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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Wiliam H. Murphy, Ismail Gölgeci and David A. Johnston

This paper aims to explain the effects of national and organizational cultures of boundary spanners on their choices of using three archetype power-based behaviors …

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the effects of national and organizational cultures of boundary spanners on their choices of using three archetype power-based behaviors – dominance, egalitarian and submissive – with supply chain partners. Improved outcomes for global supply chain (GSC) partners are anticipated due to the ways that cultural intelligence affects these culturally guided decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on multiple streams of literature and focusing on boundary spanners in GSCs, the authors build a conceptual framework that highlights cultural antecedents of predispositions toward power-based behaviors and explains the moderating role of cultural intelligence of boundary spanners on behaviors performed.

Findings

The authors propose that boundary spanners’ national and organizational cultural values influence predispositions toward applying and accepting power-based behaviors. They also discuss how cultural intelligence moderates the relationship between culturally determined predispositions and power-based behaviors applied by partners. The cultural intelligence of boundary spanners is argued to have a pivotal role in making power-based decisions, resulting in healthier cross-cultural buyer–supplier relationships.

Originality/value

This paper is the first paper to advance an understanding of the cultural antecedents of boundary spanners’ power-based behaviors that are exercised and interpreted by partners in GSCs. Furthermore, the potential role of cultural intelligence in inter-organizational power dynamics and power-based partner behaviors in supply chains has not previously been discussed.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Ricardo Malagueño, Ismail Gölgeci and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of perceived relational justice on the relationship between key customer categorization and performance of small food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of perceived relational justice on the relationship between key customer categorization and performance of small food and drink producers in supermarket supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data are derived from a sample of (small-scale) suppliers of local and regional food to a large British supermarket. Partial least squares regression analysis was used to test a conceptual framework, which positions relational justice as a mediator in the relationship between key customer categorization and supplier performance, moderated by the length of the relationship.

Findings

The findings reveal that small suppliers who perceive their treatment by their key customers as fair tend to achieve higher business performance, which supports the hypothesized mediating role of relational justice on supplier performance. However, this research found no evidence to support the hypothesis that this role is moderated by the length of the relationship between the supplier and buyer.

Originality/value

This paper makes a novel empirical contribution, focusing on performance outcomes for small-scale suppliers in a highly competitive environment (fast-moving consumer goods) with customers (supermarkets) who have significant market power. Accordingly, the paper shows that the way supermarket buyers treat their suppliers matters more for the performance of their suppliers than the very fact that they are key customers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2019

Ismail Golgeci, Abderaouf Bouguerra and Yasin Rofcanin

The human element, especially its multilevel manifestation, has been overlooked in research investigating the antecedents of firm supply chain agility (FSCA). The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

The human element, especially its multilevel manifestation, has been overlooked in research investigating the antecedents of firm supply chain agility (FSCA). The purpose of this paper is to explore how a firm’s entrepreneurial orientation and market orientation affect FSCA through individual capabilities and actions within the boundary conditions of individual identification with the firm and organizational work climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a multilevel approach and drawing on a cross-disciplinary reading of the literature, the authors analyze drivers and enablers of FSCA and advance a framework explaining the emergence of FSCA within the boundary conditions of transformational leadership, individual identification and organizational work climate.

Findings

The authors advance that relevant individual capabilities and intraorganizational actions underlie FSCA in the firms’ pursuit of realizing their strategic orientations as increased agile capacities. The effectiveness of individual capabilities and actions for the emergence of FSCA is contingent upon the extent to which managers identify themselves with their firm, transformational leadership and the nature of organizational work climate.

Originality/value

The original contribution of the paper is to explain the interplay between the multilayered attitudinal, behavioral and structural enablers of FSCA and incorporate the human element into the research on the antecedents of FSCA.

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Ismail Gölgeci, Ahmad Arslan, Desislava Dikova and David M. Gligor

The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize the interplay between resilience and agility in explicating the concept of resilient agility and discuss institutional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize the interplay between resilience and agility in explicating the concept of resilient agility and discuss institutional and organizational antecedents of resilient agility in volatile economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a conceptual framework that offers an original account of underlying means of ambidextrous capabilities for organizational change and behaviors in volatile economies and how firms stay both resilient and agile in such contexts.

Findings

The authors suggest that resilient agility, an ambidextrous capability of sensing and acting on environmental changes nimbly while withstanding unfavorable disruptions, can explain entrepreneurial firms’ survival and prosperity. The authors then address institutional (instability and estrangement) and organizational (entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and bricolage) antecedents of resilient agility in volatile economies.

Originality/value

The authors highlight that unfavorable conditions in volatile economies might have bright sides for firms that can leverage them as entrepreneurial opportunities and propose that firms can achieve increased resilient agility when high levels of institutional instability and estrangement are matched with high levels of EO and bricolage.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Imran Ali and Ismail Gölgeci

Despite several contributions to greenhouse gas emission and carbon footprint reduction, the literature lacks empirical insights into the business impact of climate risks…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite several contributions to greenhouse gas emission and carbon footprint reduction, the literature lacks empirical insights into the business impact of climate risks, when they materialize, and techniques to manage them. This study aims to devise a model delving into critical climate risks and the role of consortia and social capital to mitigate these risks.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was used, including qualitative and quantitative data from small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in an Australian agrifood supply chain (AFSC).

Findings

The qualitative analysis uncovers four critical climate risks and a repertoire of relational, structural, and cognitive social capital accrued by SMEs of AFSC through consortia. The quantitative analysis corroborates that the SMEs that accumulate higher social capital through active engagement within consortia are able to respond more effectively to climate risks than to others. The authors, therefore, find that climate risk mitigation in SMEs is the function of both association (consortia) membership and the accrual of higher social capital through active involvement and collaboration within networks.

Originality/value

This is the first study in using a moderated-moderation model that simultaneously investigates the business impact of climate risks and how the moderating impact of consortia (a primary moderator) is further moderated by social capital (a secondary moderator) in explaining SMEs performance. The paper addresses the lack of adequate empirical research, particularly mixed-methods, in supply chain risk management literature.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Imran Ali and Ismail Gölgeci

The purpose of this paper is to algorithmically and objectively investigate the previous literature on supply chain resilience (SCR) and advance theory by synthesizing new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to algorithmically and objectively investigate the previous literature on supply chain resilience (SCR) and advance theory by synthesizing new research domains.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-staged analysis approach, integrating systematic literature review (SLR) with VOSviewer co-occurrence analysis, was applied to the articles published between 2003 and 2018.

Findings

The authors find exponential growth in the literature on SCR over the last decade; however, there is still a gap for empirical research on numerous drivers, barriers, theories, moderators, mediators and research methods intertwined in building SCR.

Research limitations/implications

The review identifies major clusters in which SCR research is conducted and devises a future research agenda based on the findings of co-occurrence analysis.

Practical implications

The findings provide managers with a broad spectrum of factors that are indispensable to build resilience and inform business policy.

Originality/value

While some SLRs exist in the current literature of SCR, the authors undertake a unique analytical perspective, resulting in an idiosyncratic set of research domains for further investigation in the area.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Fawzi Tigharsi, Abderaouf Bouguerra, Ismail Golgeci and Yasin Rofcanin

The purpose of this study is to explore employees’ knowledge- and learning-related experiences in moving between local firms and multinational enterprises (MNEs) and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore employees’ knowledge- and learning-related experiences in moving between local firms and multinational enterprises (MNEs) and to examine the nature of paradoxes of labor mobility that local talents face in their career in the North African country of Algeria. In doing so, this paper explored the multifaceted experiences of employees who left local firms and joined MNEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a qualitative study, in-depth interviews with 12 employees from various industries, and apply an interpretive phenomenological approach to explain labor mobility between local firms and MNEs in the North African country of Algeria. The authors specifically focus on personal experiences of employees who worked in both local firms and MNEs.

Findings

The findings report a paradoxical situation and suggest that despite talented individuals grow their capabilities in MNEs through reward and personal growth incentives, the grass is not always greener, and they face the paradox of nurturing their capabilities (wings) or empowering their roots by returning local firms to seek stability, security and flexibility.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the research at the intersection of human resource management, knowledge management and the paradox of management in emerging markets. Its value stems from empirically explicating the paradox of roots and wings as a complementary, learning type of paradox that individuals at local firms and MNEs in Algeria experience.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

David Gligor, Siddik Bozkurt, Ismail Gölgeci and Michael J. Maloni

Despite the recent wealth of supply chain agility literature, scholars have yet to thoroughly examine its impacts on the customer experience. To address this gap, we…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the recent wealth of supply chain agility literature, scholars have yet to thoroughly examine its impacts on the customer experience. To address this gap, we assess the effects of supply chain agility on customer value and customer satisfaction, including the moderating role of customer loyalty, from the perspectives of both business customers (B2B) and end-customers (B2C).

Design/methodology/approach

We used multivariate regression analysis to evaluate direct, indirect and conditional effects across survey responses from 148 senior-level supply chain managers (buyers) (Study 1) and 170 end-customers (i.e. consumers) (Study 2).

Findings

The results reveal that supply chain agility retains a direct link to both B2B and B2C’ value and satisfaction. However, a higher level of customer loyalty reduces the strength of these relationships, signifying that agility is less important with established customers. In this respect, agility is important to attract new customers, but more agility is not always beneficial once the customer relationship is established.

Originality/value

The current study is among the first to examine end-customer response to supply chain agility. The findings complement existing literature by providing novel insights into the impact of supply chain agility on both business customers (B2B) and end-customers (B2C).

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2020

Ahmad Arslan, Ismail Golgeci, Lauri Haapanen, Shlomo Tarba, Cary Cooper and William Y. Degbey

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of legitimacy in internationalization to Africa of a Finnish professional service microfirm, which uses cause-related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of legitimacy in internationalization to Africa of a Finnish professional service microfirm, which uses cause-related marketing (CRM) as the business model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper consists of a single case study of a microfirm (two employees) originating from Finland, which has successfully internationalized to many African countries. Due to the uniqueness of the context, the authors use semi-structured interviews to collect founders’ insights to the issue being addressed. Moreover, along with interviews, secondary sources related to football talent scouting in Africa are also utilized in the paper.

Findings

The authors found that the case company was established with the aim of helping and uplifting poor African footballers, so the business model is CRM. It has scouted many of them for professional football clubs in Europe. The authors further found that sociopolitical legitimacy plays a major role in dealing with African footballers and local stakeholders, while cognitive legitimacy helped the case firm gain the trust of European football clubs.

Originality/value

Internationalization of microfirms operating in the service sector is a rather under-researched area compared to the internationalization of SMEs and large MNEs. The paper is one of the first to study internationalization of a professional service microfirm involved in scouting football talent in Africa and matchmaking them with European football clubs. It contributes to extant CRM and internationalization literature by being one of the first to analyze a firm whose business model revolves around CRM and discussing specific roles of different kinds of legitimacies needed for internationalization to Africa in this specific service sector.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Ismail Golgeci and David M. Gligor

This paper aims to identify key marketing and supply chain management-related (supply chain management – SCM) capabilities and explore the nature of the linkages between…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify key marketing and supply chain management-related (supply chain management – SCM) capabilities and explore the nature of the linkages between these specific capabilities as shaped by the integrative mechanisms adopted by firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the findings from dyadic interviews with 26 marketing and SCM executives from business-to-business firms, the authors develop an empirically grounded conceptual framework.

Findings

The authors identify innovativeness and market learning capability as key marketing capabilities and supply chain agility and relational capability as key SCM capabilities. The authors find that relationships between these strategic marketing and SCM capabilities follow a specific pattern. The authors also find that the application of unique integrative mechanisms can cultivate the potential tandem between marketing and SCM capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The study informs theory with regard to two key areas: relationships among key marketing and SCM capabilities and integrative mechanisms that shape the underlying mechanisms of capability relationships.

Practical implications

Application of organizational dynamics to key marketing and SCM provides a more nuanced understanding of the linkages among such capabilities. A better understanding and application of integrative mechanisms may help managers to develop better tools and means to bundle their key marketing and SCM capabilities effectively.

Originality/value

The qualitative and exploratory nature of the paper will be of significant interest to managers who would like to achieve greater synergy between marketing and SCM capabilities.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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