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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Laurent Tournois and Isabelle Aoun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the foundations of an Islamic market oriented cultural approach regarding its possible implementation by non‐Muslim firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the foundations of an Islamic market oriented cultural approach regarding its possible implementation by non‐Muslim firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a critical review of existing literature on Islamic marketing and branding. Related market oriented strategies (from a cultural perspective) are discussed regarding their possible implementation by non‐Muslim firms, particularly in the context of Lebanon.

Findings

It is found that the theoretical foundations and the results of existing research hold back the understanding and implementation by Western firms and marketers of Islamic marketing principles.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents only conceptual arguments; it does not include empirical examination at this stage. A quadrad is finally proposed in order to validate these arguments.

Practical implications

Western businesses are faced with many dilemmas when it comes to taking decisions based, in particular, on the understanding and the implementation of marketing with an Islamic root. The major challenge lies in responding successfully to the needs and requirements of Muslim customers through complying with Islamic principles and practices without alienating non‐Muslim customers.

Originality/value

Most of the existing research on Islamic marketing concerns Muslim firms, but few Western firms, when targeting both Muslim and non‐Muslim populations. The paper stresses the importance of expanding the frontiers of recent work on Islamically‐rooted market oriented strategies with reference to conceptual foundations of “traditional” marketing strategies through the value creation goal. Finally, the paper questions the relevance of the traditional dichotomy between global standardization and localization.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Kay Gallagher and James Pounder

Abstract

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Isabelle Aoun and Laurent Tournois

Branding in faith-based consumer markets, in which marketing practices, religion, and consumption intersect, is largely unexplored. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Branding in faith-based consumer markets, in which marketing practices, religion, and consumption intersect, is largely unexplored. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how brands integrate religious concerns into their strategies through Halal branding. The central logic of authors’ view is that branding applied in a particular consumer market (i.e., Muslim) could enrich dominant (Western) branding theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Although challenging, qualitative research offers a valuable lens in international marketing research in allowing researchers to study organizations and contexts in their natural settings, enabling a more holistic approach, instead of imposing one’s culturally informed pre-conceptions (Boyacigiller and Adler, 1991). In this regard, a multiple case study approach considering Halal cosmetic brands is used. A replication logic is applied in interpreting the data.

Findings

Holistic branding is a broader concept than what mainstream theory acknowledges; brand attributes go beyond the functional and emotional, offering insights into a spiritual dimension. The proposed model identifies attributes that reflect the brand’s worldview and contribute to holistic branding: spiritual ethos and belief system, sustainable and eco-ethical philosophy, wholesomeness and inclusiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research represents the initial step for faith-based/Halal branding; the discussion is confined to the cases under study. The results are not conclusive and require further empirical research to validate their broader applicability.

Practical implications

The study highlights the need for a comprehensive approach to branding of faith-based products. The Halal market (cosmetics and toiletries) may be attractive to companies that seek to widely develop products targeting faith-based Muslim consumer markets.

Originality/value

The study contributes to an area of growing concern from an academic point of view (i.e. Halal branding) by proposing to add a spiritual dimension to holistic branding. Several questions remain and should stimulate further research. Hence, researchers would be able to understand more clearly the meaning of the religious environment and the impact that environmental forces are likely to exert on business decisions.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Iris Reychav, Ofer Inbar, Tomer Simon, Roger McHaney and Lin Zhu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate enterprise social media systems and quantified gender and status influences on emotional content presented in these systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate enterprise social media systems and quantified gender and status influences on emotional content presented in these systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Internal social media messages were collected from a global software company running an enterprise social media system. An indirect observatory test using Berlo’s “source–message–channel–receiver” model served as a framework to evaluate sender, message, channel and receiver for each text. These texts were categorized by gender and status using text analytics with SAP SA to produce sentiment indications.

Findings

Results reveal women use positive language 2.1 times more than men. Senior managers express positive language 1.7 times more than non-managers, and feeling rules affect all genders and statuses, but not necessarily as predicted by theory. Other findings show that public messages contained less emotional content, and women expressed more positivity to lower status colleagues. Men expressed more positivity to those in higher positions. Many gender and status stereotypes found in face-to-face studies are also present in digital enterprise social networks.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include generalizability: all data were collected from a single enterprise social media system.

Practical implications

Managers establishing codes of conduct for social media use will find this research useful, particularly when promoting awareness of emotional expressiveness in online venues with subordinate colleagues.

Originality/value

This study offers a behavioral measurement approach free from validity issues found in self-reported surveys, direct observations and interviews. The collected data offered new perspectives on existing social theories within a new environment of computerized, enterprise social media.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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