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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Zahra Saki, Marguerite Moore, Ivan Kandilov, Lori Rothenberg and A. Blanton Godfrey

The purpose of this study is to identify US textile and apparel (TAP) products and categories that demonstrate export comparative advantage and their respective country…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify US textile and apparel (TAP) products and categories that demonstrate export comparative advantage and their respective country destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Revealed comparative advantage (RCA) and normalized revealed comparative advantage (NRCA) in the long term (1996-2016) and short term (2010-2016) using two-digit Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System codes (HS codes) provide an insight into export advantage of TAP products. Non-parametric rank correlation (i.e. Spearman rank correlation) tests consistency between RCA and NRCA. Subsequently, NRCA using four-digit HS codes identify textile sub-categories with export comparative advantage. Bilateral trade data identify export destinations for sub-categories that indicate US export comparative advantage in the short term.

Findings

Aggregated product-level comparison of RCA and NRCA ranking indicates a consistent positive correlation between the two indices. The disaggregated findings reveal cotton fiber HS5201, artificial filament tow HS5502, non-wovens HS5603, cotton yarn HS5205, carpet and other floor coverings HS5703 and worn clothing HS6309 as sources of US TAP export advantage.

Originality/value

This research provides a comprehensive, current analysis of the US competitive position within the TAP global environment. Incorporation of NRCA into the study’s design demonstrates the flexibility of this measure in a new industry context.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Robert Kenny and Charles Kenny

Governments around the world are providing multi‐billion dollar subsidies to roll out fiber to the home (FTTH) to enable superfast broadband (50 Mbps and above). The

Abstract

Purpose

Governments around the world are providing multi‐billion dollar subsidies to roll out fiber to the home (FTTH) to enable superfast broadband (50 Mbps and above). The premise for this is a belief that superfast broadband brings substantial economic and societal benefits. This paper's purpose is to examine whether this belief is well founded.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors critically review the arguments most commonly made in favor of FTTH, examining their logic and underlying evidence.

Findings

The paper finds that these arguments often inappropriately use benefits of basic broadband to make the case for the upgrade to superfast broadband, or use the benefits of providing superfast to business premises to argue for providing superfast to homes. The authors find the evidence that basic broadband brings economic growth is patchy, and that frequently studies that argue for a link do not adequately distinguish between correlation and causation.

Originality/value

Thus the authors conclude that the conventional wisdom that FTTH will bring substantial economic and societal benefits and therefore deserves a subsidy is, at best, much overstated. The case has simply not been made that FTTH has sufficient incremental externalities over other forms of broadband. This is an important conclusion for politicians, policy makers, telecoms providers and taxpayers, and suggests that billions of dollars of public money may be being wasted.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Lei Ru and Wei Si

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) in China’s sugar manufacturing industry using firm-level data from 2002/2003 to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) in China’s sugar manufacturing industry using firm-level data from 2002/2003 to 2012/2013 crushing seasons, and further explore the determinants of TFEE.

Design/methodology/approach

Modified data envelopment analysis is used to measure the TFEE of each sugar mill during the crushing seasons. Then heteroskedastic fractional probit model is applied to estimate the determinants of TFEE because of the bounded nature of TFEE and heteroskedasticity of unbalanced panel.

Findings

The results show that throughout the crushing seasons, the average TFEE is 0.57; there are spatial differences of TFEE in Guangxi sugar industry, highest in southern area; the TFEE of foreign-owned sugar mills is larger than that of private-owned and state-owned sugar mills; the larger the enterprise size, the higher the TFEE; private ownership, large size, raw material, safe productivity, total recovery rate as well as technical progress can improve TFEE significantly.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes TFEE using a rich data set at firm level, allowing the existence of firm heterogeneity, as well as being complementary to the study of energy efficiency in China’s sugar industry. Moreover, ownership structure is involved in the determinants of TFEE, which is rarely done in literature. Lastly, heteroskedastic fractional probit model is employed to recognize the bounded nature of TFEE as well as selection bias of unbalanced panel to study the determinants of TFEE.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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