can complement service recovery…

Abstract

Purpose

Given increasing customer expectations and disturbances to product returns management, capabilities such as supply chain resilience (SCR) can complement service recovery strategies in retail supply chains. This study utilizes procedural justice theory (PJT) to conceptualize service recovery resilience as a capability that allows firms to meet customer requirements when dealing with disruptions, and empirically investigates its impact on procedural and interactional justice and customer outcomes (i.e. satisfaction and loyalty) in the context of product replacement.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs two scenario-based experiments using a sample of 368 customers to explore the outcomes associated with service recovery resilience.

Findings

The investigation shows more satisfied and loyal customers when a retail supply chain can overcome service recovery challenges through SCR. The study shows that customers evaluate not only the process itself, but also their interactions with the retailer. Specifically, procedural justice and interactional justice have a significant influence on these relationships.

Originality/value

This study proposes service recovery resilience as a concept that bridges service recovery theory with supply chain strategy in the unique context of product replacement. Further, this study also notes how information enhances customer satisfaction with the retailer's effort to address disturbances in the recovery process. Finally, this study informs managers on the capabilities needed to face new customers' needs.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Ivan Russo, Ilenia Confente, David Gligor and Nicola Cobelli

The purpose of this paper is to introduce qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to the field of supply chain management and provide a detailed roadmap that supply chain…

2481

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to the field of supply chain management and provide a detailed roadmap that supply chain researchers can utilize when applying this methodology.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection focused on the evaluation of product returns management practices as perceived by business customers who operate in a supplier–customer context. In order to analyze the data using the QCA approach, a multi-step analysis was developed.

Findings

The results indicate five solutions that lead to high levels of customer satisfaction. The existence of multiple sufficient configurations for customer satisfaction indicates equifinality because multiple alternative solutions can lead to the same outcome.

Research limitations/implications

The authors make a methodological contribution by applying the QCA method to the field of supply chain management and providing a detailed roadmap that supply chain researchers can utilize.

Practical implications

The authors provide managers five different and novel combinations of antecedents that lead to higher levels of customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study offers supply chain researchers a better understanding of when it is appropriate to use QCA and how to apply this methodology. From a theoretical perspective, past studies focused exclusively on the “net effects” of these antecedents, thus, did not capture the complexity of the relationships between these various antecedents and customer satisfaction. This is a noteworthy contribution as it highlights the complexity of the amalgam of relationships and factors that impact customer satisfaction within the context of reverse supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Ivan Russo, Ilenia Confente, David M. Gligor and Nicola Cobelli

This study investigated business-to-business (B2B) repeated purchase intent and its relationships with customer value and customer satisfaction. Additionally, it explored…

1848

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated business-to-business (B2B) repeated purchase intent and its relationships with customer value and customer satisfaction. Additionally, it explored the link between willingness to purchase again, switching costs and product returns management. Modern customers are more likely to switch suppliers; however, previous research suggests that this behaviour can be attenuated by a robust returns management experience. The purpose of this study was to provide a revised model of B2B repeated purchase intent that integrates the concept of product returns management and switching costs with existing B2B customer repurchase intent models.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a qualitative inquiry based on semi-structured interviews was conducted to test and develop a quantitative survey. Then a survey was then sent to business owners operating in the audiology industry. Finally, there were 317 responses.

Findings

The authors reveal the complex relationship between returns management and repeated purchase intent. Specifically, the authors’ results indicate that the effect of product returns on repurchase intent is opposite to the effect of customer value, depending on the value of customer value. The authors’ findings indicate that even when switching costs are low, firms can positively impact the intent to purchase again in the future if they increase the level of customer satisfaction. In addition, the authors’ findings indicate that in the context of B2B a high/low level of customer satisfaction does not trigger a positive effect of managing product returns on repurchase intent.

Originality/value

This study was the first to introduce the concept of product returns management to research on B2B repurchase intent.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

David Gligor, Javad Feizabadi, Ivan Russo, Michael J. Maloni and Thomas J. Goldsby

Scholars have recently begun to empirically evaluate the triple-A supply chain, which emphasizes concurrent capabilities in agility, adaptability and alignment across the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Scholars have recently begun to empirically evaluate the triple-A supply chain, which emphasizes concurrent capabilities in agility, adaptability and alignment across the supply chain to develop sustainable competitive advantage. Complexity theory suggests however that other combinations of triple-A capabilities may be equally effective, especially given a firm's strategic orientation relative to its market and its supply chain. Our research objective was to examine what combinations of these capabilities lead to the same outcome (i.e. high firm performance).

Design/methodology/approach

We collected 182 survey responses from a global sample of supply chain managers. Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) was employed to assess effective recipes of agility, adaptability, alignment, supply chain orientation, and market orientation.

Findings

Our results revealed four distinct “recipes” (i.e. combinations of agility, adaptability, alignment, supply chain orientation and market orientation) that lead to high levels of firm performance.

Originality/value

Our results indicate that firms currently do not necessarily have to concomitantly develop capabilities across all triple-A components. Considering the costs associated with developing each of these capabilities, the findings allow us to derive several theoretical and managerial insights.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2021

David Marius Gligor, Ismail Golgeci, Carla Rego, Ivan Russo, Sıddık Bozkurt, Terrance Pohlen, Brian Hiatt and Vipul Garg

The purpose of this paper is to build on recent efforts occurring within business-to-business (B2B) marketing research to advance methodological developments. As phenomena…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build on recent efforts occurring within business-to-business (B2B) marketing research to advance methodological developments. As phenomena within B2B relationships have become increasingly complex, marketing scholars have begun to point out the limitations associated with correlation-based methodological approaches and highlight the need for new developments in this area. One such development is the fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA).

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a literature review to examine the use of fsQCA in B2B marketing research.

Findings

First, the current manuscript presents the benefits that the application of fsQCA can offer to market researchers investigating B2B phenomena. Second, the paper presents the current state of fsQCA use within B2B marketing. Third, it suggests possible marketing B2B research topics that can be explored using fsQCA.

Originality/value

The study highlights the benefits of fsQCA, presents the current state of fsQCA use within B2B marketing and offers a rich future research agenda for B2B marketing scholars. This agenda can also help spur additional method developments in the discipline.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Ilenia Confente, Ivan Russo, Simone Peinkofer and Robert Frankel

While remanufactured products represent an increasingly researched phenomenon in the literature, not much is known about consumers' understanding and acceptance of such…

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Abstract

Purpose

While remanufactured products represent an increasingly researched phenomenon in the literature, not much is known about consumers' understanding and acceptance of such products. This study explores this issue in the context of the theory of perceived risk (TPR), investigating return policy leniency and distribution channel choice as potential factors to foster remanufactured products' sales.

Design/methodology/approach

This research utilizes an experimental design composed of a pre-test and a scenario-based main experiment to explore how return policy leniency might mitigate consumers' perceived risk and how their related purchase intention differs across two types of retail distribution channel structures (i.e. brick-and-mortar vs. online).

Findings

The investigation into the efficacy of return policy leniency within two retail distribution channel settings (i.e. brick-and-mortar vs. online) illustrates that providing a lenient return policy is an effective “cue” in increasing consumer purchase intention for remanufactured products. While prior literature has established that consumers value return policy leniency for new products, the authors provide empirical evidence that this preference also applies to remanufactured products. Notably, that return policy preference holds true in both channel settings (i.e. brick-and-mortar vs. online) under consideration. Additionally, and contrary to the authors’ predictions, consumers perceived remanufactured products sold via both channel settings as equally risky, thus highlighting that both are appropriate distribution channels for remanufactured products. Finally, while research on new products provides some initial guidance on consumer perceptions of quality and risk, the study provides empirical evidence into the difference of perceived risk with regard to new versus remanufactured products.

Originality/value

By employing the TPR, this research explored the role played by two supply chain management related factors (returns policy and channel structure) in reducing consumer's perceived risk and increasing purchase intention. In doing so, this study answers the call for more consumer-based supply chain management research in a controlled experimental research setting.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Benjamin T. Hazen, Ivan Russo, Ilenia Confente and Daniel Pellathy

Circular economy (CE) initiatives are taking hold across both developed and developing nations. Central to these initiatives is the reconfiguration of core supply chain…

9544

Abstract

Purpose

Circular economy (CE) initiatives are taking hold across both developed and developing nations. Central to these initiatives is the reconfiguration of core supply chain management (SCM) processes that underlie current production and consumption patterns. This conceptual article provides a detailed discussion of how supply chain processes can support the successful implementation of CE. The article highlights areas of convergence in hopes of sparking collaboration among scholars and practitioners in SCM, CE, and related fields.

Design/methodology/approach

This article adopts a theory extension approach to conceptual development that uses CE as a “method” for exploring core processes within the domain of SCM. The article offers a discussion of the ways in which the five principles of CE (closing, slowing, intensifying, narrowing, dematerialising loops) intersect with eight core SCM processes (customer relationship management, supplier relationship management, customer service management, demand management, order fulfilment, manufacturing flow management, product development and commercialization, returns management).

Findings

This article identifies specific ways in which core SCM processes can support the transition from traditional linear approaches to production and consumption to a more circular approach. This paper results in a conceptual framework and research agenda for researchers and practitioners working to adapt current supply chain processes to support the implementation of CE.

Originality/value

This article highlights key areas of convergence among scholars and practitioners through a systematic extension of CE principles into the domain of SCM. In so doing, the paper lays out a potential agenda for collaboration among these groups.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2018

David Gligor, Siddik Bozkurt, Ivan Russo and Ayman Omar

Although supply chain scholars have acknowledged the fundamental disruptive changes experienced by today’s supply chains and the ensuing novelty of the research problems…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although supply chain scholars have acknowledged the fundamental disruptive changes experienced by today’s supply chains and the ensuing novelty of the research problems worthy of investigation, they have primarily relied on a limited number of theories to help explain the phenomena of interest. The purpose of this paper is to use a systematic literature review to address this gap and propose additional theories that supply chain researchers can use to help address novel supply chain phenomena, such as those caused by technological disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a systematic literature review to examine the studies published over the last 10 years in six of the top supply chain management journals (411 articles) and six of the top marketing and management journals (1,214 articles).

Findings

First, the findings show that 15 theories have been relied upon by over 95 per cent of the studies within supply chain management that use formal theories. Second, the authors identify the most frequently used theories within marketing and management (217 theories). Third, as space limitations make it impossible to offer a rich description of each of the 217 theories, the authors identify 30 theories that they considered to be the most salient to supply chain research and suggest areas where supply chain scholars can apply these theoretical lenses.

Originality/value

The research effort allowed the authors to map the current use of theories within the field to gain a better understanding of what other theories could augment the body of theories used within supply chain management. Thus, the current study is a “one stop shop” that supply chain scholars can consult when in a quandary about what theoretical lens to utilize.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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