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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Isao T Matsumoto, John Stapleton, Jacqueline Glass and Tony Thorpe

As we move into a knowledge economy, employee skills are fast becoming an organization’s most valuable asset. Fundamental to successfully completing the complex range of…

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1102

Abstract

As we move into a knowledge economy, employee skills are fast becoming an organization’s most valuable asset. Fundamental to successfully completing the complex range of tasks presented by construction projects is bringing together individuals with the correct balance of skills. No one individual has the complete set of skills to do everything themselves, which makes the team only as strong as its weakest link. Sponsored by a leading UK‐based engineering design consultancy, a specification for a technologically driven skills management system was developed. It allowed the organization, its teams and the employees, to better measure, manage and develop their skill capabilities effectively. Key issues addressed by the paper include how skill ability can be measured, how skills can be structured, and how these measurements and structure can be combined to generate skills reports. The development of a prototype application, based on the above mentioned specification, tested the validity of the specification, and demonstrated to the sponsor the benefits that can be achieved by a systematic and practical approach to capturing, reviewing, planning and managing employee skills. It also highlighted the important business rationale for using such systems.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Isao T. Matsumoto, John Stapleton, Jacqueline Glass and Tony Thorpe

Organisations must continually innovate to remain competitive. A by‐product of innovation is new knowledge. In a knowledge economy, an organisation's ability to manage its

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2009

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations must continually innovate to remain competitive. A by‐product of innovation is new knowledge. In a knowledge economy, an organisation's ability to manage its knowledge can mean the difference between commercial success and failure. A key aspect of being able to manage knowledge is the ability to identify and capture it. This paper aims to present the development of the knowledge‐capture report (KCR) and the results of its use at the third TeamWork demonstration event for collaborative working.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantifying the number of discrete pieces of knowledge captured in the KCR and categorising the type and quantity of knowledge captured demonstrate the practicality and effectiveness of the KCR in a dynamic multidisciplinary design team environment.

Findings

The different approaches that were observed and adopted by the participants using the KCR highlight a number of key issues that need to be considered when attempting to capture knowledge in a constantly evolving design environment.

Originality/value

The use of the KCR by a wide range of industry practitioners demonstrates a quick, effective and low‐cost approach to capturing project knowledge and events. It could be adopted easily by the engineering and construction (AEC) industry as an entry point to managing knowledge, particularly in complex, multi‐disciplinary design environments.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Isao T Matsumoto, John Stapleton, Jacqueline Glass and Tony Thorpe

Process mapping can lead to a more holistic understanding of how an organisation works. This paper seeks to discuss how an engineering design consultancy, which had…

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1563

Abstract

Purpose

Process mapping can lead to a more holistic understanding of how an organisation works. This paper seeks to discuss how an engineering design consultancy, which had developed a series of process maps on the design of steel frame buildings, developed a powerful management tool, the Management Briefing Sheet which has yielded numerous additional benefits enabling practice to be improved and quality procedures more easily accessed.

Design/methodology/approach

To maximise the knowledge and expertise of its supply chain partners and to better understand how it designed steel‐framed buildings, the engineering design consultancy undertook a process‐mapping exercise. Various techniques for documenting the process were considered, but a modified IDEF notation was chosen for its ability to capture the iterative nature of the design process and its methodical approach for deconstructing complicated activities.

Findings

Process‐mapping exercises can change the way organisations work and make them more efficient, but to do this the changes that would lead to improvements need to be implemented successfully. Carrying out a process‐mapping exercise in isolation from the end‐user can lead to complications.

Research limitations/implications

The key obstacle to implementing change identified by the engineering design consultancy, with whom the MBS was developed, was delivering the knowledge acquired from the process analysis in a format that end‐users could understand easily and adopt effectively.

Originality/value

This article will be of significant use to any organisation wishing to maximise the knowledge and expertise of its supply chain partners and identify inefficient working practices.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

James Bishop, Dino Bouchlaghem, Jacqueline Glass and Isao Matsumoto

The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of critical success factors, which ensure the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, with particular focus on

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4772

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of critical success factors, which ensure the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, with particular focus on the effect of people‐oriented success factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of knowledge management literature, substantiated by ten qualitative interviews with leading academics and industrial representatives in the field of knowledge management in the construction industry.

Findings

The research suggests that organisations need to consider several key areas, in particular, the processes and practices undertaken to understand and define knowledge management, the implementation of dedicated champions, the integration of the initiative into the business, and effective communication of its benefits to members of staff. Each of these factors will have a direct bearing on the level of effectiveness reached by an organisation's knowledge management initiative.

Research limitations/implications

The industry‐based interviewees were all strategic‐level managers. This means that, in relation to the application of knowledge management initiatives, they adopt primarily managerial roles. Further interviews with the practitioners of these initiatives would be beneficial in reflecting the more “hands‐on” perspective of knowledge management implementation.

Originality/value

A holistic overview of the best‐practice for maximising the effectiveness of a knowledge management initiative by addressing the issues, which concern the people involved with its implementation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2020

Yuyue Guo and Shudong Lin

This paper aims to investigate the effects on material performance in the epoxy acrylate resin system owing to the existence of the different ring of the cyclic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects on material performance in the epoxy acrylate resin system owing to the existence of the different ring of the cyclic methacrylate. In this paper, cyclic methacrylate as diluents was added into epoxy acrylate (EA) resin by ultraviolet (UV)-cured polymerization to investigate the effects on material performance owing to the existence of the different rings.

Design/methodology/approach

EA and 1-adamantyl methacrylate were synthesized by traditional methods according to previous papers, respectively. After adding different cyclic methacrylate as diluents to the EA oligomers, the system was exposed to the UV-light for polymerization.

Findings

The hydrophobic properties of the cured materials were increased slightly because of the alkyl groups from the methacrylate. The thermal stabilities and mechanical properties of the resins were enhanced by the cyclic diluents with the hard segments. Meanwhile, the crosslink density of the polymer decreased with the bulky group like adamantly owing to its huge structure.

Research limitations/implications

The cyclic methacrylates were introduced into EA oligomers for decreasing the viscosity and increasing the materials performances, which could be recognized as new diluents applied in UV-cued polymerization.

Originality/value

The results of this study will be conducive to fabricate EA resins possessed with high thermal stabilities and mechanical properties by convenient UV-cured polymerization.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Christine Connolly

The purpose of this paper is to study the scientific developments behind the announcement of a sensor mimicking the human skin.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the scientific developments behind the announcement of a sensor mimicking the human skin.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief review of the potential applications and design constraints of the robot skin is followed by an examination of published papers that trace its development.

Findings

When sensors are embedded in an elastic matrix, connecting wires and mechanical attachments undermine the mechanical properties of that matrix. Progressive miniaturisation of the sensing devices, and ingenious methods of supplying power and communicating data, have gradually overcome this problem.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the integration of innovative sensing, signal processing and power‐supply technologies.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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