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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Ebenezer Adaku, Nii A. Ankrah and Issaka E. Ndekugri

The prevention through design (PtD) initiative places a duty on designers to originate designs that are inherently safe for construction, maintenance, occupation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevention through design (PtD) initiative places a duty on designers to originate designs that are inherently safe for construction, maintenance, occupation and demolition. In the UK, legislation has been introduced creating a new statutory role called the principal designer (PD) to ensure that PtD occurs during the design process. To realize this objective, PDs under the regulations must have appropriate skills, knowledge and experience (SKE) of occupational safety and health risks as they relate to construction products. However, there is a paucity of knowledge, in the extant literature and in practice, regarding what specifically constitutes PDs’ SKE of PtD and how to measure the same.

Design/methodology/approach

The study undertook a systematic review of meanings of SKE and carried out content analyses to provide robust conceptualizations of the constructs SKE. This underpinned the development of nomological networks to operationalize the constructs SKE in respect of PDs’ ability to ensure PtD.

Findings

PDs’ SKE of PtD are presented as multidimensional constructs that can be operationalized at different levels of specificity in three theoretical models.

Practical implications

The models indicated in this study can assist project clients to clarify the PtD SKE of prospective PDs in the procurement process. Correspondingly, PDs can look to these frameworks to identify their SKE gaps and take steps to address them.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the PtD literature by providing theoretical frameworks to clarify the PtD SKE of PDs. The study provides a basis for future research to empirically test the attributes of these as they relate to PDs’ competence to ensure PtD.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Dingayo Mzyece, Issaka E. Ndekugri and Nii A. Ankrah

Building information modelling (BIM) has received wide coverage within the research, academic and industry communities over the last decade. Yet, its degree of integration…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) has received wide coverage within the research, academic and industry communities over the last decade. Yet, its degree of integration with various industry standards in the architecture, engineering and construction sector varies extensively. An exploratory research approach explores the interoperability between the construction design and management (CDM) regulations and BIM. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design comprised: a methodical “state-of-the-art” review of extant literature – exploring some 19 variables emerging from the literature review; detailed content analyses of the current CDM regime (CDM 2015); and conducting a “test” to map and determine the degree of interoperability between BIM and CDM. The study develops several meta-matrices and a framework for BIM and CDM interoperability.

Findings

New insight reveals that BIM provides a systematic approach for the discharge of CDM obligations. The framework developed is easily transferable into BIM common data environments (CDEs) and offers an expeditious discharge of CDM obligations.

Research limitations/implications

Some features of the developed BIM/CDM interoperability framework invite further tests to predicate the degree of discharge of CDM obligations. Duties related to provision of pre-construction information invite further research.

Originality/value

Little research provides insight into the interoperability of BIM and the CDM regulations. Therefore, this study contributes to the knowledge relating to the degree of interoperability of BIM in construction systems, processes and standards.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

ISSAKA NDEKUGRI and BARRY MCDONNELL

A new edition of the FIDIC Red Book is under discussion. It is an issue whether this edition should be based on the current edition or there should be a complete break…

1265

Abstract

A new edition of the FIDIC Red Book is under discussion. It is an issue whether this edition should be based on the current edition or there should be a complete break with tradition in favour of a contract based on a new philosophy such as that of the NEC, which is reported to be used in many countries in circumstances in which the Red Book would otherwise have been used. This article compares the two contracts on the way they deal with site conditions issues. The comparison is on equity and clarity in risk allocation, adequacy of contractual procedures for dealing with unforeseeable conditions encountered, effectiveness of contractual machinery for dispute resolution, and compliance with reported new developments in successful contractual practices in underground construction. Studies highlighting the recurring frequency of claims for unforeseen ground conditions suggest a need for such particular attention to this aspect of construction. Although a desire for some equity in risk sharing is discernible in both contracts, there is room for improvement in the clarity of both contracts. Each contract has commendable features which are not present in the other. However, a better approach involves a combination of these features with full compliance of the reported modern developments in successful contracting practices.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Issaka Ndekugri, Hannah Daeche and Diwei Zhou

Project insurance is designed to get over the perceived deficiencies of the conventional insurance practice. It involves the entire project supply chain being insured…

1399

Abstract

Purpose

Project insurance is designed to get over the perceived deficiencies of the conventional insurance practice. It involves the entire project supply chain being insured under a single policy taken out by the project owner. The purpose of this article is to report the outcomes of a study aimed at developing understanding of project insurance practice and how it compares with the conventional system.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consisted of a questionnaire survey across four sectors of the construction industry.

Findings

Direct experience of project insurance is still very patchy. They also raise doubt whether project insurance offers significant benefits to the supply chain members with direct responsibility for designing or executing projects. The main advantages of project insurance over the traditional fragmented insurance products reported by respondents were: avoidance of litigation to determine which member of the project supply chain should ultimately be liable when loss or damage occurs; the ability to obtain cover for projects too large for the insurance capacity of some members of the supply chain; ability of the project owner to purchase customised cover.

Research limitations/implications

The disadvantages were: there is duplication from contractors, sub‐contractor and designers still having to purchase the traditional products for projects on which project insurance is not implemented; the levels of excess in the available project insurance products are too high; there is little reduction in the annual insurance premium bills of contractors, sub‐contractors and designers.

Practical implications

Universities and other educational institutions can contribute to developing wider awareness by including project insurance in not only their educational curricula but also their research priorities. The UK Government's decision to implement project insurance on some demonstration projects is a step in the right direction but needs to involve the research community who are better able to distil the experience for dissemination to the wider industry. The insurance industry needs to play a more proactive role by reassessing the levels of excesses in their project insurance policies and collaborating with the research community to develop more detailed knowledge of the technique.

Originality/value

This is the only reported empirical study into the use of project insurance in the UK construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Silas B. Yisa, Issaka Ndekugri and Brian Ambrose

The external, social, economic and political environments determine the opportunities for work and thereby potential profit. Clients’ needs and attitudes, like the…

7838

Abstract

The external, social, economic and political environments determine the opportunities for work and thereby potential profit. Clients’ needs and attitudes, like the external environment itself, are never static and therefore organizations need to adapt and respond to these fluctuations. Situated between the external and internal environment of an organization and operating at the boundary of the organization is the marketing function. There are many changes occurring in the UK construction industry: a levelling of the trade cycle; methods of placing contracts; increased emphasis on quality, experience and innovations; and increasing competition among firms; clients’ buying behaviour due to changes in the clients’ organization; and developments in technology. Evaluates the role of marketing in seeking to regulate the construction organizations’ relationships with changes within the industry and the external environment.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Issaka Ndekugri and Victoria Russell

The purpose of this article is to provide a critical analysis of court decisions on what amounts to a dispute that may be referred to adjudication under the Housing…

2654

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide a critical analysis of court decisions on what amounts to a dispute that may be referred to adjudication under the Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996.

Design/methodologyapproach

Legal research methods were followed. The first stage entailed a review of relevant literature. Reports of court decisions were then studied to identify cases involving litigation on what amounts to a dispute. A total of 26 cases, going back to 1965, were identified. Each case was then analysed to extract the applicable legal principles, particular attention being paid to clarity and consistency with not only other cases but also the policy underlying the relevant legislation.

Findings

Until only recently, first instance judges adopted the one or the other of two opposing approaches to the question, thereby causing considerable litigation. The Court of Appeal has twice approved a flexible approach based on the principle that a dispute arises only after a party has been given reasonable opportunity to consider the other party's claim and has rejected it expressly or by implication.

Originality/value

The novelty and global spread of adjudication lends the article considerable originality and value. Its main value is in the guidance it provides as to the principles that the court is likely to apply in answering the question whether a dispute capable of being referred to arbitration or adjudication exists. It is hoped that knowledge of these principles will reduce litigation on this issue.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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