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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Annelies E.M. Van Vianen, Irene E. De Pater, Myriam N. Bechtoldt and Arne Evers

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how climate strength and quality are related to employee commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions.

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1971

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how climate strength and quality are related to employee commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 48 work units in organizations from different branches of industry. A total of 419 employees completed a questionnaire.

Findings

Climate quality was related to commitment above and beyond individual climate perceptions. However, this concerned the climate dimensions of cooperation and innovation, but not reward. Climate strength moderated the relationship between individual cooperation and innovation perceptions, and commitment.

Research limitations/implications

This study emphasizes the importance of group‐level perceptions as related to employee commitment. Because of the cross‐sectional design, conclusions about the causal order of the variables cannot be drawn.

Practical implications

If organizations want to increase employees' commitment they should put the more skeptical employees in positive work environments, thus, in units of higher cooperation and innovation quality.

Social implications

People are sensitive to the evaluative tone of their social environment.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to examine the combined relationships of individual climate perceptions, climate‐strength, and climate quality with employee commitment.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Irene E. De Pater, Annelies E.M. Van Vianen, Agneta H. Fischer and Wendy P. Van Ginkel

The purpose of this paper is to examine: gender differences in the choice to perform challenging tasks, gender differences in the actual performance of challenging tasks…

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2644

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine: gender differences in the choice to perform challenging tasks, gender differences in the actual performance of challenging tasks, and the impact of challenging experiences on supervisors' evaluations of individuals' potential for career advancement.

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, a sample of 158 students participated in a laboratory study that examined gender differences in choosing to perform challenging tasks in a situation that stressed individual performance. In study 2, a sample of 93 interns completed questionnaires in which the authors measured their challenging job experiences. Interns' supervisors evaluated interns' potential for career advancement.

Findings

In an achievement situation, women chose to perform fewer challenging tasks than men (study 1). During their internships, females had fewer challenging job experiences than males (study 2). Having challenging experiences was positively related to supervisors' evaluations of interns' potential for career advancement (study 2).

Research limitations/implications

The use of student samples may be considered a limitation of these studies. However, the nature of the research questions justifies an initial examination among students. Moreover, small gender differences in experiences at the start of individuals' careers may ultimately lead to increasing discrepancies between men's and women's careers.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine individuals' own impact on the extent to which they experience job challenge. Moreover, it is the first that empirically examines the relationship between job challenge and evaluations of career potential.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Annelies E.M. van Vianen, Irene E. De Pater and Floor Van Dijk

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between work value PO fit with fit being operationalized as a same‐source or different‐source measure.

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4558

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between work value PO fit with fit being operationalized as a same‐source or different‐source measure.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 94 employees from a company located in Curac¸ao completed a questionnaire in which they rated their personal work values, their perceptions of the work values of the organization, and their turnover intention.

Findings

The different‐source work value fit measure was significantly and more strongly related to turnover intention than the same‐source work value fit measure.

Research limitations/implications

This study underscores the need for a careful reflection on the content and operationalization of fit measures.

Practical implications

Managers are able to manage the fit of their employees by creating positive group level perceptions of the work environment.

Originality/value

This study examines the effects of different fit measures on individuals' turnover intention. Moreover, work values fit was investigated.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Remus Ilies, Irene E. De Pater and Tim Judge

The paper aims to examine, first, how performance feedback influences positive and negative affect within individuals across negative and positive feedback range, and…

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5365

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine, first, how performance feedback influences positive and negative affect within individuals across negative and positive feedback range, and secondly, whether self‐esteem moderates individuals' affective reactions to feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 197 undergraduate students completed an 8‐trial experiment. For each trial, participants performed a task, received performance feedback, and were subsequently asked to report their affective state. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test the hypothesized within‐ individual effects and the cross‐level moderating role of self‐esteem.

Findings

Performance feedback did influence both positive and negative affect within individuals and feedback indicating goal non‐attainment (i.e. negative feedback) increased negative affect more than it reduced positive affect. The data offered some support for the prediction with respect to the moderating role of self‐esteem derived from self‐enhancement theory.

Research limitations / implications

The laboratory design and student sample are limitations with the study. However, the nature of our research question justifies an initial examination in a controlled, laboratory setting. Our findings may stimulate researchers to further investigate the role of affect and emotions in behavioral self‐regulation.

Originality/value

This study furthers research on reactions to feedback by examining the feedback‐affect process within individuals across time. Multiple dimensions of affect were considered and positive and negative feedback continua were examined separately.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Michael J. Morley

The purpose of the paper is to introduce the special issue that brings together six papers exploring aspects of person‐organization fit.

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18176

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to introduce the special issue that brings together six papers exploring aspects of person‐organization fit.

Design/methodology/approach

This overarching paper contextualizes the theme and introduces the selected papers.

Findings

The findings in this paper vary according to the core theme of each of the six contributions.

Originality/value

Combined the papers explore new avenues of enquiry in the person‐organization (P‐O) fit domain and showcase international theoretical and empirical work on the P‐O fit construct.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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