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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Ira Abdullah, Alisa G. Brink, C. Kevin Eller and Andrea Gouldman

We examine and compare current practices in teaching preparation in U.S. accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral programs.

Abstract

Purpose

We examine and compare current practices in teaching preparation in U.S. accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral programs.

Methodology/approach

We conduct an anonymous online survey of the pedagogical training practices experienced by Ph.D. students in accounting, finance, management, and economics programs in the United States.

Findings

Results indicate that accounting, finance, and management perform similarly with respect to providing doctoral students with first-hand teaching experience and requiring for-credit courses in teacher training. Accounting and management appear to utilize doctoral students as teaching assistants less than the other disciplines. A lower proportion of accounting doctoral students indicate that their program requires proof of English proficiency prior to teaching, and pedagogical mentoring is rare across disciplines. Accounting and management doctoral students feel more prepared to teach undergraduate courses compared to finance and economics students. However, all disciplines indicate a relative lack of perceived preparation to teach graduate courses.

Practical implications

This study provides empirical evidence of the current practices in pedagogical training of accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral students.

Social implications

The results highlight several areas where accounting could possibly improve with regard to pedagogical training in doctoral programs. In particular we suggest (1) changes in the teaching evaluation process, (2) development of teaching mentorships, (3) implementing a teaching portfolio requirement, and (4) incorporation of additional methods of assisting non-native English speakers for teaching duties.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the literature regarding the pedagogical training in accounting doctoral programs.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Mohammad Abdullah

This paper aims to compare and contrast the concept, mechanism and functions of the two socio-economic institutions, i.e. waqf (Islamic trust) and English trust. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare and contrast the concept, mechanism and functions of the two socio-economic institutions, i.e. waqf (Islamic trust) and English trust. It endeavours to juxtapose the salient features of waqf and trust with an objective to examine the nature of similarities and dissimilarities between the two institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies the socio-legal research methodology and uses qualitative paradigm to analyse the literature. The paper is based on a desk-based research.

Findings

This paper finds that there is nothing intrinsically rigid in the jurisprudential paradigm of waqf which might impinge upon either the efficiency or effectiveness of the waqf vis-à-vis trust. The main findings of the paper are encapsulated in underlining certain Shariah principles which essentially hold waqf from transforming into a trust-like secular institution.

Research limitations/implications

This paper compares the jurisprudential underpinnings and conceptual frameworks of waqf and trust, and it does not evaluate their efficiency or effectiveness in empirical terms. The underlying socio-economic efficiency and impacts of the two institutions can be examined empirically in separate comparative case studies.

Practical implications

This paper examines and critically analyses the different socio-economic implications that waqf and trust entail for the societies in which they function. This analysis is important for the policy recommendations towards protecting the religious identity of waqf while re-structuring its models.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is encapsulated in the critical analysis of how the paradigms of the two institutions, i.e. waqf and trust, which appear similar in form but differ in the substance, are shaped and governed.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Abstract

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Radicalisation and Counter-Radicalisation in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-005-5

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Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2019

Yahya Al-Abdullah and Rosemary Papa

This chapter’s focus is on the disparate factors that are affecting higher education students that by circumstance not of their making are both displaced and seeking…

Abstract

This chapter’s focus is on the disparate factors that are affecting higher education students that by circumstance not of their making are both displaced and seeking refuge within the fields of continuing their higher education. The fear of losing a young educated generation that can be part of the reconciliation process of the country in the post-conflict era has become close to reality, especially in Syria and in the neighbouring countries where the lost possibility of Syrian refugees’ returning to Syria is higher than other places. We have organized this chapter into three parts. The first part explores the history of higher education for Syrians with emphasis on the last half century. The second part describes the theoretical underpinnings of those displaced in today’s social political context through the lenses of Foucault and Maslow. The third part discusses a specific case study: the challenges Syrian students are facing in Lebanon, focusing on specific policies such as online education as a viable tool for serving displaced students, legal documents and the lack thereof, ability to get scholarships, policies and laws to understand.

Details

Education, Immigration and Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-044-4

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Alba Gonzalez Alvarez, Peter Ll. Evans, Lawrence Dovgalski and Ira Goldsmith

Chest wall reconstruction of large oncological defects following resection is challenging. Traditional management involves the use of different materials that surgeons…

Abstract

Purpose

Chest wall reconstruction of large oncological defects following resection is challenging. Traditional management involves the use of different materials that surgeons creatively shape intraoperatively to restore the excised anatomy. This is time-consuming, difficult to mould into shape and causes some complications such as dislocation or paradoxical movement. This study aims to present the development and clinical implantation of a novel custom-made three-dimensional (3D) laser melting titanium alloy implant that reconstructs a large chest wall resection and maintains the integrity of the thoracic cage.

Design/methodology/approach

The whole development process of the novel implant is described: design specifications, computed tomography (CT) scan manipulation, 3D computer-assisted design (CAD), rapid prototyping, final manufacture and clinical implantation. A multidisciplinary collaboration in between engineers and surgeons guided the iterative design process.

Findings

The implant provided excellent aesthetical and functional results. The virtual planning and production of the implant prior to surgery reduced surgery time and uncertainty. It also improved safety and accuracy. The implant sited nicely on the patient anatomy after resection following the virtual plan. At six months following implantation, there were no implant-related complications of pain, infection, dislocation or paradoxical movement. This technique offered a fast lead-time for implant production, which is crucial for oncological treatment.

Research limitations/implications

More cases and a long-term follow-up are needed to confirm and quantify the benefits of this procedure; further research is also required to design a solution that better mimics the chest wall biomechanics while preventing implant complications.

Originality/value

The authors present a novel custom thoracic implant that provided a satisfactory reconstruction of a large chest wall defect, developed and implanted within three weeks to address a fast-growing chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, the authors describe its development process in detail as a design guideline, discussing potential improvements and critical design considerations so that this study can be replicated for future cases.

Abstract

Details

Education, Immigration and Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-044-4

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Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2019

Abstract

Details

Education, Immigration and Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-044-4

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Catherine McGlynn and Shaun McDaid

Abstract

Details

Radicalisation and Counter-Radicalisation in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-005-5

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2015

Martin Gallagher

This chapter outlines the co-operative possibilities that may occur between terrorists and organised criminals. It focuses specifically on the decision making processes of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter outlines the co-operative possibilities that may occur between terrorists and organised criminals. It focuses specifically on the decision making processes of organised criminals, outlining the factors that affect any decision they may make that involves a move to assist those engaged in terrorism, the ‘initial nexus’. It accomplishes this with specific reference to the perceived entrepreneurial aspects of organised crime, using the work of Baumol specifically, but also expanding the scope of the criminal’s considerations of ‘profit’ beyond simply financial gain.

Methodology/approach

A literature review and potential model of the decision making processes of organised criminals working within an initial nexus relationship is presented, supported by a range of opinions.

Findings

We suggest a number of factors that affect organised criminals decision making process when co-operating with terrorists for profit. These factors include: the nuances of criminal cultures, the use of calculated deception, cultural affinity and geographical distance from spheres of operation.

Research limitations/implications

In the main the chapter presents the decision making processes of organised criminal income generation through those involved in academia and law enforcement. However, there is an acknowledgement of the need to gather the views of those involved in organised crime, and an outline of potential methods of research to achieve this.

Practical implications

It highlights this under-researched area to both academic and law enforcement professionals. Suggestions regarding potential areas of policy focus to interrupt initial nexus relationships are made.

Social implications

Provides an insight into this under-researched area, and may affect the perception of criminal decision making processes for academics, law enforcement professionals and the public at large.

Originality/value

The model presented is a means by which the potential for more accurate assessment of criminal action and associated risk calculation can be predicted.

Details

Exploring Criminal and Illegal Enterprise: New Perspectives on Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-551-8

Keywords

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