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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jonathan A.J. Wilson, Russell W. Belk, Gary J. Bamossy, Özlem Sandikci, Hermawan Kartajaya, Rana Sobh, Jonathan Liu and Linda Scott

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently branded phenomenon of Islamic marketing – in the interests of stimulating further erudition.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an “eagle eye” method to investigate this phenomenon: Where attempts were made to frame general principles and observations; alongside a swooping view of key anecdotal observations – in order to ground and enrich the study. The authors participated in an iterative process when analysing longitudinal and contemporary phenomenological data, in order to arrive at a consensus. This was grounded in: triangulating individual and collective researcher findings; critiquing relevant published material; and reflecting upon known reviewed manuscripts submitted to marketing publications – both successful and unsuccessful.

Findings

The authors assert that a key milestone in the study and practice of marketing, branding, consumer behaviour and consumption in connection with Islam and Muslims is the emergence of research wherein the terms “Islamic marketing” and “Islamic branding” have evolved – of which JIMA is also a by‐product. Some have construed Islam marketing/branding as merely a niche area. Given the size of Muslim populations globally and the critical importance of understanding Islam in the context of business and practices with local, regional and international ramifications, scholarship on Islamic marketing has become essential. Western commerce and scholarship has been conducted to a limited extent, and some evidence exists that research is occurring globally. The authors believe it is vital for “Islamic marketing” scholarship to move beyond simply raising the flag of “Brand Islam” and the consideration of Muslim geographies to a point where Islam – as a way of life, a system of beliefs and practices, and religious and social imperatives – is amply explored.

Research limitations/implications

An “eagle eye” view has been taken, which balances big picture and grassroots conceptual findings. The topic is complex – and so while diverse expert opinions are cited, coverage of many issues is necessarily brief, due to space constraints.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners alike should find the thoughts contained in the paper of significant interest. Ultimately, scholarship of Islam's influences on marketing theory and practice should lead to results which have pragmatic implications, just as research on Islamic banking and finance has.

Originality/value

The paper appears to be the first to bring together such a diverse set of expert opinions within one body of work, and one that provides a forum for experts to reflect and comment on peers' views, through iteration. Also the term Crescent marketing is introduced to highlight how critical cultural factors are, which shape perceptions and Islamic practises.

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Jonathan Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to document a reflective commentary on observations concerning the phenomenon of researching and practicing Islamic marketing, in the absence…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document a reflective commentary on observations concerning the phenomenon of researching and practicing Islamic marketing, in the absence of dedicated formal courses and instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory phenomenological critical reflection; based upon academic and practitioner anecdotal evidence and experiences.

Findings

Whilst there is a growing body of literature and scholarship specific to the field, mirrored by an increase in consumption and commercial ventures, comparably there appear to be a paucity of dedicated courses tackling the same area in equivalent depth. Intuitively and inductively, it is argued that there is both a need and demand for Islamic marketing courses, which at the very least, present commercial market opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

Without remedying this gap, practitioners and academics are impoverished – through a lack of dedicated platforms for disseminating findings, knowledge sharing and problem solving. Furthermore, without ratification through formal instruction and courses, there is a risk that the subject may remain on the fringes. This is in spite of growing empirical evidence indicating that the demand is great: within mainstream marketing as a subject, not to mention the demand from audiences – ranging from practitioners and consumers, right through to curious and inspired students.

Originality/value

This paper aims to raise the importance of teaching and learning up the agenda – hopefully encouraging more academic institutions and training providers to develop and deliver dedicated courses. Furthermore, summary guidance is offered on potential key areas of focus.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Laurent Tournois and Isabelle Aoun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the foundations of an Islamic market oriented cultural approach regarding its possible implementation by non‐Muslim firms.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the foundations of an Islamic market oriented cultural approach regarding its possible implementation by non‐Muslim firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a critical review of existing literature on Islamic marketing and branding. Related market oriented strategies (from a cultural perspective) are discussed regarding their possible implementation by non‐Muslim firms, particularly in the context of Lebanon.

Findings

It is found that the theoretical foundations and the results of existing research hold back the understanding and implementation by Western firms and marketers of Islamic marketing principles.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents only conceptual arguments; it does not include empirical examination at this stage. A quadrad is finally proposed in order to validate these arguments.

Practical implications

Western businesses are faced with many dilemmas when it comes to taking decisions based, in particular, on the understanding and the implementation of marketing with an Islamic root. The major challenge lies in responding successfully to the needs and requirements of Muslim customers through complying with Islamic principles and practices without alienating non‐Muslim customers.

Originality/value

Most of the existing research on Islamic marketing concerns Muslim firms, but few Western firms, when targeting both Muslim and non‐Muslim populations. The paper stresses the importance of expanding the frontiers of recent work on Islamically‐rooted market oriented strategies with reference to conceptual foundations of “traditional” marketing strategies through the value creation goal. Finally, the paper questions the relevance of the traditional dichotomy between global standardization and localization.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jonathan A.J. Wilson and John Grant

The purpose of this paper is to debate what (if anything) is Islamic marketing? And link developments in this field to the wider marketing paradigm.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to debate what (if anything) is Islamic marketing? And link developments in this field to the wider marketing paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological antipositivist review of key case examples, drawing from 40 years of the authors' collective professional experiences; and field notes investigating approximately 1,000 brand marketing media reports, and 32 in‐depth interviews – as industry active academic practitioners. Supporting this, literature searches covered the fields of marketing, cultural studies, anthropology, contemporary religion, post‐structuralism and natural philosophy.

Findings

Marketing is both a concept and lived experience, manifest in the competitive exchange of commoditised thoughts, feelings, actions and objects – between engaged individuals and collectives. For many reasons, Islamic and Brand agendas/imperatives have risen in the consciousness and practises of Muslims and non‐Muslims globally, through social interactions. These have placed Islamic, brand and marketing practises in the spotlight, singularly and collectively. On the surface, many have considered whether Islamic marketing is a truism, a phenomenon, a noumenon, an ideology, or even a paradigm? The paper suggests that it represents a new focal phase “torchbearer”, as a conspicuous and necessary challenger strain towards convention, supporting fit for purpose marketing – just as “green” and “digital” marketing have previously, and continue to do so.

Research limitations/implications

This is a viewpoint piece, which whilst based upon the experiences of two authors, draws from their varied practitioner‐engaged action research, as collaborators and participants. To this end they adopt a standpoint, which argues for marketing being an applied science, rejecting approaches that encourage academic/practitioner divides.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners should resist the temptation to study and practice the field with a silo mentality. Marketing is not monolithic, nor is Islamic marketing necessarily a new phenomenon, or discrete sub‐set. Muslims have always engaged in marketing practices – offering symbolic and functional value globally.

Originality/value

The paper presents the following key argument: that Islamic Marketing is (while connected to the Islamic faith, heritage and cultural milieu) most usefully described and analysed as a differentiated wave within marketing activities and consumption, spearheaded currently by Muslims and non‐Muslims alike. And hence that it can be related to other developments in the marketing field, where marketing moves through evolutionary and revolutionary phases of meaning and practice, while grappling with new challenges and channels, in order to maintain its relevance and efficacy.

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2022

Aaron Ahuvia, Elif Izberk-Bilgin and Kyungwon Lee

Building meaningful relationships between consumers and service brands has received significant attention. This paper aims to explore how brand love in services – a…

Abstract

Purpose

Building meaningful relationships between consumers and service brands has received significant attention. This paper aims to explore how brand love in services – a relationship between the consumer and the service brand – is created through relationships between the consumer and other people. Specifically, we explore how brand love is created through the social relationships consumers form with other consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper synthesizes the literature on consumer-brand relationships, brand community, social support and service providers, psychological ownership and brand love in the context of services.

Findings

This paper suggests that consumers love brands that are meaningful to them. Brands can become more meaningful to consumers by facilitating interpersonal connections and helping consumers define their identity. The connection between social relationships with other consumers and brand love is mediated by the consumer's level of perceived membership in the community. For some consumers, perceived membership grows to the point of becoming perceived psychological ownership of the community, where the consumer feels a sense of responsibility for the brand's and the community's well-being.

Originality/value

This paper advances theoretical understanding of how brand love operates in services and how it can be enhanced through services’ management.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Jonathan A.J. Wilson

The purpose of this paper is two‐fold: first, to reflect on the subject discipline of Islamic marketing and connecting activities in the Journal of Islamic Marketing. And…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two‐fold: first, to reflect on the subject discipline of Islamic marketing and connecting activities in the Journal of Islamic Marketing. And, second, to capture key discussions and experiences, with the aim of refining definitions and approaches; in order to set a clear vision for scholarship in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

Expert knowledge elicitation from literature, key practitioners and academics, whilst serving on the Editorial Advisory Board; using participant observation methods and the Socratic elenchus. Data were gathered whilst the author presented at conferences and held a series of guest lectures, over a two‐year period in: India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and UK.

Findings

The term “Islamic marketing” is still very new, and reflective of an emergent phenomenon which stretches across the Muslim world and beyond. It draws from established subject disciplines in Business and Management, but also reaches into areas of Islamic studies and other social sciences. Furthermore, its interest and applicability has garnered support from those regardless of any Islamic faith. As such, there are varying perspective and standpoints, which have raised discussions as to how this phenomenon should be defined and understood; and moving forward should be researched and served by practitioners.

Originality/value

This paper gives consideration to a fan of opinions and the challenges faced, as are commonplace with any newly identified phenomenon. In addition, two models are offered as a basis for understanding how research can be undertaken, which has to balance two axes: Islamic studies and marketing; and Heterodoxy and orthodoxy.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Suharni Maulan, Nor Asiah Omar and Maisarah Ahmad

The main purpose of this paper is to develop a reliable and valid scale for measuring halal brand association (HalBA) for Islamic banks. Brand association is a core…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to develop a reliable and valid scale for measuring halal brand association (HalBA) for Islamic banks. Brand association is a core dimension of brand equity that Islamic bank managers need to develop to maintain competitiveness. Using the process proposed by Churchill for developing measures of marketing constructs, an instrument to assess HalBA for Islamic bank is formulated.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology consists of developing the scale based on a literature review and qualitative method. The proposed scale is then purified and validated through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).

Findings

Based on the EFA and CFA, the result reveals that HalBA for Islamic banks contains 15 attributes which can be categorized into three dimensions: Shari’ah-compliant association, God-consciousness association and corporate social responsibility association.

Practical implications

The scale developed could assist practitioners in further understanding the dimensions and measurement of halal bank association, particularly in Islamic banking institutions. Knowledge of the dimensions of HalBA that customers seek from an Islamic bank can help managers and marketers to design branding strategies that better meet the needs of consumers, thereby increasing their satisfaction and loyalty.

Originality/value

The concept of brand association has been explored primarily from a conventional marketing perspective. This study offers a new dimension of HalBA in the context of Islamic banks.

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Abid Mahmood Muhammad, Mohamed Bilal Basha and Gail AlHafidh

The purpose of this paper is to develop, measure and empirically validate the promotional techniques adopted by Islamic banks and the effect of these methods on consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop, measure and empirically validate the promotional techniques adopted by Islamic banks and the effect of these methods on consumer interest in Islamic banking products and services in the UAE (United Arab Emirates).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through 250 questionnaires distributed randomly to customers of five leading UAE Islamic banks and, following outlier analysis, the final sample size was reduced to 205, representing a sample of 82% of polled respondents. Multiple regression analysis was used on four key factor determinants that contributed towards the customers’ attitude in determining the most influential promotional strategies adopted by the Islamic banks.

Findings

The study found that the promotional strategies adopted by the UAE Islamic banking sector are having a significant impact on customer attitude towards Islamic banking products and services. The use of mass media has been partially successful, while the use of social media as a promotional tool is predicted to further enhance competitiveness for the UAE Islamic banking industry.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to five leading UAE Islamic banks and a specified set of promotional techniques nevertheless its findings have potential implications and can be extended and validated through studying the customers’ attitude towards promotion techniques used by Islamic banks in the GCC and MENA regions.

Originality/value

This paper adds value to the limited research on modern marketing and promotional strategies adopted by UAE-based Islamic banks and while regionally specific, it is valuable in its potential application to the Islamic banking sector in the entire GCC and MENA region.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2020

Richa Joshi and Prerna Garg

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of contemporary consumer-brand relationships in predicting brand sacredness, brand fidelity and propensity to spread word…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of contemporary consumer-brand relationships in predicting brand sacredness, brand fidelity and propensity to spread word of mouth (WOM) in the context of “halal” cosmetic brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed research framework has been empirically tested by collecting responses from 403 Muslim respondents of diverse demographics. Structural equation modelling has been used for exploring the underlying relationships between emotions associated with halal brands.

Findings

All the proposed hypotheses were positively significant, thus confirming that brand love is significantly affected by brand trust, brand image, self-congruence and brand experience. Further, brand love acts as a significant determinant in shaping brand sacredness, brand fidelity and WOM.

Research limitations/implications

The study has made a significant contribution by exploring the intensity of brand love and its effect on relationship-maintenance triad in halal cosmetic brands in India.

Practical implications

Marketers must understand the emotional side of brands to create synergy in their marketing efforts. Moreover, in the case of religious or faith-based brands, attainment of the highest order of brand love can play a revolutionary role for long-term growth.

Originality/value

In the context of halal cosmetic brands in India, this study has offered a new perspective by extending the literature on consumer-brand relationships. The use of brand fidelity and brand sacredness has enhanced the effectiveness of emotions with which consumers have been looking at brands for ages.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Sri Wahyuni and Nani Fitriani

Brand loyalty reveals about such important issues as brand personality and brand bond. This study mainly examines the influence of brand aura on brand loyalty management…

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Abstract

Purpose

Brand loyalty reveals about such important issues as brand personality and brand bond. This study mainly examines the influence of brand aura on brand loyalty management. The study aims to inform strategic aspects of brand aura. The authors conduct an analysis of prominent brands of sharia commercial brand saving product in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an exploratory research, using sample of 277 respondents of Islamic bank customers in five major cities in Indonesia (Semarang, Yogyakarta, Surabaya, Bandung and Jakarta). The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) technique with AMOS (analysis of moment structure) program to examine the influence of brand religiosity aura toward brand loyalty.

Findings

The finding reveals the importance of brand aura as valuable moderating dimension of brand personality and brand bond relationship. The study found brand religiosity aura as a valuable determinant in the marketing strategies for Indonesia Islamic banking. Brand religiosity aura contributed to the development of the concept of marketing management through its impact to the positive attitude of Islamic banking saving customers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors describe conclusion with a consideration of the findings’ implications for conceptualizing future researchs and practicing brand managers.

Originality/value

This study originates in conceptualizing the brand religiosity aura to mediate the brand personality and brand emotional attachment in brand management and marketing management as well as to increase brand loyalty.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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