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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2019

Ioannis Manikas, Balan Sundarakani and Vera Iakimenko

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main reasons for spare parts logistics failures and address logistics distribution design in order to achieve the desired…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main reasons for spare parts logistics failures and address logistics distribution design in order to achieve the desired level of after-sales maintenance service.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on an empirical case study on a large corporation providing worldwide with retail banking hardware, software and services. The case study focuses on the automated teller machine (ATM) part of activities, with a focus on the spare parts distribution and after-sales service network in the Eastern Europe.

Findings

The proposed network solution of multiple distribution centers with short-cut distance saving approach will enable the case study company to redesign their spare part logistics architecture in order to achieve short response time. Research findings reveal possible spare parts delivery delays and thus the service-level agreement failures with clients in the case study company.

Research limitations/implications

This research covers a particular supply chain environment and identified research gaps. It discusses a time-based responsive logistics problem and develops a conceptual framework that would help researchers to better understand logistics challenges of installed equipment maintenance and after-sales service.

Originality/value

This case study research shows the “big picture” of spare parts logistics challenges as vital part of installed equipment after-sales and maintenance service network, as well as emphasizes how the unique context of a market like Russian Federation can set-up a distribution network efficiently. Strategies applied to handle such service-level failures, reverse logistics aspects of repairable and non-repairable spare parts to such large ATM after-sales service network based on this longitudinal case offer value for similar scale companies.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Keivan Zokaei, Ioannis Manikas and Hunter Lovins

This paperaims to review how the field of lean and green has been evolving. Authors draw parallels between the fields of sustainability and quality management. The paper’s…

Abstract

Purpose

This paperaims to review how the field of lean and green has been evolving. Authors draw parallels between the fields of sustainability and quality management. The paper’s title is borrowed and modified from Crosby’s seminal book: Quality is Free.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts with a review on how early lean researchers in the late 1980s draw upon benchmark studies, looking at Toyota versus other auto manufacturers to demonstrate that quality is free. Similarly, the authors carry out a benchmark to show how the same argument is valid about Toyota’s environmental performance and how Toyota’s concept of Monozukuri can be exploited as proof for the environment is free movement. The paper concludes with an attempt to address the gap between theory and practice in the field of lean and green.

Findings

The starting point for creating a lean and green business system is the understanding that there is no trade-off between lean and green, that lean and green should be brought together in a symbiosis, as Toyota have done with Monozukuri approach. This requires a coherent strategy that is well developed, and well deployed across all levels of business. The bottom line remains that environment is free, but it is not a gift.

Research limitations/implications

The findings presented in the paper are based on arguments resulted from the review of the relevant literature. It is important to obtain feedback from a large sample of businesses regarding lean and green symbiosis to arrive at sound and valid conclusions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the fields of operations management and sustainability by proposing a change in businesses’ mind-set about sustainability. Rather than seeing environmental protection as a cost, it should be regarded as an opportunity for enhancing economic performance. In doing so, we can seek inspiration from the fields of quality management and the total quality movement.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/00070700910957276. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/00070700910957276. When citing the article, please cite: Ioannis Manikas, Leon A. Terry, (2009), “A case study assessment of the operational performance of amultiple fresh produce distribution centre in the UK”, British Food Journal, Vol. 111 Iss 5 pp. 421 - 435.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2009

Ioannis Manikas and Leon A. Terry

The aim of this research is to evaluate the current operational status of fresh produce distribution centres in the UK and identify the nature and magnitude of the main…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to evaluate the current operational status of fresh produce distribution centres in the UK and identify the nature and magnitude of the main logistical problems within them.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical evaluation of space and time utilization efficiency has been achieved by studying on‐site operations in a multiple produce handling and short‐term storage facility in Kent, UK. The objective of this research was to measure operational performance of distribution centres for agricultural perishables in terms of through‐put and space utilization.

Findings

The inefficient utilization of storage space within cold rooms has been identified and quantified accurately, whilst the quality control task has been recognized as the most time‐consuming task and a critical cause for hindering product flow.

Practical implications

Despite their importance, distribution centres for fresh fruit and vegetables have received little attention in the distribution and performance management literature. Given the lack of robust performance measurement systems reported, the measurement of operational performance in distribution centres for agricultural products was a challenge.

Originality/value

The measurement and improvement of the operational performance in each linkage of the fresh produce supply chain – such as a distribution centre – can lead in achieving higher levels of service at substantially reduced costs. A small number of publications are found in the literature providing information on physical distribution of agricultural perishables, and how the key features of perishability and voluminosity of the produce affect the distribution efficiency. In this research, a step towards the improvement of the fresh produce distribution industry operational performance has been attempted, by evaluating the current operational status of a leading multiple produce distribution centre in the UK.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Basil Manos and Ioannis Manikas

In this paper, the key drivers and constraints for implementing traceability are examined in the Greek fresh produce supply chain. The main objective is to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the key drivers and constraints for implementing traceability are examined in the Greek fresh produce supply chain. The main objective is to identify the main factors affecting the implementation of traceability schemes, under the current supply chain structure and evaluate the theoretical framework identified in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A specific executive research was conducted, including interviews with key representatives of the sector. The scope of the research was to collect qualitative data with the aid of an unstructured questionnaire with no close‐ended questions. The research sample included 22 agricultural cooperatives and private packinghouses located in northern Greece where the core value adding activities of the fresh produce supply chain are taking place. Northern Greece is of high importance for the examined sector as a high percentage of all value adding activities, from production to distribution, are taking place within this region.

Findings

In the fresh produce supply chains ephemeral dynamic collaborations prevail which do not allow particular transparency with regard to the exchange of information between their members. Severe inequities recognized between supply chain members regarding their ability to imply traceability systems effectively, their current technological and operational status and the availability to undertake the cost of investment in such systems. Tight profit margins and inadequate knowledge on potential benefits of traceability systems are reported as some of the main factors that hinder investments on sophisticated traceability schemes. Adequate labeling automation with the implementation of machine‐readable labeling technologies and the introduction of web‐based technologies as a low cost solution are estimated to improve fresh produce traceability and logistics efficiency.

Originality/value

Within a limited number of research papers on fresh produce traceability, there is no reference to the Greek produce sector. Thus, this paper progresses knowledge of the Greek produce industry regarding perspectives and key drivers for traceability implementation, supported by the thorough review of the literature.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Dimitris Folinas, Ioannis Manikas and Basil Manos

The main objectives of the paper are to identify the needs in data that are considered as fundamental for the efficient food traceability and to introduce a generic…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objectives of the paper are to identify the needs in data that are considered as fundamental for the efficient food traceability and to introduce a generic framework (architecture) of traceability data management that will act as guideline for all entities/food business operators involved.

Design/methodology/approach

The traceability system introduced is based on the implementation of XML (eXtensible Markup Language) technology. In the first stage, the necessary traceability data are identified and categorized. In the second stage, the selected data are transformed and inserted into a five‐element generic framework/model, using PML (Physical Markup Language), which is a standard technology of XML.

Findings

The assessment of information communication and diffusion underlines that the particular model is simple in use and user‐friendly, by enabling information flow through conventional technologies.

Practical implications

The main feature of this framework is the simplicity in use and the ability of communicating information through commonly accessible means such as the internet, e‐mail, and cell phones. This makes it particularly easy to use, even when it comes to the base of the supply chains (farmers, fishermen, cattle breeders, etc).

Originality/value

An integrated traceability system must be able to file and communicate information regarding product quality and origin, and consumer safety. The main features of such a system include adequate “filtering” of information, information extracting, from already existed databases, harmonization with international codification standards, internet standards and up to date technologies. The framework presented in this paper fulfills all the above features.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Ioanna Ferra

Abstract

Details

Digital Media and the Greek Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-328-9

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