Search results

1 – 10 of 483
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Israel Berger and John A. Cartmill

Although patients and lay people are often more knowledgeable about medical conditions than their predecessors, the dominant culture’s increased involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

Although patients and lay people are often more knowledgeable about medical conditions than their predecessors, the dominant culture’s increased involvement in understanding their health and making treatment decisions does not translate into consistently more informed patients. High health literacy is associated with both improved health outcomes and receiving better quality-of-care. Low health literacy disproportionately affects people from marginalized ethnic and language groups. Regardless of how a particular clinician feels about a patient, malapropisms and mis-attributions may cause patients to appear less intelligent or to have lower perceived health literacy, potentially affecting their healthcare experiences with other clinicians. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the evidence for “up-skilling” patients and uses principles from conversation analysis to demonstrate how malapropisms can be corrected sensitively. Clinician training in skilled communication using the conversation analytic role-play method is also addressed.

Findings

Malapropisms are best corrected through modelling rather than calling attention to the error directly, as this allows the patient to save face. Explanations using drawings and clearly written materials may also be useful.

Originality/value

Helping patients to improve their communication with clinicians may lead to improved health outcomes through improved quality-of-care.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Ram Herstein and Ron Berger

Cities all over the world rebrand themselves in order to refresh their image and attract/continue attracting tourists, industry or whichever group they hope to engage

4091

Abstract

Purpose

Cities all over the world rebrand themselves in order to refresh their image and attract/continue attracting tourists, industry or whichever group they hope to engage. Cities have tended to rebrand themselves based on varied social events and festivals such as fashion (Milan), food and beverages (Munich), folklore dancing (Rio de Janeiro), film (Cannes) and many more. The most powerful platform for rebranding a city is hosting the Olympic Games. Despite the fact that many city planners and decision-makers tend to perceive the Olympic Games as the highest yielding investment for reinforcing a city image, in the last three decades many host cities have lost millions of dollars, with this rare opportunity to leverage their city's image becoming one big fiasco. The aim of this paper is to present the key rules for making hosting the Olympic Games a very profitable business, in terms of reinforcing the city image.

Design/methodology/approach

Since some host cities are more established in economic terms and some are less, two different approaches (the “Barcelona model” and the “London model”) are discussed.

Findings

The Barcelona model shows how a city can leverage its image, based on the Olympic Games, to become more familiar to millions of potential tourists, and the London model shows how an entire country can also profit from the fact that its capital is hosting the Olympic Games.

Originality/value

The Barcelona model shows how a city can leverage its image, based on the Olympic Games, to become more familiar to millions of potential tourists, and the London model shows how an entire country can also profit from the fact that its capital is hosting the Olympic Games.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Ram Herstein and Ron Berger

City branding has become a very popular activity all over the globe. In this paper the authors aim to show the importance of sports events in city re‐branding strategies

9322

Abstract

Purpose

City branding has become a very popular activity all over the globe. In this paper the authors aim to show the importance of sports events in city re‐branding strategies, and how businesses take advantage of such opportunities to increase their incomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A new framework is presented that is based on four different alternatives for city re‐branding strategies based on sport events. These four re‐branding strategies are derived from two main dimensions: the locus of the sports event (local vs international) and the longevity of the sports event (one‐off vs continual).

Findings

Prospective hosts of mega or international sports events must ensure that people all over the world see their city as a leisure, tourism and consumption center and not just a sports arena. Conversely, when hosting medium or minor sports events, planners must aim for these sport events to increase residents' civic pride.

Practical implications

This conceptual paper demonstrates how city planners and decision makers can leverage their city image and its business sector's potential to earn from this event directly and indirectly, based on the aforesaid four re‐branding strategies: Mega sports events, International sports events, Medium sport events, and Minor sport events.

Originality/value

This article deals with four types of sports event strategies at the same time, whereas other investigations tend to deal with only a single type.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Ram Herstein, Ron Berger and Eugene D. Jaffe

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to present a new approach that will enable marketers in developing and emerging countries to promote their products, irrespective…

1246

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to present a new approach that will enable marketers in developing and emerging countries to promote their products, irrespective of their country of origin’s image. Many companies in emerging and developing countries, intent on exporting their products/services, struggle to overcome the negative “made-in” image barrier. Despite tremendous efforts by the governments of these countries to change the unfavorable image of products made there, their good quality products are still perceived as inferior compared to companies whose products are “made-in” in countries with a positive image, mainly developed countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed conceptual model hinges on two dimensions – global political status and human capital capabilities. Using this framework, four different types of country destination positioning emerge, each with its own country branding strategy.

Findings

Companies from emerging and developing countries can compete on an equal footing with Western companies by changing their country branding strategy. Companies from countries such as China and Costa Rica can promote themselves better by implementing region and continent branding strategies.

Practical implications

The proposed conceptual model enables marketers to cope even with the most negative “made-in” country stereotypes and improve their marketplace positions.

Originality/value

The literature review demonstrates that researchers have not dealt with these two dimensions. Consequently, the paper offers marketers a new perspective on the complex issue of country positioning and how to leverage their strengths to maximize their company’s profits.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Abstract

Details

Turbulence, Empowerment and Marginalisation in International Education Governance Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-675-2

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Sonya Lipczynska

29

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Majed R. Muhtaseb

The purpose of this paper is to offer case studies of hedge fund fraud, solutions that could mitigate hedge fund fraud risk, and a proposal for the industry to establish a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer case studies of hedge fund fraud, solutions that could mitigate hedge fund fraud risk, and a proposal for the industry to establish a hedge fund information depository (HFID) where participants/stakeholders could provide information on any hedge fund on regular basis.

Design/methodology/approach

Four major hedge fund fraud cases, Bayou Funds, Lipper Holdings, Manhattan Investment Fund and Maricopa Investment Corporation are used as examples of the complete absence of independent oversight and the application of HFID.

Findings

The paper finds that investors in the four funds lost more than $1.3 billion. In all four fraud cases, independent oversight and compliance function were conspicuously missing. In each fraud case there was at least one serious alert (warning) that took place at least 14 months prior to SEC first filing against the fund.

Research limitations/implications

Some hedge fund industry stakeholders may reluctantly join HFID due to concern over possibly disclosing information deemed crucial for their own competitive advantage.

Practical implications

Had third parties become aware of the alerts, they could have made a different investment or business decision. Most importantly, this depository would allow all hedge fund industry stakeholders (accountants, administrators, auditors, investors, marketers, prime brokers, custodians and regulators) to communicate with one another regularly.

Originality/value

The paper makes two proposals: the founding of a hedge fund information depository; and outsourcing of the compliance function for hedge funds where it is more cost effective.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Ron Berger, David Lamond, Yossi Gavish and Ram Herstein

The primary purpose of this paper is to fill the research gap regarding the evolution of managerial processes within (largely family) diamond industry firms, especially…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this paper is to fill the research gap regarding the evolution of managerial processes within (largely family) diamond industry firms, especially over the past seven decades.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were gathered from interviews with 100 managers in the diamond industry in Israel, together with data from Israeli Government, industry and academic sources.

Findings

Over the recent life cycle of the diamond industry, with its changing structures and dynamics, participant firms have evolved through seven stages of engagement, from one based on trust and personal connections to more impersonal, standardized connections that exist today.

Research limitations/implications

In seeking to tell the story of industry participants as a group, the differences in behaviours between the family firms and the non-family firms have not explored. This should be the work of future research, which, if aimed at teasing out the results of this study, may help shed additional light on the strategic processes that occur within family firms.

Practical implications

Although the firms examined in this study were from one industry (and an arguably narrow cultural base), their development over time was not dissimilar to the experience reported in other industries and cultures. This suggests that the components of the evolution of the strategic process that ensues within family firms may be generalizable throughout cultures. In the absence of kin relationships, the importance of trust in their dealings cannot be overstated.

Originality/value

The findings demonstrate how one group of participants in the global diamond industry has responded to the changing economic, social and political contexts of their operations, where trust and personal connections have been replaced by more impersonal, standardized dealings.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Louis Kriesberg and Ross A. Klein

The focus of this article is on non‐coercive means (i.e. reward and persuasion) for pursuing international conflicts. The article uses case studies of six Middle East…

Abstract

The focus of this article is on non‐coercive means (i.e. reward and persuasion) for pursuing international conflicts. The article uses case studies of six Middle East peace efforts to analyse the conditions which affect the utilisation and contribution of non‐coercive means. It looks at the factors that account for the limited use of non‐coercive means by adversaries in trying to induce the enemy to yield what was desired and at factors affecting the success of those efforts that are made.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2022

Ron Berger, Netanel Drori, Matti Rachamim and Ilan Alon

This paper aims to generalize emic studies of culture and thus provide indigenous view nuanced particularly for emerging markets.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to generalize emic studies of culture and thus provide indigenous view nuanced particularly for emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review four local business frameworks and deconstruct each into three different constructs. The authors systematically evaluate culture specific studies, particularities of jaan pehchaan (India), guanxi (China), sviazi (Russia) and wasta (Arab countries).

Findings

Building on social networking theory, the authors synthesize an emic model for four types of large emerging markets cultures – China, Russia, India and Arab countries – and divide them according to their affective, conative and cognitive elements.

Practical implications

By knowing the impact of the constructs and how to leverage it, managers can successfully penetrate and manage these complex markets.

Originality/value

Current models of culture, such as the ones proposed by Hofstede and GLOBE, are etic in their orientation, attempting to find variations in common dimensions across different cultures. Emic approaches to studying culture are more bottom-up and are idiosyncratic to the culture.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

1 – 10 of 483