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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Paolo Passarini, Alessio Cavicchi, Cristina Santini and Gabriele Mazzantini

The Italian legislature GAVE to the Italian Competition Authority has an increasingly prominent role for the consumer protection over the years, especially giving the…

Abstract

Purpose

The Italian legislature GAVE to the Italian Competition Authority has an increasingly prominent role for the consumer protection over the years, especially giving the possibility to impose fines against companies. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the Italian system of consumer protection, studying the impact of these fines on the Italian agrifood companies till 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory approach was used in order to formulate new hypothesis from emerging data. Information and data were collected through several sources: interviews with key informants of ICA, secondary data from ICA database, a survey run among companies that received a penalty from ICA during the period 2007-2012, companies website, LexisNexis database and National print and web media titles.

Findings

From the analysis it emerges that there is an accurate system planned for avoiding and limiting misleading practices. Firms in fact have been capable to adapt to the set of imposed rules and to reduce the efficacy of the proposed dissuasive system.

Originality/value

The originality of this study regards the way in which the consumer protection was investigated, in fact it takes into account the relationships between ICA and IAP, two of the most important players of consumer protection in Italy. Moreover, the study is focussed on the agrifood sector. The authors give some recommendations for future interventions focussing on the length of time of the process, which could have a positive impact on the effectiveness of sanctions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Gianluca Ginesti, Adele Caldarelli and Annamaria Zampella

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of intellectual capital (IC) on the reputation and performance of Italian companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of intellectual capital (IC) on the reputation and performance of Italian companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper exploits a unique data set of 452 non-listed companies that obtained a reputational assessment from the Italian Competition Authority (ICA). To test the hypotheses, this study implemented several regression analyses.

Findings

Results support the argument that human capital efficiency is a key driver of corporate reputation. Findings also reveal that companies, which obtained reputational rating under ICA scrutiny, show a positive relationship between IC elements and various measures of financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on a single country; it is not free from the imprecisions of Pulic’s VAIC model.

Practical implications

This paper recommends companies that are interested to achieve a robust reputation should consider the human capital as a strategic intangible asset. Second, the results suggest that companies with an ICA reputational rating are able to leverage their intangibles to potentiate performance and competitiveness.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical investigation on the contribution of IC in generating value for corporate reputation. Additionally, the study contributes to the literature on the link between IC and performance by examining a sample of firms not yet explored in prior research.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Simona Romani

The aim of the research reported is to investigate consumers'reactions to advertisements containing misleading information on price. The underlying thesis is that such…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research reported is to investigate consumers'reactions to advertisements containing misleading information on price. The underlying thesis is that such advertising generates negative consumer reactions in terms of attitude and intention and that these are heightened in the presence of suspicion.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was employed to identify the most frequently used misleading price communication strategies in Italy, and subsequently, an experimental study examined consumer response to a selection of advertisements that rely on these.

Findings

The qualitative study allows for the development of a typology of eight different misleading price communication practices which includes those based on the provision of purely false information alongside those employing an unclear or incomplete application of complex price communication strategies. The experimental study reveals that, when price information is communicated using misleading practices, consumers develop lower levels of trustworthiness toward the source of information as well as willingness to buy. Furthermore, these effects are heightened in the presence of suspicion.

Research limitations/implications

These results provide evidence that consumers may react unfavourably to misleading price information. In addition, the research demonstrates that this negative response is greater for suspicious rather than non‐suspicious consumers.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing body of literature that demonstrates consumers' negative reactions to unclear and incomplete price information generated by the misleading usage of complex price communication strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Ciro Troise, Aidan O'Driscoll, Mario Tani and Anna Prisco

This research leverages an integrated framework that uses the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to analyse the main drivers of…

Abstract

Purpose

This research leverages an integrated framework that uses the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to analyse the main drivers of users' intention to use food delivery apps. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consumer's willingness to adopt online food delivery (OFD) using the models' constructs and extend them to consider food choices, convenience, trust and the effect of the perceived risks related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic as contextual factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts the partial least squares approach to structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to examine the data. The final sample consists of 425 people in Italy.

Findings

The authors have found that combining the TAM and the TPB provides a valid and significant model that can be used to understand OFD users' behavioural intentions. Moreover, the results show that subjective norms have a stronger effect on behavioural intentions than the personal attitude and that trustworthiness and the perception of risks related to COVID-19 have different effects. Accordingly, the authors derive several theoretical and managerial implications from these results.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the current debate on consumer behaviour in the OFD context. Only a few studies have integrated the TAM and TPB models in this context. This paper sheds light on the factors useful in predicting people's choice to buy food via OFD. Furthermore, it highlights the key role of some contextual factors and subjective norms over more technical ones.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Gianluca Ginesti

This study aims to explore the relationship between top management characteristics and intellectual capital (IC) performance of small companies.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relationship between top management characteristics and intellectual capital (IC) performance of small companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research offers an empirical investigation into a unique sample of 135 small Italian companies, which have been recognised as meeting legal values. This study uses a regression analysis to test whether CEO age, CEO connections and management team size affect IC performance.

Findings

Companies managed by CEOs with higher levels of connections and with a greater number of managers exhibit improved IC performance. In addition, this study provides evidence that companies with older CEOs demonstrate better IC efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not consider all top management-specific factors and incentives that may affect IC performance and uses a limited sample of companies.

Practical implications

This study suggests that increased network activity and larger management teams are beneficial for small companies to improve the efficiency of IC used.

Originality/value

The work offers novel empirical evidence to understand what governance and management-specific factors affect the efficiency in managing IC assets in small companies.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Prem Sikka

This paper aims to argue that enterprise culture is producing negative effects. Companies and major accountancy firms are increasingly willing to increase their profits…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that enterprise culture is producing negative effects. Companies and major accountancy firms are increasingly willing to increase their profits through indulgence in price fixing, tax avoidance/evasion, bribery, corruption, money laundering and practices that show scant regard for social norms and even laws.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper locates business behaviour within the broader dynamics of capitalism to argue that hunger for higher profits at almost any cost is not constrained by rules, laws and even periodic regulatory action.

Findings

The paper uses publicly available evidence to show that accountancy firms are engaged in anti‐social behaviour. Evidence is provided to show that in pursuit of higher profits firms have operated cartels, engaged in tax avoidance/evasion, bribery, corruption and money laundering.

Practical implications

The paper seeks to bring the anti‐social activities of accountancy firms under scrutiny and thus extend possibilities of research in social responsibility, ethics, accountability, claims of professionalism, social disorder and crime.

Originality/value

It is rare for accounting scholars to examine predatory practices of accounting firms. It shows that predatory practices affect a variety of arenas and stakeholders.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Khojasteh Rahimpour, Hadi Shirouyehzad, Milad Asadpour and Mehdi Karbasian

The purpose of this study is to propose a model to evaluate the performance of organizational units considering intellectual capital (IC) and employee loyalty approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a model to evaluate the performance of organizational units considering intellectual capital (IC) and employee loyalty approach applying principal component analysis and data envelopment analysis (PCA-DEA) method.

Design/methodology/approach

Organization units are considered as decision-making units, IC components including human capital (HC), structural capital (SC) and customer capital are inputs and employee loyalty is output. The principal component analysis was used to converts inputs and outputs into the independent variables. As a return to scale is variable, a modified envelopment input-oriented BCC model applied to obtain the efficiency of organization units. Also, all units of organization are ranked. Eventually, sensitivity analysis performed to show how input variables influence on output variable.

Findings

Operation, design and construction, production planning, internal affairs, quality control and security were recognized as efficient units. Also, units of operation, internal affairs and quality control ranked first to third, and the human resource unit earned the last rank. In addition, results of sensitivity analysis on input variables showed that the order of impact intensity is: customer capital, HC and SC, respectively.

Originality/value

Existence a framework for the development of human resource strategies and prioritization in the allocation of organizational resources to improve the performance of the organization considering human resources is vital. Most of the previous studies, just have examined the impact of IC on different dimensions of organizational performance. Meanwhile, evaluating the performance of IC with employee loyalty approach, using PCA-DEA simultaneously can evaluate and measure the impact of IC on the performance of the organization and its units regarding employee loyalty, which has a significant impact on improving the organization’s level of IC and human resource management.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Abstract

Details

Strategic Corporate Communication in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-264-5

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Caitlin Candice Ferreira, Jeandri Robertson and Marnell Kirsten

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the philosophical considerations of fake news and provide an alternative view to current conceptualizations of its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the philosophical considerations of fake news and provide an alternative view to current conceptualizations of its binary nature. Through an evaluation of existing research, a typology of fake news is presented that considers the possibility that the propagation of fake news about a brand, may be stemming from the brand itself, a previously unexplored field in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper based on extensive literature review on the fields of fake news and knowledge creation, resulting in the creation of a synthesized typology.

Findings

The role of power structures greatly influences the ability for a brand to respond to fake news. Externally constructed disinformation is seemingly more difficult for a brand to address, as a result of having limited control over the message. Internally constructed information, while stemming from the brand itself provides the brand with more control, but a greater public distrust as the source of the fake news seems to confirm the disinformation.

Practical implications

This paper presents a typology that contrasts the source of the construction of disinformation and the extent to which the facts have been fabricated. Furthermore, this paper provides future researchers with an alternate understanding of the conceptualization of fake news.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind to establish a typology of fake news on the basis of the source of construction of disinformation. The source plays an important role when assessing the associated brand risks and developing an approach to combat potential negative implications.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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