Search results

1 – 10 of 400
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Kathy Langlois

Many First Nations and Inuit communities in Canada confront historical, cultural, socioeconomic and geographic barriers that have a profound impact on mental wellness. In…

Downloads
195

Abstract

Many First Nations and Inuit communities in Canada confront historical, cultural, socioeconomic and geographic barriers that have a profound impact on mental wellness. In 2006, a Senate Committee reported on mental health, mental illness and addiction. A key result has been the creation of the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC). Around the same time, Health Canada established a Mental Wellness Advisory Committee (MWAC) in collaboration with the representative bodies of Canada's First Nations and Inuit ‐ the Assembly of First Nations and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami ‐ to develop a strategic action plan to improve mental wellness outcomes of First Nations and Inuit. A participatory, inclusive and consensus‐based approach to the MWAC work has been key to the successful development of the strategic action plan and has brought credence and legitimacy to the process. MWAC, the strategic action plan and the ready linkages with the MHCC are important guides for moving forwards to improve the mental wellness outcomes of Canada's First Nations and Inuit.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2012

Patricia Gaviria

The Nunavut Land Claims Agreement (NLCA) between the Inuit in the Nunavut Settlement Area (formerly part of the Northwest Territories) and the Crown of Canada, led to the…

Abstract

The Nunavut Land Claims Agreement (NLCA) between the Inuit in the Nunavut Settlement Area (formerly part of the Northwest Territories) and the Crown of Canada, led to the creation of Nunavut in 1999. A public government in the Inuit homeland, Nunavut has the responsibility to put into effect the Inuit rights and benefits set out in the NLCA as well as provide a wide range of services tailored to the needs of all Nunavummiut of which 85% are Inuit. With a vast and largely untapped mineral, oil, and gas potential, Nunavut is now preparing to a private sector market economy open to global investors in natural resource exploration and exploitation. Certainly, Nunavut is a place where economic development and indigenous rights intersect crosscutting global, national, and territorial boundaries. This chapter looks at how indigenous peoples rights and the imperatives of a globalized/globalizing economy, are projected into and taken up by Nunavut Arctic College, Nunavut's sole postsecondary education institution. Integrating textual and contextual instances of analysis, this chapter highlights how the College translates seemingly conflicting policy messages, into all-encompassing education practices that weave into the omnipresent right to indigenous self-determination.

Details

Community Colleges Worldwide: Investigating the Global Phenomenon
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-230-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Nicole Gombay

The purpose of this paper is to show that, until the 1960s, subsistence hunting, fishing, and gathering were the mainstay of the economy for Inuit in the Eastern Canadian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that, until the 1960s, subsistence hunting, fishing, and gathering were the mainstay of the economy for Inuit in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. This economy was sustained by the moral imperative that food should be shared with others whenever possible. The article explores the experience of one man in Nunavik (Northern Québec) who has started a business selling food.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows that regulatory challenges facing the industry are considered in relation to the moral dilemmas that need to be confronted in moving from an economy based on sharing food to an economy predicated on market exchange.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a discussion about how this businessman has come to terms with his breaking of social norms about the sharing of food and his understanding of how, in doing so, he is representative of a new economic order amongst Inuit in Nunavik.

Originality/value

The paper shows that this is an original and novel subject for study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Aldene H. Meis Mason, Robert B. Anderson and Leo‐Paul Dana

This case study aims to explore the affect of Canadian Inuit culture on recognizing opportunities from caribou when participating in the bio economy and decision making…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to explore the affect of Canadian Inuit culture on recognizing opportunities from caribou when participating in the bio economy and decision making and benefit sharing considerations for Inuit partnerships arsing from the northern bioeconomy.

Design/methodology/approach

This Inuit case study in northern Canada combined Elder interviews, a focus group and product elicitation techniques. First, the Inuit identified traditional uses of caribou for health care. Second, they explored its potential uses for biomedicines, nutraceuticals and functional foods. Third, they discussed partnerships for development and benefits that should result.

Findings

Inuit had the right to develop and sell caribou products. Decisions about products and processes should be up to the community. Ensuring food security was critical. They preferred partnering with Inuit and northern businesses and government. University and business partnerships needed to provide ongoing monetary and non‐monetary benefits such as employment, new skills and knowledge, and networks.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions based on one case study need to be confirmed by surveying other Inuit communities. Future research should also include Inuit youth.

Practical implications

This research provides an increased understanding of the commons, the use of traditional resources, food security and the interaction of Indigenous culture on opportunity recognition for policy makers, businesses, indigenous communities, and university researchers.

Originality/value

This research paper integrates commons, indigenous entrepreneurship, opportunity recognition and bioeconomy. Furthermore, it provides the Inuit with a voice which they feel has been lacking in the business literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Connecting Values to Action: Non-Corporeal Actants and Choice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-308-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Lisa-Jo K. van den Scott

Rational time accompanies the onslaught of hyper-globalization. The Inuit of Arviat, Nunavut, paradoxically use rational time to resist rational time, setting aside…

Abstract

Rational time accompanies the onslaught of hyper-globalization. The Inuit of Arviat, Nunavut, paradoxically use rational time to resist rational time, setting aside temporal zones to protect Western cultural paradigms from impinging on their lives all of the time. Additionally, because temporal norms indicate membership in a group, doing time differently is one of the most effective ways in which to say “I’m not a part of your group!” While resisting rational clock-time, for example by walking off the job each day promptly at 4:59 pm, the Inuit of Arviat nevertheless have a myriad of clocks in their homes. This chapter explores their temporal resistance and the riddle of “why so many clocks in Arviat?”

Details

Oppression and Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-167-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Gisele M. Arruda and Sebastian Krutkowski

This paper aims to place a discussion of traditional knowledge and the indigenous voice within the framework of Arctic governance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to place a discussion of traditional knowledge and the indigenous voice within the framework of Arctic governance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves literature review spanning different disciplines and highlighting important case studies.

Findings

The advance of low-cost, portable technology has brought about tremendous opportunities for indigenous people. Knowledge and observation are no longer monopolised by scholars, filmmakers or politicians based in the West. Film has proved to be a powerful tool for cultural preservation while the internet (video sharing sites and social media platforms in particular) have empowered local communities and facilitated their involvement in political activism and local governance. New ways to represent themselves have been a crucial step forward, yet the new goal is to work towards greater recognition of the “indigenous voice” and ensure traditional knowledge is not treated as anecdotal and irrelevant in managing Arctic affairs..

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions reached in the discussion need to be further explored by extending the research into Inuit communities to survey how technology can facilitate and impact collaborative forms of governance in the Arctic.

Practical implications

This research provides an increased understanding of how technology transforms power relations. Policymakers can see that the indigenous community in the Arctic is not lodged in the past. Their increased use of new technology can serve as an effective oversight of political decisions and economic initiatives, particularly those relating to oil and gas exploration in the region.

Social implications

Indigenous views and knowledge are literally crossing borders through media. Initially perceived as a cultural threat, film, video and internet are now regarded as powerful technology tools for cultural preservation and empowerment of local communities. In other words, the modern communication patterns are a crucial mean of indigenous population take part of the current global debate, express their concerns, reinforce their values and traditions and have an active voice in the globalised world.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates how technology helps indigenous communities to address different economic, environmental, cultural, educational, research and other issues in the Arctic. Robust evidence is presented to support the call for traditional knowledge to become an integral part of decision-making processes across all institutions of governance in the Arctic.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Mark C. Goniwiecha and David A. Hales

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations…

Abstract

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations ago, are rediscovering their roots and are enrolling in foreign language classes, taking up folk dancing, learning ethnic cuisine, tracing their genealogical pedigrees, and returning to the religious traditions their parents may or may not have passed on to them. Now it's “in” to be ethnic.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Jeffrey van den Scott

Howard Becker’s theory for the sociology of art (including music) revolves around the simple, and often overlooked fact, “All artistic work, like all human activity…

Abstract

Howard Becker’s theory for the sociology of art (including music) revolves around the simple, and often overlooked fact, “All artistic work, like all human activity, involves the joint activity of a number, often a large number, of people.” Among Becker’s writing about music, he presents an idea that I find is still relevant today, namely, that sociological and ethnomusicological work seem to be two hands of a single body that have little idea of what each other are doing. Drawing on the work of scholars such as Becker and Kay Kaufman Shelemay, I propose a model for the construction of the music event that highlights the relationship among the many systems behind the musical experience. I provide a case study of Inuit throat singing to demonstrate the effectiveness of this model in trying to explore the relationships among music, culture, and society.

Details

Revisiting Symbolic Interaction in Music Studies and New Interpretive Works
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-838-9

Keywords

1 – 10 of 400