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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Zixiang Li, Mukund Nilakantan Janardhanan, Peter Nielsen and Qiuhua Tang

Robots are used in assembly lines because of their higher flexibility and lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to develop mathematical models and simulated annealing…

Abstract

Purpose

Robots are used in assembly lines because of their higher flexibility and lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to develop mathematical models and simulated annealing algorithms to solve the robotic assembly line balancing (RALB-II) to minimize the cycle time.

Design/methodology/approach

Four mixed-integer linear programming models are developed and encoded in CPLEX solver to find optimal solutions for small-sized problem instances. Two simulated annealing algorithms, original simulated annealing algorithm and restarted simulated annealing (RSA) algorithm, are proposed to tackle large-sized problems. The restart mechanism in the RSA methodology replaces the incumbent temperature with a new temperature. In addition, the proposed methods use iterative mechanisms for updating cycle time and a new objective to select the solution with fewer critical workstations.

Findings

The comparative study among the tested algorithms and other methods adapted verifies the effectiveness of the proposed methods. The results obtained by these algorithms on the benchmark instances show that 23 new upper bounds out of 32 tested cases are achieved. The RSA algorithm ranks first among the algorithms in the number of updated upper bounds.

Originality/value

Four models are developed for RALBP-II and their performance is evaluated for the first time. An RSA algorithm is developed to solve RALBP-II, where the restart mechanism is developed to replace the incumbent temperature with a new temperature. The proposed methods also use iterative mechanisms and a new objective to select the solution with fewer critical workstations.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

David Ballantyne

The purpose of this article is to provide an understanding of the methodology of action research, especially its use in a marketing context. A retrospective account of a…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to provide an understanding of the methodology of action research, especially its use in a marketing context. A retrospective account of a market‐oriented action research project in which the author was involved is provided in the form of a summative evaluation of the methodology used. The status of research claims for action research in scholarly publications is discussed and found to be problematic. A hermeneutic case research pathway is recommended as a solution. Links between action research as methodology and internal marketing as strategy are made. A conclusion is reached that the basis of market‐oriented action research is “knowledge renewal”. This is achieved through an iterative process of action and learning, facilitated by the relationships formed between those involved.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Martin Sexton, Jack Goulding, Xiaonan Zhang, Mike Kagioglou, Ghassan Aouad, Rachel Cooper and Peter Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to identify interdependent barriers to the search and selection of new technologies by design engineers at industry, organisation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify interdependent barriers to the search and selection of new technologies by design engineers at industry, organisation and individual levels. A “proof of concept” HyCon tool is presented to demonstrate the role of information technology design support tools in supporting designers to overcome these inhibitors, in this case for hybrid concrete, by providing immersive and interactive, information‐rich environments to explore design solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The HyCon tool was developed through a prototyping methodology encompassing a testing, analysis, design and coding iterative cycle. This was supported by case studies and industry workshops.

Findings

The results of a collaborative research project are presented, which describes the HyCon design support tool to promote the understanding and use of hybrid concrete in structural frames. This tool is built around a knowledge creation, application, storage, and retrieval cycle to envision and support the use of this new technology.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to integrate technology management and design process considerations within the context of an information technology design support tool, and offers a “proof of concept” HyCon tool to demonstrate key issues and potential utilities and applications.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Rafael Carlos, Daniel C. Amaral and Mauro Caetano

Roadmapping has been used as an approach to support market, product and technology-integrated planning, resulting in a document commonly known as a roadmap. Despite the…

Abstract

Purpose

Roadmapping has been used as an approach to support market, product and technology-integrated planning, resulting in a document commonly known as a roadmap. Despite the gains made in relation to the technique, recent studies indicate that most users leave or have difficulties in sustaining the process (i.e. maintaining the updated roadmaps). This paper aims to present a framework for continuous roadmap updating that incorporates principles from agile management fields.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was developed through action research in a manufacturing firm in the construction industry.

Findings

The results demonstrate a positive impact on the degree of continuous information monitoring, roadmap credibility and use of the roadmap during innovation strategy decisions.

Originality/value

The key contribution of this framework is the demonstration of a new strategy for carrying out the maps in which information is internalized by the organization itself, using agile teams, without commissioned specialists and as part of the work standards.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Rick Edgeman

The purpose of this paper is to improve the ability of enterprises to routinely realize peak performance and produce positive social and environmental impact.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the ability of enterprises to routinely realize peak performance and produce positive social and environmental impact.

Design/methodology/approach

An acknowledged operational excellence model – the one behind the globally recognized Shingo Prize for Operational Excellence – is examined in relation to positive reciprocal behavior and the value of creating and reinforcing processes that “pile good upon good” in form of virtuous improvement cycles.

Findings

Embedding virtuous reciprocity cycles in enterprise culture and routines can help to routinize peak performance.

Research limitations/implications

Only the Shingo Operational Excellence Model is examined so that other well-known alternatives such as the Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence Model and EFQM Excellence Model are not examined. That said, the general structure and content of most excellence models is sufficiently similar that the approach taken herein would likely yield analogous conclusions.

Practical implications

Inherent in “practices” is that enterprises seek to routinize successful approaches to performance and impact, usually via contextualized implementation of excellence models or “programs” such as lean enterprise.

Social implications

Offered is one means of creating more positive enterprise cultures. Enterprises with more positive cultures have been shown to also be more productive and to contribute more positively to the fabric of society so that the “piling of good upon good” can extend beyond the borders of the enterprise.

Originality/value

The contribution herein is one of demonstrating why and how virtuous cycles can be implemented to more routinely yield improved or peak performance.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Research-practice Partnerships for School Improvement: The Learning Schools Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-571-0

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Theresa G. Mercer, Andrew P. Kythreotis, Zoe P. Robinson, Terje Stolte, Sharon M. George and Stephanie K. Haywood

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study on the creation, development and utilisation of educational games by university students is presented. The paper discusses the case study in the context of Kolb’s experiential learning and dynamic matching model, Perry’s stages of intellectual development and Beech and Macintosh’s processual learning model. The data used were from questionnaire feedback from the pupils who played the games and students who designed the games. Further qualitative feedback was collected from local schools involved in playing the games created by the students.

Findings

Overall, the students responded positively to the assessment and would like to see more of this type of assessment. They enjoyed the creativity involved and the process of developing the games. For the majority of the skill sets measured, most students found that their skills improved slightly. Many students felt that they had learnt a lot about effectively communicating science. The school children involved in playing the student-created games found them accessible with variable degrees of effectiveness as engaging learning tools dependent on the game.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a new approach to ESD which incorporates learner-centred arrangements within a full life cycle of game creation, delivery, playing and back to creation. The games can be used as a tool for enhancing knowledge and influencing behaviours in school children whilst enhancing ESD capacity in schools. The assessment also helps forge important links between the academic and local communities to enhance sustainable development.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Bruce Gurd and Panayiotis Ifandoudas

– The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how agility as a central focus of an organization can be achieved through a modified balanced scorecard (BSC) system.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how agility as a central focus of an organization can be achieved through a modified balanced scorecard (BSC) system.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research approach in a single organization is used to investigate the practicality and usefulness of an agility-focused BSC.

Findings

While the theory of constraints (TOC)-based approach was improving agility, it is too short-term. Using a BSC, based on agility principles, staff in the organization had their direction focused on drivers of important strategic issues and enabled a more agile environment.

Practical implications

Managers using the TOC have a way forward to use the TOC system, but build a performance measurement system that leads to agility and more sustained competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The role of a BSC in enabling agility in an environment using TOC has not been previously investigated.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Hussein Haruna, Zamzami Zainuddin, Robin R. Mellecker, Samuel K.W. Chu and Xiao Hu

Digital technology has great potential for educating today’s digitally oriented adolescents on health. In particular, digital health gamified learning can make the…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital technology has great potential for educating today’s digitally oriented adolescents on health. In particular, digital health gamified learning can make the promotion of the sexual well-being of adolescents more effective. Although venereal diseases such as HIV/AIDS have become a greater problem in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries than in any country outside of Africa, little is publicly known about the development of gamified learning for use in counter-measures. This paper aims to address that deficit by presenting the process of developing one such game. The paper highlights how the “My Future Begins Today” game for sexual health education was developed, evaluated and refined in the real-world of low-tech settings and made improvements based on the response of users.

Design/methodology/approach

Design-based research (DBR) was used to guide the design, develop, test and refine the digital game in iterative cycles. The evaluation of the effectiveness of iterations of the game was done using adolescent sexual health literacy tests and the validated Motivation, Attitude, Knowledge and Engagement framework, the authors developed based on existing approaches. That framework combines the elements of motivation, attitude, knowledge and engagement, effectiveness was evaluated based on the game’s ability to motivate students, improve their attitudes, increase their acquisition of knowledge and engage them in learning self-rating surveys and interviews. The whole process of game design, testing, evaluation and refinement were underpinned by the activity theory, DBR and participatory design (PD) research.

Findings

Participants in the gamified learning platforms demonstrated higher average scores on their post-tests than their counterparts subjected to the traditional teaching classroom. Also, gamified learning groups commented positively on the effectiveness of their instructional approach than their counterparts in the traditional learning group. The stakeholders’ involvement in developing gamified learning provided a good understanding of the importance of the game to the adolescent students and how it was going to be used to address the problem identified. The application of PD contributed to the effectiveness of the game. It involved various actors from various fields who were relevant to the game. Also, engaging targeted users from the beginning resulted in the creation of a better correspondence with the preferences of end-users.

Practical implications

This study has contributed to a better understanding of sex education and knowledge in the area of adolescent reproductive health issues, using developed innovative game mechanics features and its applicability in low-tech settings.

Originality/value

The study will be a recommendation for future researchers in applying this gamified learning concept and its suitability in their teaching practice, particularly regarding sexual health education and adolescent reproductive health issues in low-tech settings of SSA.

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Chih-Hao Chen and Siva Nadarajah

This paper aims to present a dynamically adjusted deflated restarting procedure for the generalized conjugate residual method with an inner orthogonalization (GCRO) method.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a dynamically adjusted deflated restarting procedure for the generalized conjugate residual method with an inner orthogonalization (GCRO) method.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed method uses a GCR solver for the outer iteration and the generalized minimal residual (GMRES) with deflated restarting in the inner iteration. Approximate eigenpairs are evaluated at the end of each inner GMRES restart cycle. The approach determines the number of vectors to be deflated from the spectrum based on the number of negative Ritz values, k∗.

Findings

The authors show that the approach restores convergence to cases where GMRES with restart failed and compare the approach against standard GMRES with restarts and deflated restarting. Efficiency is demonstrated for a 2D NACA 0012 airfoil and a 3D common research model wing. In addition, numerical experiments confirm the scalability of the solver.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an extension of dynamic deflated restarting into the traditional GCRO method to improve convergence performance with a significant reduction in the memory usage. The novel deflation strategy involves selecting the number of deflated vectors per restart cycle based on the number of negative harmonic Ritz eigenpairs and defaulting to standard restarted GMRES within the inner loop if none, and restricts the deflated vectors to the smallest eigenvalues present in the modified Hessenberg matrix.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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