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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Amitabh Anand, Isabelle Walsh and Sandra Moffett

Despite the strong focus on virtues in firms, humility is little recognized in the management literature and, more particularly in the literature about knowledge sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the strong focus on virtues in firms, humility is little recognized in the management literature and, more particularly in the literature about knowledge sharing (KS). Despite efforts to foster KS among employees in firms, the effectiveness of this process narrows down to the dyadic relationship between the knowledge seeker and provider within firm. This paper aims to investigate the role of humility in the KS process in dyadic activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertake an exploratory investigation to fill some of the gaps found in the literature. The paper draws insights from psychology, history, religion, current events and management literature.

Findings

The authors identify several individual propensities that help predict humility towards sharing knowledge from seeker (humble knowledge-inquiry) and provider perspectives (humble response). They propose a new conceptual process model of KS with humility as an important variable to consider. This work highlights several promising directions for future research.

Originality/value

As per the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that investigates the role of humility in knowledge sharing from dyadic perspective. The authors also introduce concepts of humble knowledge inquiry and humble response in a dyadic context for effective knowledge sharing process.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Amitabh Anand and Isabelle Walsh

The purpose of this study is to attempt to answer the following questions: Are people generous at work places? How often do we see people willing to share, when someone…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to attempt to answer the following questions: Are people generous at work places? How often do we see people willing to share, when someone seeks knowledge from them without any expectation? What’s the point in having knowledge when somebody doesn’t share it? Then again, why do firms, reward employees to share their knowledge? ¬ ¬? Does sharing knowledge between people need a commercial acceptance or rewarding inspiration? In firms, people, who do not have relevant work-related knowledge, seek it from others. Thus, this implies that people can either share their knowledge or hoard knowledge or share partial knowledge. This research shows that sharing knowledge has existed for centuries and has been practised through generosity, with proof that the more you share the more you obtain in return. The authors analyse the role of generosity in sharing knowledge by tracing insights from literature, religion, science and modern day management scholarly views, and they show how it can lead firms to succeed. In this paper, the authors will propose a direction for future researchers on how developing generosity helps towards sharing knowledge. They also propose a model of generosity based on literature and its interpretation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on extensive reviews of literature, articles and opinions from scholars. The authors use a keyword protocol to investigate articles from Google scholar and other sources on generosity and knowledge sharing.

Findings

This paper finds significant relationships and validated shreds of evidence on how generosity towards knowledge sharing has helped humanity in the past and how generosity can help firms to succeed.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind in trying to explore how developing generosity among people can play a role in facilitating knowledge sharing for firms to succeed. This further suggests a new direction of research for scholars engaged in exploring the role of generosity with a proposed model.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Marie-Hélène Gilbert, Julie Dextras-Gauthier, Pierre-Sébastien Fournier, André Côté, Isabelle Auclair and Mouna Knani

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the difficulties encountered in the hybrid roles of physician−managers (P−Ms), examine the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the difficulties encountered in the hybrid roles of physician−managers (P−Ms), examine the impact of organizational constraints on the role conflicts experienced by P−Ms and explore the different ways their two roles are integrated.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted, using six focus groups made up of clinical co-managers, medical directors and P−Ms. In all, 43 different people were interviewed to obtain their perceptions of the day-to-day realities of the role of the P−M. The data collected were subsequently validated.

Findings

Although the expectations of the different groups involved regarding the role of P−Ms are well understood and shared, there are significant organizational constraints affecting what P−Ms are able to do in their day-to-day activities, and these constraints can result in role conflicts for the people involved. Such constraints also affect the ways P−Ms integrate the two roles. The authors identify three role hybridization profiles.

Practical implications

The results afford a better understanding of how organizational constraints might be used as levers of organizational change to achieve a better hybridization of the dual roles of P−Ms.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to reach beyond a simple identification of constraints affecting the dual roles of P−Ms by analyzing how such constraints impact on these professionals’ day-to-day activities. Results also enable us to further refine Katz and Kahn’s (1966) role model, in addition to identifying hybridization profiles.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Isabelle Vandangeon-Derumez, Amina Djedidi and Eila Szendy

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the role of experience in learning about, and preparing for, change management.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the role of experience in learning about, and preparing for, change management.

Design/methodology/approach

A course with a different approach to teaching about change management has been proposed to learners. It uses drawing, simulation and exploration of case studies. Learners wrote reports on change management before and after the course and these reports were then thematically analyzed.

Findings

Results show the specific ways in which the course places learners in a position to: experience change, use their collective experiences, acquire and develop practical knowledge, and prepare themselves for change. Capitalizing on such experiences of change could arguably become an integral part of an organization’s “readiness to change” strategy.

Research limitations/implications

It would be useful to further investigate what happens after this experience by interviewing learners, later on, in order to analyze how they subsequently use, in a real professional environment, such knowledge and skills acquired during the learning process.

Practical implications

Using this approach, future managers are arguably better prepared to implement change. Capitalizing on such experiences of change could become part of an organization’s “readiness for change” strategy.

Social implications

The benefits of experiencing change management in a learning environment will only be reaped when firms allocate time and space to such experiential learning. This entails going beyond managing this change to a deeper perspective by identifying key elements to maintain and/or enhance one’s experience of managing change.

Originality/value

The value of the present paper lies in individual and collective experience as a key element to prepare managers to change management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Manon Arcand, Sandrine PromTep, Isabelle Brun and Lova Rajaobelina

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the multidimensional concept of mobile banking service quality (security/privacy, practicity, design/aesthetics, enjoyment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the multidimensional concept of mobile banking service quality (security/privacy, practicity, design/aesthetics, enjoyment and sociality) and the impact of the latter on the quality of the relationship (commitment, trust and satisfaction) between consumers and their primary financial institution.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted using a sample of 375 respondents, all owners of a mobile device and all accustomed to conducting banking activities on mobile platforms. Results were analyzed using structural modeling techniques (EQS 6.1).

Findings

Findings confirm that trust significantly and positively impacts commitment/satisfaction. Mobile banking service quality dimensions also influence trust and commitment/satisfaction. Trust is associated with security/privacy and practicity (regarded as utilitarian factors), while commitment/satisfaction is driven by enjoyment and sociality (dimensions more hedonic by nature). No link is found between interface design and either trust or commitment/satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study contributes to bank marketing theory since it is the first to demonstrate how key mobile banking service quality dimensions drive customer perceptions of relationship quality. In doing so, this research extends beyond mobile adoption (short term) by addressing customer engagement with financial institutions and issues relating to relationship quality (long term). Regarding managerial implications, findings signal to marketers in the financial services industry the importance of not underestimating the power of hedonic factors (sociality and enjoyment) when developing mobile platforms. These dimensions are often overlooked in the banking industry, a sector in which consumers are believed to be mostly driven by utilitarian motives.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Isabelle Collin-Lachaud and Mbaye Fall Diallo

This research seeks to investigate how in-store mobile use affects store loyalty directly or indirectly via the mediation of store value and whether social influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to investigate how in-store mobile use affects store loyalty directly or indirectly via the mediation of store value and whether social influence moderates such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 862 actual customers from a market research company panel, we used structural equation modelling to test a series of research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show a positive but weak effect of in-store smartphone use on loyalty. This effect is significantly mediated by the store’s hedonic and symbolic value dimensions, but not by its utilitarian value. This research also uncovers significant moderation effects of social influence on the relationships investigated. The effect of in-store smartphone use on store loyalty is stronger when social influence is lower. However, the effects of hedonic and symbolic store value are stronger when social influence is higher.

Research limitations/implications

This research is carried out in one country (France). It focuses on social influence through in-store mobile phone use; it would also be useful to consider physical social influence.

Practical implications

Retailers should position their stores on specific value dimensions and use social influence appropriately to improve loyalty. For instance, utilitarian value should be offered to customers with low social influence. To prevent negative social influence, retailers could develop “controlled” social influence through their own private mobile app to favour interaction.

Originality/value

This research underlines the critical role of store value and social influence on the relationships between smartphone use and store loyalty. It shows that the effects of value dimensions (utilitarian, hedonic and symbolic) on loyalty differ depending on social influence level.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Isabelle Brun, Lova Rajaobelina and Line Ricard

The purpose of this paper is to propose a reliable and valid integrative scale for online relationship quality based on both the relationship marketing and electronic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a reliable and valid integrative scale for online relationship quality based on both the relationship marketing and electronic commerce literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale was developed using the approach put forward by Churchill (1979). The scale development and validation process includes a qualitative exploratory phase, three pre-tests and a final study using an online questionnaire (476 members of a consumer panel).

Findings

The findings support a third-order integrative model of online relationship quality composed of three dimensions (trust, commitment and satisfaction). The final scale is composed of 21 items.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows a lack of discrimination between satisfaction and trust, which other studies have also found. As the scale is validated in only one sector, online banking, it should be tested and replicated in other contexts (e.g. insurance).

Practical implications

An instrument for assessing the quality of online relationships between banks and consumers is important for marketing professionals who want to determine their relational positioning and focus on those dimensions that promote long-term online relationships. The scale developed here can be used to assess customers’ perceptions of the quality of the relationship with an online financial institution, to segment those customers more effectively, and to improve targeting of marketing strategies and activities.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the enrichment of the body of theory and provides researchers with a tool for the further investigation of the quality of online relationships.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Isabelle Szmigin and Gordon Foxall

Considers the history and current position of interpretive consumer research within the marketing paradigm. It focuses on the conflict that has developed between the…

Abstract

Considers the history and current position of interpretive consumer research within the marketing paradigm. It focuses on the conflict that has developed between the positivist tradition and the relatively new interpretive approach. In doing so it considers the merits of interpretive research in consumer behaviour and criticisms made against it. Methodological issues centring on the trustworthiness of this type of research are explored, as well as the friction that traditionally has existed between art and science. An argument is made for an inclusive rather than exclusive approach, allowing the existence of differing approaches and assuming each has a contribution to make to the furtherance of consumer behaviour research.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Deirdre O'Loughlin, Isabelle Szmigin and Peter Turnbull

This study investigates the nature of customer‐supplier interaction that currently exists within Irish retail financial services. Specifically, issues relating to the…

Abstract

This study investigates the nature of customer‐supplier interaction that currently exists within Irish retail financial services. Specifically, issues relating to the role, meaning and importance of financial service interaction within the context of current demand‐ and supply‐side relationship marketing issues are explored. Although the literature proposes that the relationship marketing (RM) approach is particularly applicable to the financial services sector, the research findings raise questions as to the appropriateness of general RM theory to the current nature of interaction between consumers and their financial services providers. In an age of increased depersonalisation and automation impacting upon financial service quality and delivery, the paper questions the relevance of the “relationship” concept and proposes the notion of an “experience” as a far more relevant and meaningful construct. The nature and importance of this experience to consumers is explored and three levels of customer experience are conceptualised which are identified as brand, transactional and relationship experience.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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