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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Isobel Doole

To effectively train women to be successful in business, courses are required which recognise the differing strengths and approaches of women and build on these rather…

Abstract

To effectively train women to be successful in business, courses are required which recognise the differing strengths and approaches of women and build on these rather than forcing women into traditional, male‐orientated roles. Courses allowing for unisex training, with flexible timetabling to cater for family commitments and a higher concentration on building business skills rather than instilling knowledge, would greatly benefit women setting up in business. With the recession in the UK having broken down many traditional industrial and technical barriers there are tremendous opportunities for women to break into business; appropriate training needs to be devised to save losing many good ideas.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Anthony Grimes, Isobel Doole and Philip J. Kitchen

The purpose of this paper is to detail the rationale for, and development of, the Export Marketing Profiling System; a methodology for profiling and benchmarking the…

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2716

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to detail the rationale for, and development of, the Export Marketing Profiling System; a methodology for profiling and benchmarking the capabilities of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to compete internationally.

Design/methodology/approach

It is the outcome of four years of research, incorporating quantitative, qualitative and longitudinal studies into the international activities of SMEs.

Findings

The findings of this research are utilised in the development of a system that recognises key themes and distils them into the specific characteristics, competencies, capabilities and activities that contribute to successful performance in international markets.

Originality/value

The value of this system lies in the population of a large database of SMEs that have been profiled using in‐depth interviews. This enables users to profile and benchmark a company's export capabilities against other SMEs. It has been piloted successfully in the Yorkshire and The Humber region as part of the Regional International Trade Strategy and has also been disseminated to business support agencies in the UK and Europe, where it is currently used to identify support needs and evaluate the impact of specific interventions over time.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

John Hall, Michael Shaw and Isobel Doole

This paper investigates the influence of ethnologically based cultural factors on the motives and occasions for wine consumption both in Australia and overseas. As the…

Abstract

This paper investigates the influence of ethnologically based cultural factors on the motives and occasions for wine consumption both in Australia and overseas. As the international market for wine expands, global marketers have begun searching for new ways to define trans‐national segments. In particular, the success of Australian wines in the UK has provided a strong base for expansion into the competitive European market One key decision must involve what degree of differentiation the marketing program for each country will contain. Because many marketing theorists see ethnic or cultural background as one of the major underlying determinants of consumer behaviour this decision becomes quite critical. Others argue that consumption of wine is not culturally dependent but based on either a common set of motivations or is determined solely by the occasion in which wine will be consumed. To study this hypothesis a questionnaire was administered to approximately 500 respondents from a variety of Australian and European backgrounds. A single cross‐sectional design was employed. Respondents were primarily selected using a random sampling procedure with quotas boosted for some cultural groups by a convenience sampling process. The four chosen for analysis were Italian, Greek, German and Australian. It was found using an occasion‐based segmentation approach that there were significant differences between wine consumers of different cultural backgrounds. It is concluded that cultural factors do impact on the consumption process of wine and should be considered in any proposals for trans‐national segmentation strategies. However it is also shown that there are some motivational factors that are not culturally dependent. These factors are prime reasons for general wine consumption behaviour and could be used if an undifferentiated global! approach to wine segmentation is the most efficient for the marketer.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Isobel Doole, Tony Grimes and Sean Demack

To take a more holistic and integrated view than in existing studies of export capability among small and medium‐sized enterprises, by exploring the key components of…

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2053

Abstract

Purpose

To take a more holistic and integrated view than in existing studies of export capability among small and medium‐sized enterprises, by exploring the key components of marketing management, and the blend of processes, practices and activities most closely associated with high levels of overall export performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The principal research instrument is the export marketing profiling system developed by the authors over a five‐year period, which provided the framework for data collection and analysis. Findings are derived from 250 semi‐structured interviews conducted in SMEs in the Yorkshire and Humber region of the UK.

Findings

The study identified 17 key practices, processes and activities that, taken together, are closely associated with export performance. They relate primarily to export marketing strategy, and suggest that a blend of capabilities in the areas of knowledge management (including market research and marketing intelligence), relationship‐building, product strategy and pricing are most closely associated with success.

Practical implications

The study has particular implications for business‐support providers. The findings could be used to assess and evaluate export capability in a wider sense. The conceptual framework could serve as a diagnostic tool for the identification of the areas of operation in which support, intervention and investment might have the greatest impact on overall export capability. Further research in these areas would be of particular importance in the drive to understand the relationship between export capability and performance.

Originality/value

This study's holistic approach to identifying the blend of capabilities most closely associated with high levels of export performance could inform national and local government policy in respect of the role of support agencies in improving the export performance of SMEs, in the UK or elsewhere. It offers a template for further research into key practices, processes and activities.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Keith Crosier

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562

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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