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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2022

Takwa Zitouni and Khoutem Ben Jedidia

Islamic microfinance is a substantial tool for poverty alleviation and economic empowerment. The paper aims at accessing the potential of Islamic microfinance for the…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic microfinance is a substantial tool for poverty alleviation and economic empowerment. The paper aims at accessing the potential of Islamic microfinance for the purpose of achieving the economic empowerment in Tunisia.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey method is used. The method is intended for some of the beneficiaries of Zitouna Tamkeen (ZT), the only Islamic microfinance institution in Tunisia. Responses are analyzed using the statistical package for the social sciences program.

Findings

The authors infer that though the Islamic and conventional microfinance have similar objectives, the methods are different. What is more, the economic empowerment requires not only financial inclusion and entrepreneurship, but also skill development. The results of the survey reveal that ZT has contributed to certain economic empowerment of most of ZT's beneficiaries. In addition, the authors bring to the fore that providing supportive infrastructure and investment is a prominent component of the economic empowerment process.

Research limitations/implications

In the paper, the sample is limited.

Practical implications

The authors have highlighted that some structural barriers to entrepreneurship – such as legal, operational and marketing challenges – need to be addressed in a practical way.

Originality/value

This paper establishes the relationship between the Islamic microfinance and economic empowerment. The current paper is the first investigation in this field in Tunisia.

Details

Journal of Business and Socio-economic Development, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2635-1374

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Ssemambo Hussein Kakembo, Muhamad Abduh and Pg Md Hasnol Alwee Pg Hj Md Salleh

Despite the fact that small and medium enterprises (SMEs) play a crucial role in strengthening the financial sector within developing and emerging economies through…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the fact that small and medium enterprises (SMEs) play a crucial role in strengthening the financial sector within developing and emerging economies through providing employment opportunities to the rural and urban population, capacity building in the form of skills training and economic empowerment, they still face a plethora of challenges that continue to threaten their existence, performance and growth. Access to operational and administrative funds needed to execute their activities effectively is a significant challenge and detrimental to the growth of SMEs in Uganda. Conversely, Islamic microfinance has been noted as a panacea to the challenges of financial inaccessibility among SMEs, especially in developing countries. The purpose of this paper is therefore to investigate how the adoption of Islamic microfinance can play a fundamental role in enhancing the sustainability of microfinance institutions (MFIs) while meeting the financing challenges of SMEs in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a review of existing literature was carried out to critically examine relevant information (literature sources) and empirical studies on SMEs, their performance and challenges. The study being conceptual tries to understand how Islamic microfinance could be adopted as an alternative scheme of financing to bridge the gap and mitigate the financial challenges facing SMEs.

Findings

The study finds that the existing MFIs have failed to achieve their objectives of providing financial services to the poor and SMEs while remaining sustainable. This has left the majority of SMEs within Uganda's informal sector financially handicapped, thus leading to their failure in meeting their expectations and eventually collapsing even before celebrating their third or fourth birthdays. However, the enactment into law of the Financial Institutions Amendment Act 2016 that paved the way for the introduction of Islamic finance in Uganda, and the Tier 4 Microfinance Institutions and Money Lenders' Act, 2016 that incorporated the aspects of Islamic microfinance within the existing microfinance framework as seen and is perceived as a key factor in addressing the financial challenges faced by MFIs and the SMEs if fully adopted.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conceptual with no empirical investigation and discussion of key theories. On the contrary, it will be imperative and useful when carrying out more extensive hypothetical studies by future researchers, specifically in the area of Islamic microfinance that is relatively new in Uganda.

Practical implications

Practically, this paper will serve as a guide to policymakers and practitioners in the field of microfinance by adding a flair that could enable in bridging the challenges associated with inadequate financing of SMEs in Uganda.

Social implications

Socially, the social aspects of charity (Zakah and Sadaqah) will help to improve the livelihood of the poorest of the poor who cannot engage in active business through meeting their basic needs of life without begging thereby preventing them from being social outcasts.

Originality/value

The study establishes Islamic microfinance (IMF) as a promising and unexplored viable option potentially needed in intensifying the financing needs of SMEs in Uganda. The paper provides an entirely new dimension in nature and way microfinance products should be structured with a view of ensuring that there is sustainable provision of financial services to SMEs. The paper adds real value to the existing conventional microfinance products and services in Uganda, given the ethical and moral attributes of Islamic microfinancing practices that are assumed to efficiently and effectively motivate SME owners and other small entrepreneurs to thrive.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2018

Hartomi Maulana, Dzuljastri Abdul Razak and Adewale Abideen Adeyemi

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the factors that affect Muslim customers’ participation in using Baitul Maal wat Tamwil (BMT). The decomposed theory of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the factors that affect Muslim customers’ participation in using Baitul Maal wat Tamwil (BMT). The decomposed theory of planned behaviour (DTPB) was used as the research framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses primary data collected by self-administered questionnaires involving a sample of 405 respondents from selected BMTs in five different regencies in East Java. Structural equation modelling was used in the analysis.

Findings

This study revealed that among the three main beliefs, only perceived behavioural control towards BMT was found to have positive and significant impact on clients’ participation towards BMT. With regards to antecedents’ influence on their main beliefs, only perceived compatibility, perceived complexity and uncertainty and facilitating condition were not significant.

Research limitations/implications

As the data collected are existing clients of BMT, behavioural intention is excluded from the study, and as a result, the study may lack comprehensive results. Therefore, future study will be very useful if it includes behavioural intention as the variables.

Practical implications

The finding of the present study could help BMT to better manage by focussing on relative advantage and behavioural control to build client relationships.

Originality/value

The paper may be first study to apply DTPB to client behaviours in the area of Islamic microfinance in Indonesia.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Kausar Abbas and Nasim Shirazi

This study aims to know the present structure and move of the Islamic banks of Pakistan as well as current issues and challenges for Islamic microfinance. However, this is…

1996

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to know the present structure and move of the Islamic banks of Pakistan as well as current issues and challenges for Islamic microfinance. However, this is based on perceptions of the Islamic bankers, regulators and micro-entrepreneurs and petty traders, as they are the key players in the credit market.

Design/methodology/approach

The study gathered relevant information through conducting field survey. Two questionnaires were designed for the survey. One questionnaire was administered to survey 270 micro-entrepreneurs and petty traders in three major cities of Pakistan. Another survey deals with the perceptions of Islamic bankers. In total, 100 people from middle and top management were surveyed from five full-fledged Islamic banks of Pakistan. The SPSS software, version 16, was used for questionnaire reliability and descriptive analysis to analyse the data.

Findings

In general, the study found the strong opinions of the respondents speak in favour of Islamic microfinance under a system of profit and loss sharing. Conversely, the majority of the clients also feel that Islamic banks do not encourage lower-income micro-entrepreneurs. In addition, the study found that Islamic microfinance is constrained by lack of knowledge, experience and professionalism of the supporting staff; however, Islamic bankers have shown great consensus that Islamic banks should offer Islamic microfinance products and instruments to respond to the needs of the poor for poverty alleviation.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation of the study is the meagre interest of micro-entrepreneurs and petty traders to participate in the survey. The second limitation of this work concerns the extremely busy schedule of top management and administrative impediment to approach and fix an appointment. Despite these limitations, the findings of this study provide insights to Islamic banks in diversifying their products by offering Islamic microfinance to the low-income entrepreneurs but with proper guidelines and policies.

Practical implications

There is a need to educate the community towards the merits of Islamic banking system by developing a good information system using good visuals and professionally presented seminars, banners and arranging regular sessions with the business community. The growth and development of Islamic banking in the country largely depend on its customers’ enhanced knowledge and awareness about its products and services.

Social implications

It is the responsibility of the community as well as of government to change the mindset of the poor that banks are meant to serve the interest of everybody, regardless of social, economic and political status.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study contributes to the existing body of knowledge in the area of Islamic microfinance by examining the perceptions of Islamic bankers and micro-entrepreneurs. This can help Islamic banks of Pakistan to design and formulate new administrative as well as operational procedures to serve the interest of the poor with commitment towards Islamic values.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Abul Hassan and Shamim Saleem

The main purpose of this study is two-fold: first, it aims to confirm or disapprove a positive relationship between Islamic microfinance and the socio-economic welfare of…

1935

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is two-fold: first, it aims to confirm or disapprove a positive relationship between Islamic microfinance and the socio-economic welfare of women and, second, it aims to explore the perspective in which Islamic microfinance packages function in Bangladesh and the system of their performance can be enhanced.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on structured questionnaires’ survey, this study addressed two research questions: What should be anticipated from the programmes of Islamic microfinance on the well-being of beneficiaries and under what circumstances would such programmes be more useful?

Findings

The main result of this study shows that growth in women’s revenue and resources played an important role in improving women’s financial freedom and sense of self-possession. A significant policy endorsement in this study is that it is essential to redirect Islamic microfinance to spread in the developmental activities which will drive to contribute towards the well-being of the recipients in the long run.

Originality/value

Examination of the Rural Development Scheme of Islami Bank Bangladesh is undertaken, aiming to critically review their Islamic microfinance programme in the matter of fighting poverty in Bangladesh and to suggest to diversify the Islamic microfinance scheme to spread in the developmental activities which will drive to contribute towards the well-being of the recipients in the long run.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2019

Luqyan Tamanni and Mohd Hairul Azrin Haji Besar

The purpose of this paper is to shed some lights on the process of mission drifting or abandoning poverty objective by Islamic microfinance institutions (IMFs). The paper…

3072

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed some lights on the process of mission drifting or abandoning poverty objective by Islamic microfinance institutions (IMFs). The paper investigates whether the extensive use of banking logic changes IMFs, from focusing on both development and financial objectives to only considering sustainability as their primary mission.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts mixed methods by analyzing 7,200 microfinance data from Microfinance Exchange Market and reviewing annual reports and websites of 25 IMFs to examine their vision and mission statements and other related information.

Findings

The finding shows Islamic microfinance has not changed, despite increasing adoption of financial or banking performance measures. However, size and age of the institutions may affect the outcome in the future. The authors find that smaller microfinance institutions maintain genuine objective to serve the poor, as the grow larger they would be more inclined toward sustainability objectives.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited on the sample size as data on Islamic microfinance globally is limited. However, the paper looked at the global data rather than local data to compensate for this limitation. Future study would be further taking the study through qualitative methods to support the study.

Originality/value

This paper aims to shed some lights on the process of mission drifting or abandoning poverty objective by IMFIs. The paper investigates how has the extensive use of financing logic has changed IMFIs from focusing on both development and financial objectives to only considering sustainability as their primary mission. Arun and Hulme (2009) argued that the interaction of multiple logic within microfinance institutions, i.e. financial vs social, could pose some serious management dilemmas within microfinance institutions. Further, commercialization puts pressure on the field staffs to achieve financial targets and often neglect their poverty outreach mission to the poor. The well-known crisis in Andhra Pradesh, India where clients of microfinance institutions committed suicide after being shamed by field officers who tried to collect payments of loans (Mader, 2013; Taylor, 2011), provides a powerful case of the impact of financialization to microfinance clients.

Details

Asian Journal of Accounting Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2443-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Abul Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to initiate a direct discourse towards an Islamic microfinance focus agenda for the economic enlistment of the poor minority community and to…

2724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to initiate a direct discourse towards an Islamic microfinance focus agenda for the economic enlistment of the poor minority community and to allow poorer households in the financial inclusion. The issue of the Indian conventional microfinance institutions in failing to attract the poorest of the poor amongst Muslims is important for the purpose of this paper. This study explores a Shari’ah-compliant microfinance system which will create a level of playing-field with respect to the financial inclusion of the poor.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a theoretical discussion on Islamic microfinancial services for financial inclusion of the poor. Therefore, there is little to say about “methodology” other than the conventional microfinance model is reviewed, and an alternative model of Islamic microfinancial service has been suggested to allow poorer households in the financial inclusion.

Findings

The paper finds that there are some opportunities capable of improving the economic condition of the poor Muslim communities through some innovative approaches. To illustrate this finding, the paper emphasises on designing and delivering Islamic microfinancial products suitable for the poor based on the principle of Islamic solidarity. It argues that this service will help the poor and turn their savings into sums large enough to satisfy a wide range of personal, social and asset-building needs as well as needs relating to small businesses and consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s findings are limited to the matter of financial inclusion of the poor through Islamic microfinancial services in India.

Originality/value

Combining the Islamic social principle of solidarity for the less fortunate with the power of microfinance to provide financial access to the poor has the potential to reach out to millions more people. The ideas presented in this paper are designed to direct discourse towards an Islamic microfinance focus agenda for the economic enlistment of the poor Muslims in India.

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Abu Umar Faruq Ahmad and A.B. Rafique Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the existing body of work in the area of Islamic microfinance by examining the co‐operative nature of Islamic financial…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the existing body of work in the area of Islamic microfinance by examining the co‐operative nature of Islamic financial services providers (IFSPs) in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The method employed in this study is a mixture of one of the authors' post‐graduate research and their personal experience, curiosity and association with this industry.

Findings

Islamic financial cooperatives, relevant government authorities and Islamic micro‐lenders in Australia should cautiously examine the following opportunities for the development of Islamic microfinance in Australia: merging of Islamic cooperatives with each other for their future growth and development through attracting more capital; integration of microfinancing Islamic investment and retail banking facilities to provide the twin engines of fulfilling communities' religious needs and Australia's economic development; and introducing more creative Islamic microfinance techniques to suit the financial needs of individuals and groups to facilitate their contribution in the country's economic development.

Practical implications

The paper offers: an introduction to the emergence and development of Islamic microfinance in Australia; studies the current realities of the Islamic financial system of Australia from the perspective of Islamic microfinance contracting perspectives; explains the key role of IFSPs in Australia in fulfilling the microfinance needs of Muslim community; and examines the Islamic microfinance techniques they use.

Originality/value

Examination of the issues of the study is undertaken aiming at introducing Islamic microfinance with relevant parties including government authorities and Islamic micro‐lenders in Australia to find it as a viable alternative system of financing for Muslims in Australia.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Zainab Belal Lawhaishy and Anwar Hasan Abdullah Othman

This study aims to propose and verify the suitability and applicability of Islamic equity-based microfinance models for financing micro, small and medium enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose and verify the suitability and applicability of Islamic equity-based microfinance models for financing micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in the State of Libya. The proposed models combine the unique features of social solidarity, cooperation “Ta’awan,” meeting religious requirements and providing financing more fairly and equitably.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is applied in this study through semi-structured interviews with several Libyan experts, including Islamic bankers, Shariah scholars, MSMEs experts, Islamic microfinance experts and academicians. The data collected from 2019 to 2021 and thematic analysis by computer-based software NVivo is used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results indicate that the proposed Islamic equity-based microfinance models are suitable and applicable in Libya. This study also reveals that the proposed models have numerous potential benefits not only in meeting the financial needs of MSMEs but also in meeting the government objectives in economic divarication and socioeconomic development.

Research limitations/implications

First, the study proposes the applicability and suitability of Islamic equity-based models in financing MSMEs only, while large firms are excluded from the study. Second, the study only proposes and tests the applicability of Islamic equity-modes of financing contracts, namely, Musharakah and Mudarabah, while Islamic debt-based financing models are not included. Finally, as there is no practical evidence of using those models for financing MSMEs in Libya, this study lacks empirical evaluations of equity models’ real benefits on income, employment generation, living standards improvement and business growth and sustainability.

Practical implications

Given the importance of the MSMEs sector for the State of Libya’s economic growth, it is expected that the findings of this study can be of assistance in formulating guidelines and implementing Islamic equity-based microfinance programs. Besides, it can be a valuable source of information for policymakers for improving the functions of the current microfinance programs in the country. Additionally, as studies concerning Islamic alternative models for financing MSMEs are scarce, the current study can also be a reference point for researchers, academicians, practitioners and other stakeholders.

Social implications

Providing capital support for the underfunded economy segment, attracting small savings, increasing investments and developing entrepreneurial skills could lead to improved economic productivity and growth.

Originality/value

The present study proposes the structure of Islamic equity-based microfinance models for MSMEs in Libya and verifies the suitability of those proposed models among Libyan experts. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study has been conducted on uncovering and exploring the potentials of Islamic equity-based microfinance models for financing MSMEs in Libya.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2022

Salih Ülev, Fatih Savaşan and Mücahit Özdemir

This paper aims to investigate the effect of Islamic microfinance on poor households through the case of the IKSAR Qard al-Hasan Program in Turkey. To achieve this aim, it…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of Islamic microfinance on poor households through the case of the IKSAR Qard al-Hasan Program in Turkey. To achieve this aim, it examined the changes in the socio-economic status of beneficiaries before and after the program.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the convergent parallel mixed method design. It conducted two surveys to micro-entrepreneurs: the first is when they received the loan and the second is when they finished their installments. In addition to the longitudinal data obtained from these two surveys, qualitative data were collected by participant observation and interview technique with visiting these people periodically throughout the interest-free loan (qard al-hasan).

Findings

According to the results obtained from the analysis of the pre- and post-surveys, a statistically significant increase of 35% was experienced in the monthly household income after receiving the qard al-hasan loan compared to before. Similarly, a statistically significant increase was found in the monthly expenditures of 23 out of 30 households after receiving the qard al-hasan.

Originality/value

There are two originalities of this study. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is the first research that examines the only Islamic microfinance program in Turkey. Second, it uses longitudinal data while examining the impact of Islamic microfinance on the welfare of the poor. In the relevant literature, no study has been identified that uses longitudinal data in Islamic microfinance. Similarly, a limited number of longitudinal studies examine the impact of conventional microfinance institutions on the poor.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

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