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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Isabella M. Chaney

Over the last decade there has been an increase in the development of products sold as own label brands. The major UK grocery multiples have successfully employed this…

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1445

Abstract

Over the last decade there has been an increase in the development of products sold as own label brands. The major UK grocery multiples have successfully employed this strategy, gaining more than half the grocery market with their own branded products. Supermarkets have strengthened their own‐brands by changing their no‐frills, low‐cost strategy to one of quality at a competitive price. This trend has made a major impact not merely on the fmcg sector, but also on the alcoholic market including wine. Consumer research by the supermarkets has addressed both the contents of the bottle as well as the packaging. Labels on own‐label wines have had much attention paid to them on the quest to reflect a more upmarket image. The acceptance of the own‐label brand by consumers is a serious threat to established brands as own‐label brands are likely to grow at the expense of manufacturer brands.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Isabella M. Chaney

The existence and extent of consumers' external search effort has been deliberated by consumer behaviour theorists for several decades. Research has largely focused on…

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662

Abstract

The existence and extent of consumers' external search effort has been deliberated by consumer behaviour theorists for several decades. Research has largely focused on durable goods such as automobiles for which there is a high monetary risk. This study considers a non‐durable product, wine, where there are several hundred alternatives. Furthermore, knowledge of the product's attributes are difficult to assess by visual inspection of the product. Thus it is presumed that consumers would conduct a search for information prior to their purchase, in particular making use of expert opinion by reading wine reviews and books. Results show that there is very little external search effort undertaken prior to entering the store. Furthermore, the two highest ranked information sources, point of sale material and labels, are only rated somewhat important. Overall there is no one overriding information source but several sources cumulate to provide the information consumers require.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Isabella M. Chaney

This article focuses on the efforts of wine journalists to disseminate information. A content analysis is undertaken of articles in specialist wine magazines and weekend…

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1594

Abstract

This article focuses on the efforts of wine journalists to disseminate information. A content analysis is undertaken of articles in specialist wine magazines and weekend newspapers. This analysis is in the form of a comparative study based on the wine information for the three southern hemisphere countries of Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. When amount of column space devoted to each is assessed, it is evident that New Zealand, the smallest wine producing country of the three, is more positively favoured receiving a disproportionate amount of attention. However, an analysis of the information disseminated questions the value of the reviews.

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British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Isabella M. Chaney

Opinion leaders are important disseminators of information. Considers their relevance to the marketing of wine by assessing whether they are a reachable segment with…

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8124

Abstract

Opinion leaders are important disseminators of information. Considers their relevance to the marketing of wine by assessing whether they are a reachable segment with respect to their demography and information needs. The importance of information from articles, books and television programmes is significantly associated with opinion leadership status. Furthermore, opinion leadership status is significantly associated with technical information on wines. This group, who tend to be the “heavy” buyers, is an important segment on whom producers should focus their attentions. Identifying them, however, cannot be undertaken demographically but, rather, they should be isolated by their information‐seeking behaviour. Targeting them by ensuring a constant flow of wine journalism of a more technical nature will feed their quest for information with which to impress and/or influence others.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Isabella Chaney

Over the last two decades the United Kingdom has become a nation of wine‐drinkers. However, due to climatic conditions, very little is actually produced in the UK, Almost…

Abstract

Over the last two decades the United Kingdom has become a nation of wine‐drinkers. However, due to climatic conditions, very little is actually produced in the UK, Almost all the £6 billion market is made up of imported wine from all corners of the world. The traditional suppliers from France, Germany and Italy have, over recent times, been confronted with the wines from the New World. Supermarkets have led the way in stocking wines from both the traditional and New World countries. Furthermore, their attention to merchandising has been the catalyst for the surge in wine experimentation.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Isabella M. Chancy

Purchasing products based on their country‐of‐origin is often employed by consumers as it is a short cut in the often lengthy decision process. Researchers have studied…

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1061

Abstract

Purchasing products based on their country‐of‐origin is often employed by consumers as it is a short cut in the often lengthy decision process. Researchers have studied this country‐of‐origin phenomenon for several decades notably with an emphasis on durable goods understandably as durable goods tend to be high involvement purchases. The proliferation of brands and lack of knowledge can mean that wine too can be a complex purchase for many consumers. With the assistance of store displays by country many consumers use country‐of‐origin to simplify their wine choice. Generic wine promotions by individual countries further reinforce the country‐of‐origin concept for wine. This study sought to understand the level of understanding of certain countries as wine producers. Tourist‐based activities and price promotions were perceived as suitable strategies for generic bodies. These facilitate the purchase of wines from a country for the first time. The research focused on the case of Switzerland as it has low recognition as a wine producing country. Results show that Switzerland's products have a high quality image and this could be exploited in developing a generic campaign.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Vivien E. Jancenelle, Susan F. Storrud-Barnes, Anthony L Iaquinto and Dominic Buccieri

The purpose of this paper is to focus on investor reactions to unanticipated changes in income, and whether those reactions can be mitigated by managerial discussion. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on investor reactions to unanticipated changes in income, and whether those reactions can be mitigated by managerial discussion. The authors investigate how top-management team certainty and optimism during post-earnings announcement conference calls can serve as corrective actions and add back firm value in times of unexpected changes in firm-specific risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is tested empirically in the context of large, publicly traded, US firms’ quarterly earnings announcements, and their subsequent post-earnings announcement conference calls. The authors use the advanced content analysis software DICTION to measure the levels of managerial certainty and optimism displayed during post-earnings announcement conference calls, and event-study methodology to measure investors’ reactions.

Findings

Results indicate that earnings surprises are negatively associated with firm value, but that this relationship is mitigated positively by displays of managerial certainty and optimism during post-earnings announcement conference calls.

Originality/value

This work uses an innovative research design to study top-management team rhetoric in post-earnings announcement conference calls, and how specific discussions mitigate investors’ negative reactions to increases in firm-specific risk. The study highlights the importance of top-management team certainty and optimism for value creation in times of change in firm-specific risk, and the importance of rhetoric as a tool for corrective action.

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Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Isabella Chaney, Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Bang Nguyen and T.C. Melewar

This paper offers insights into the consumption motives and purchasing behaviour of that market segment in Taiwan against the background of increasing consumption of…

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14514

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers insights into the consumption motives and purchasing behaviour of that market segment in Taiwan against the background of increasing consumption of luxury fashion brands by young female consumers in Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of data collected using face-to-face semi-structured interviews with 23 fashion-conscious females aged 18-32 years was completed and new empirical insights are offered.

Findings

The study found a high level of involvement in the world of luxury fashion retailing. Asian consumers devoured media commentary, drew inspiration from female celebrities and treated information-seeking and discussion of luxury fashion brands with friends as a serious and enjoyable pursuit. The social status conferred by expensive fashion wear motivated them to spend on luxury brands even if their discretionary income was limited. Potential guilt in so doing was assuaged by rationalising that the quality was good and the purchase would be long lasting. Marketers targeting this valuable segment should communicate appeals to an aspirational lifestyle in traditional and social media, effective at reaching young women.

Originality/value

The study reported in this paper contributes to the limited published research into the luxury-marketing sector in Asia by examining the buying behaviour of female Strawberry Generation consumers in Taiwan. It is the first to research and investigate the meanings attached to luxury by these individuals in the collectivist culture of Taiwan, as well as their motivations, and the factors influencing their purchase of luxury fashions. The study thus contributes with new knowledge to the buying of luxury fashion products by young female Taiwanese consumers, which may be extended to other collectivist cultures in Asia.

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Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Kym Thorne and Alexander Kouzmin

Post 9/11 events not only exposed the visible and invisible aspects of the often intertwined self‐interest of political, economic and especially religious elites, but also…

Abstract

Purpose

Post 9/11 events not only exposed the visible and invisible aspects of the often intertwined self‐interest of political, economic and especially religious elites, but also presented a practical and ideological vacuum susceptible to “once and for all” opportunistic fantasies of ultra and Neo‐conservative, cum religious, fanatics. The purpose of this paper is to counter balance the constant flow of Neo‐liberal and religious‐fundamentalist propaganda that is having a destructive effect on hard‐won civil ideals and democratic freedoms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a study of the relationship between visible and invisible power in the context of a historical study of the great age of tolerance and co‐existence between Jews, Muslims and Christians. The paper uses Benvenisti's “double history” methodology to recover what is visible on the surface and the “buried history” of what is invisible to discern the implications the Spanish Convivencia has for contemporary debates over political and religious “purity”.

Findings

This paper discovers dangerous signs of a continuing ahistorical hubris amongst elites and others that denies the historical evidence for the possibility of mutual accommodations between political and religious communities. This paper locates the need to recover lost, or discounted, multiple histories and (in)visible portents of a future other than the triumphalism of Western, especially “exceptionalist” US interests.

Research limitations/implications

This paper demonstrates the need for more research into the use/misuse of historical evidence within (in)visible power mechanisms designed to serve ideological and hegemonic interests.

Originality/value

In our uncertain age, this paper is notable for developing a historically grounded vision of a real‐politic new world order based on mutual accommodation and respect.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Rouxelle De Villiers

This paper aims to situate tourism within the wider context of temporary and permanent people movements and immigration as a form of permanent tourism with a deep gaze…

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911

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to situate tourism within the wider context of temporary and permanent people movements and immigration as a form of permanent tourism with a deep gaze into tourists’ own national culture and even deeper gaze into the trappings of immigrants’ quotidian identity to define a modified identity. This paper offers, through auto-ethnography (AE) and confirmatory introspection (CI), a glimpse into the complex decision-making processes tourists, migrant workers and immigrants have to cope with to survive and thrive in a home “away” from their country of birth. The literature on the comparison between temporary mobility (tourism), nomadic migration (semi-permanent mobility) and permanent mobility (drifters, wanderers or denizen globe trotters) is sparse and unsystematic.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of AE and CI allows the researcher with several years of cognitive and affective information and easy access to data on the private, lived experiences of the author and closely related family. Having lived and worked in several countries, supplemented by experiences of visiting over 35 countries for varying periods, the researcher has direct access to a wealth of rich data related to tourism (one- to five-week trips to Europe, USA, South America, the Middle East, Africa, Australia and the Pacific Islands), semi-permanent mobility (one-year exchange work placement in North America) and permanent mobility (more than ten years of being immigrants to New Zealand).

Findings

The results show that tourists and immigrants are exposed to numerous decisions (varying in complexity and impact) before, during and after their travels that will impact on their acculturation, the genuineness of their experience and their willingness to modify their own identities, as well as the culture of the destinations they consume. Travelers have to overcome contextual and personal hurdles to achieve integration in a reasonable time. The way in which they tackle and overcome these hurdles will impact upon their modification of personal identity and acculturation.

Practical implications

This paper offers practical advice to tourists, immigrants and employers on becoming adaptable consumers, highly resilient survivors and highly reliable organizations – able to thrive in today’s global marketplace. This study helps marketers, tourism professionals and employers of migrants to understand the processes consumers go through to modify identity to effectively and timely fit into new environments.

Originality/value

AE- and CI-based research explores the tourist gaze and acculturation processes and discusses a two-directional model of modification of culture and identity. In addition, the paper highlights complex decision-making models tourists, nomads, globe trotters and immigrants use when considering alternative destinations and sought-after experiences.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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