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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Ihsan Isik

This paper analyzes the responsiveness of different ownership forms to changing business environment by drawing on Turkish experience.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzes the responsiveness of different ownership forms to changing business environment by drawing on Turkish experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is conducted in two stages. In the first stage, the paper uses Malmquist index theory, to estimate the total factor productivity change, technological change, efficiency change, pure efficiency change and scale efficiency change indexes for the Turkish banks. In the second stage, utilizing the generalized least regression format, it examines the significance of the productivity differences between different ownership forms after controlling for size and changes in the macro‐economy.

Findings

Under the “traditional banking definition,” productivity growth during the period was 1.2 percent for state banks, 3.9 percent for private banks and 14.2 percent for foreign banks. Under the “non‐traditional banking definition,” the productivity gain over the period was 2.9 percent for state banks, 9.5 percent for private banks and 17.0 percent for foreign banks.

Research limitations/implications

The future research can extend the data set and may include more explanatory factors to characterize the bank forms that record the fastest productivity growth.

Practical implications

Private ownership appears to be more adaptive to new environment. Foreign banks can be used as a policy instrument to induce efficiency and productivity improvements in local banking industries. Liberalization of markets through competition boosts economic performance.

Originality/value

In analyzing impacts of reforms, the significance of inter‐temporal change should be tested to better guide regulators, investors and managers.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Louise Racine, Isil Isik Andsoy and Sithokozile Maposa

This paper aims to discuss the barriers to preventative breast cancer screening (BCS) among Muslim Syrian refugee women in a Western Canadian Prairie city.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the barriers to preventative breast cancer screening (BCS) among Muslim Syrian refugee women in a Western Canadian Prairie city.

Design/methodology/approach

Situated within a larger mixed-method study aimed at identifying barriers and facilitators to breast cancer (BC) preventative practices, the authors interviewed three key informants to get an in-depth understanding of the cultural, religious and social factors affecting knowledge of BC and BCS practices among Muslim Syrian refugee women.

Findings

Qualitative findings confirm quantitative results revealing that knowledge about BC and cultural and religious barriers on gender might translate into poor health outcomes for Muslim Syrian refugee women in a Western Canadian city.

Research limitations/implications

This research has limitations related to the sample size and the lack of generalizability to all refugee women. Results indicate the need to develop culturally tailored intervention programs to increase breast awareness and participation in breast-self-examination, clinical breast examination and mammography. The study has implications for health-care policy. Muslim Syrian refugee women need to be educated about BC upon arrival in Canada to counteract low participation rates, promote positive health outcomes and decrease potential costs to the health-care system.

Originality/value

Evidence on Muslim Syrian refugee women’s knowledge and beliefs on BC is sparse. This study addressed this gap by documenting a lack of knowledge and barriers to BCS among Muslim Syrian refugee women.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2018

Kavilal E.G., Shanmugam Prasanna Venkatesan and Joshi Sanket

Easily employable quantitative supply chain complexity (SCC) measures considering the significant dimensions of complexity as well as the drivers that represent those…

Abstract

Purpose

Easily employable quantitative supply chain complexity (SCC) measures considering the significant dimensions of complexity as well as the drivers that represent those dimensions are limited in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated interpretive structural modeling (ISM) and a graph-theoretic approach to quantify SCC by a single numerical index considering the interdependence and the inheritance of the SCC drivers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 18 SCC drivers identified from the literature are clustered according to the significant dimensions of complexity. The interdependencies established through ISM and inheritance values of SCC drivers are mapped into a Variable Permanent Matrix (VPM). The permanent function of this VPM is then computed and the resulting single numerical index is the measure of SCC.

Findings

A scale is proposed by computing the minimum and maximum threshold values of SCC with the help of expert opinions of the Indian automotive industry. The complexity of commercial and passenger vehicle sectors within the automotive industry is measured and compared using the proposed scale. From the results, it is identified that the number of suppliers, increase in spare-parts due to shortened product life-cycle and demand uncertainties increase the SCC of the passenger vehicle sector, while number of parts, products and processes, variety of products and process and unreliability of suppliers increase the complexity of the commercial vehicle sector. The result indicates that various SCC drivers have a different impact on determining the SCC level of these two sectors.

Originality/value

The authors propose an integrated method that can be readily applied to measure and quantify SCC considering the significant dimensions of complexity as well as the interdependence and the inheritance of the SCC drivers that contribute to those dimensions. This index further helps to compare the complexity of the supply chain which varies between industries.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Mehmet Fatih Acar, Selim Zaim, Mine Isik and Fethi Calisir

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactions among enterprise resource planning (ERP) practices, supply chain orientation (SCO), and operational…

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2036

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactions among enterprise resource planning (ERP) practices, supply chain orientation (SCO), and operational performance (OPER) by forming a macro perspective based on a scientific foundation powered by a resource-based view.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to verify the underlying dimensions of SCO and ERP practices. The covariance-based structural equation modeling was employed to test the direct and indirect effects of SCO and ERP practices constructs on OPER.

Findings

Results revealed that SCO has significant and positive effects on OPER, whereas ERP practices do not. Moreover, the indirect effect of ERP practices with the mediating effects of SCO is stronger than their direct effects. In addition, the origin of the ERP practices is found to be an important critical success factor.

Originality/value

Although much research has investigated the direct effect of ERP practices on performance, this study points out the importance of SCO in observing the stronger impacts of ERP practices.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2018

Kamalendra Kumar Tripathi and Kumar Neeraj Jha

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and rank the success attributes and success factors of the construction organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and rank the success attributes and success factors of the construction organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The viewpoints of the experts engaged in Indian construction industry were used to apply factor analysis and fuzzy preference relation with the help of a questionnaire survey.

Findings

The findings indicate that project factor is the most important factor, whereas favourable market and marketing team is the least important factor. Among the success attributes, the availability of qualified staff is the most important attribute, and health and safety management plan is the least important attribute.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of this study are based on the viewpoint of the experts of construction organisations engaged in building projects in India.

Practical implications

The study can be used as a yardstick for the top management of construction organisations to manage their resources efficiently and to develop a strategy to be successful in this business.

Social implications

Indian construction industry provides direct and indirect employment to the people of India. Hence, the success of construction organisation will contribute to the development of the society and ultimately the nation.

Originality/value

In the earlier studies, researchers have used various statistical tools to identify and evaluate the alternatives for the success factors of construction organisations, but very few of them have tried to assign weights to those alternatives. The simple ranking of alternatives using various statistical analyses, such as mean and standard deviation, relative importance index, etc., is not much useful unless their relative weights are known. With the help of the present study, the authors have tried to overcome the shortcomings of the previous research works.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Isik Oguzertem

The purpose of this paper is to find the answers of the following question: what are the barriers to integrating displaced populations into labor markets and what are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find the answers of the following question: what are the barriers to integrating displaced populations into labor markets and what are possible steps to overcome them?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on government statistics, published reports and independent research that the author conducted in Turkey regarding the crisis in Syria from 2016 to 2018.

Findings

A reactionary government policy toward Syrian refugees lacks an overarching rights-based approach that includes the participation of all stakeholders and considers local dynamics. This results in a bleak prospect for enhancing the livelihood security of Syrian refugees and vulnerable members of host communities in Turkey. An alternative approach leveraging opportunities for synergies between refugee and host communities is proposed.

Originality/value

This piece proposes an original framework for integrating displaced populations into labor markets through the acronym CLEAR: certainty of status, language training, education opportunities, aid as an investment and the right to work.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Anton Manfreda, Brina Buh and Mojca Indihar Štemberger

There is very little literature about improving and managing knowledge-intensive business processes (KIBPs). Since innovation plays an important role in knowledge work…

Abstract

Purpose

There is very little literature about improving and managing knowledge-intensive business processes (KIBPs). Since innovation plays an important role in knowledge work, these processes are different from traditional business processes, for which most business process management (BPM) methods have been developed, and therefore KIBPs should be improved differently. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of BPM in the case of KIBPs by describing some methods that can be applied to manage and improve KIBPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study of a BPM project in the public sector, where most processes are knowledge-intensive. In conducting the longitudinal case study, established guidelines for interpretive case study research were followed. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected.

Findings

The paper presents some findings about the methods that can be applied for BPM in the case of KIBPs. It shows that the main phases of a BPM project can be the same as in a typical project; however, within each project phase different methods have to be applied. Appropriate methods for modelling the existing processes were workshops and interviews. Qualitative methods were suitable for the analysis phase, while it was not necessary to develop detailed to-be models in the business process redesign phase.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the body of knowledge on BPM in the case of KIBPs. Previous findings from the literature claiming that participative, incremental and continuous methods are suitable for improving KIBPs were confirmed. The case study also showed that proper project management, communication, the active role of top management and the involvement of external consultants during BPM projects are very important.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2018

Denise Salin, Renee Cowan, Oluwakemi Adewumi, Eleni Apospori, Jaime Bochantin, Premilla D’Cruz, Nikola Djurkovic, Katarzyna Durniat, Jordi Escartín, Jing Guo, Idil Išik, Sabine T. Koeszegi, Darcy McCormack, Silvia Inés Monserrat and Eva Zedlacher

The purpose of this paper is to analyze cross-national and cross-cultural similarities and differences in perceptions and conceptualizations of workplace bullying among…

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2791

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze cross-national and cross-cultural similarities and differences in perceptions and conceptualizations of workplace bullying among human resource professionals (HRPs). Particular emphasis was given to what kind of behaviors are considered as bullying in different countries and what criteria interviewees use to decide whether a particular behavior is bullying or not.

Design/methodology/approach

HRPs in 13 different countries/regions (n=199), spanning all continents and all GLOBE cultural clusters (House et al., 2004), were interviewed and a qualitative content analysis was carried out.

Findings

Whereas interviewees across the different countries largely saw personal harassment and physical intimidation as bullying, work-related negative acts and social exclusion were construed very differently in the different countries. Repetition, negative effects on the target, intention to harm, and lack of a business case were decision criteria typically used by interviewees across the globe – other criteria varied by country.

Practical implications

The results help HRPs working in multinational organizations understand different perceptions of negative acts.

Originality/value

The findings point to the importance of cultural factors, such as power distance and performance orientation, and other contextual factors, such as economy and legislation for understanding varying conceptualizations of bullying.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Douglas Rafael Veit, Daniel Pacheco Lacerda, Luis Felipe Riehs Camargo, Liane Mahlmann Kipper and Aline Dresch

Research in business processes has been developed around a disciplinary approach toward the production of traditional knowledge, known as Mode 1. The problems studied with…

Abstract

Purpose

Research in business processes has been developed around a disciplinary approach toward the production of traditional knowledge, known as Mode 1. The problems studied with this approach are solved in a context in which academic knowledge prevails, with no major concerns regarding its practical applicability. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to propose a structure for knowledge production based on Mode 2 for business process researches.

Design/methodology/approach

A bibliometric research was conducted to define and conceptualize the classes of disciplinary problems, by assessing the years 2007-2012 of the Business Process Management Journal publications.

Findings

A framework for the Mode 2 knowledge production was proposed in the development of research in business process and conceptualized classes of problems related to this issue.

Research limitations/implications

This work was carried out with specific focus on research in business process, so the defined classes of problems cannot be generalized.

Originality/value

The studies identified by this research are in the form of a disciplinary approach toward the production of traditional knowledge, known as Mode 1. This paper aims to fill the gap of a transdisciplinary production of knowledge and practical application, known as Mode 2 in the context of business process.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Teddy Chandra, Achmad Tavip Junaedi, Evelyn Wijaya and Martha Ng

The purpose of this paper is (1) to determine the factors that significantly influence the capital structure, (2) to determine the factors that significantly influence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is (1) to determine the factors that significantly influence the capital structure, (2) to determine the factors that significantly influence profitability, (3) to find the factors that significantly influence growth opportunities, (4) to find reciprocal influence between capital structure and profitability and (5) to find reciprocal influence between capital structure and growth opportunity.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of this research is a manufacturing company listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange during the period of 2010–2016. The number registered in the manufacturing sector is 144 companies. The sampling technique applied is purposive sampling. The fulfillment criteria are companies that have been approved before 2010. Another criterion is that the company is not delisting during the observation period. From that total of population, companies that meet the requirements are 117 companies. This observation was conducted for seven years since 2010–2016, so the center of the analysis of this research was a total of 819. The inferential statistics method used to analyze the research data is generalized structural component analysis (GSCA).

Findings

The results of this study indicate that (1) the factors that influence the capital structure include effective tax rate, financial flexibility, growth, uniqueness, asset Utilization, firm size and tangibility; (2) factors that affect profitability include liquidity, growth, firm age, uniqueness, tangibility, volatility, advertising and asset turnover; (3) growth opportunity have a negative and significant influence on capital structure. This means an increase in growth opportunity can be defined as an increase in depreciation that will not be used as collateral for managers to increase debt. This increase in debt will have an impact on reducing growth opportunities; (4) profitability and capital structure have a two-way causality relationship, which means they influence each other and (5) capital structure and growth opportunities have a negative reciprocal relationship.

Originality/value

The authenticity of the study is implied in the following explanation: The authors try to examine the reciprocal effect of capital structure on profitability and capital structure on growth opportunities and the factors that influence these two endogenous variables that have never been done by previous researchers. This research is motivated by research conducted by (Chathoth and Olsen, 2007; Jian-Shen Chen et al., 2009; Yang et al., 2010) using the structural equation model (SEM). However, this study uses GSCA as a method of research analysis.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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