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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Lukas Zenk, Nicole Hynek, Noella Edelmann, Shefali Virkar, Peter Parycek and Gerald Steiner

Intraorganizational knowledge and information sharing are important steps toward more-accessible organizational knowledge. The aim of this study is to qualitatively…

Abstract

Purpose

Intraorganizational knowledge and information sharing are important steps toward more-accessible organizational knowledge. The aim of this study is to qualitatively explore factors that contribute to employees' motivations for sustaining intraorganizational knowledge-sharing behaviors and to examine the impact of these factors in a quantitative study with the Austrian Federal Ministry of Defense. This ministry faces a retirement wave in the next 5–10 years. Intraorganizational knowledge sharing before, during, and following this wave will play a decisive role for the organization in the near future.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory sequential mixed-methods study was conducted. The study design involved a qualitative study phase with expert interviews and stakeholder workshops (n = 9) and a quantitative study phase based on a cross-sectional online survey with an implicit association test on intraorganizational knowledge sharing (n = 59).

Findings

In the qualitative study phase, three main research topics regarding intraorganizational knowledge sharing were identified: employee attitude, organizational support, and specific relational aspects of knowledge transfer, such as reciprocal relationships among employees and opportunities for knowledge exchange. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived organizational support was the only factor that was a significant predictor of motivation for engaging in knowledge sharing. We also analyzed the data for moderation effects and demonstrated that sociopsychological factors (e.g., the engagement or openness of colleagues to share their knowledge) further strengthened the positive relationship between employees' perceived support and personal willingness to share knowledge.

Practical implications

We conclude that an organizational culture that supports knowledge sharing within the organization is highly relevant for motivating employees to share their knowledge. Practitioners will also benefit from the insights of the various dimensions of employees' willingness to engage in knowledge-sharing behaviors to better design further interventions in organizations.

Originality/value

In accordance with an exploratory sequential mixed-methods approach, we followed a transdisciplinary process in which scientific and practical experiences and knowledge were integrated. For this purpose, interviews and workshops with experts and stakeholders in the organization were conducted. The qualitative findings were incorporated into a quantitative survey and an implicit association test for the employees of the organization. This approach demonstrates a different and more holistic approach to analyzing a real-world problem in the context of a governmental agency in order to investigate the multidimensional and complex topic of intraorganizational knowledge sharing.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Zachary Williams, Jason E. Lueg and Stephen A. LeMay

Supply chain security (SCS), as a component of an organization's overall supply chain risk management strategy, has become a critical factor for businesses and government…

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5595

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain security (SCS), as a component of an organization's overall supply chain risk management strategy, has become a critical factor for businesses and government agencies since September 11, 2001, yet little empirical research supports policy or practice for the field. Therefore, this paper develops and presents a categorization of SCS based on existing research. This categorization of supply chain literature can help academics and practitioners to better understand SCS and also helps to identify a research agenda. Setting a research agenda for SCS will help academic and practitioner research focus on critical issues surrounding SCS.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers thoroughly reviewed the literature on SCS, including academic publications, white papers, and practitioner periodicals. The literature was then categorized according to the approach to SCS and the practical implications of this categorization are presented. In addition, this categorization was used to identify research gaps.

Findings

This analysis found that SCS needs more attention from the academic community. Like earlier assessments of this literature, this analysis found it to be mainly normative, with little research based on primary data. This paper categorizes the literature into four approaches to SCS: intraorganizational, interorganizational, a combination of intraorganizational and interorganizational, and ignore. This study develops a focused agenda for future, primary, empirical research on SCS.

Research limitations/implications

The sources of data for this literature review are secondary. The review sets a research agenda and calls for future empirical testing.

Practical implications

Practitioners will benefit from the framework presented here by better understanding approaches to SCS. This comprehensive review discusses the characteristics of SCS in great depth. As other researchers follow the research agenda, practitioners will benefit from the empirical findings and theory building.

Originality/value

This paper summarizes the literature on SCS to date, a topic that has grown in importance, yet received little attention from academics. This is the first comprehensive literature review of SCS. It includes a categorization of four possible approaches to SCS. It also distinguishes SCS from supply chain risk, while also recognizing their relationship. It identifies key issues in SCS research and calls for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Jessica Katz Jameson

This paper presents the theoretical rationale for further development of a model for the assessment and management of intraorganizational conflict. The purpose of such a…

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1921

Abstract

This paper presents the theoretical rationale for further development of a model for the assessment and management of intraorganizational conflict. The purpose of such a model would be to assist employees, managers, human resources practitioners, and external service providers in selecting the most appropriate conflict management strategy for a given conflict. The framework presented builds on the previous work of Sheppard (1984) and Elangovan (1995, 1998) in suggesting that a contingency‐based model of strategy selection must include attention to characteristics of the conflict, desired outcomes of the participants, and awareness of available conflict management strategies. By expanding the range of conflicts and conflict management strategies typically included within a single model, the framework presented here forms the basis of a comprehensive model for dealing with intraorganizational conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Robert D. Evans

The purpose of this viewpoint article is to demonstrate that firms can utilize intraorganizational resources to aid in helping older workers become technologically…

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730

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this viewpoint article is to demonstrate that firms can utilize intraorganizational resources to aid in helping older workers become technologically competent. Through the use of these intraorganizational resources, firms can benefit from the transfer of technological knowledge between younger and older workers. A further benefit is cost savings associated with utilization of internal as opposed to external resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a viewpoint article which demonstrates and raises awareness of some elementary internal resources which can aid in the development of older workers’ technological competence.

Findings

There exists a marked difference between younger and older workers and the associated technological competence of each. Implementing a mentoring process which matches recent college graduates or younger workers, digital natives, with older workers, digital immigrants, who are either returning to the workforce or transitioning to jobs which require technological skills, can aid in knowledge transfer of proprietary and public software programs and has the potential to lead to improved employee relationships.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the development and utilization of internal as opposed to external resources in aiding older workers gaining technological competence. These workers may be returning to the workforce or transitioning to jobs which require more technological knowledge, and, by providing a system to support this transition, both, firms and employees can benefit.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Wei Zhao and Xueguang Zhou

This study aims to investigate how various aspects of intraorganizational career advancement – current career attainments, recent pace of upward mobility, and future…

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2775

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how various aspects of intraorganizational career advancement – current career attainments, recent pace of upward mobility, and future prospect of career advancement – affect voluntary turnover, drawing empirical evidence from a multinational corporation (MNC) in Taiwan's cultural and labor market environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study was based on statistical analyses of personnel records of 303 employees in a multinational bank in Taiwan. A discrete‐time logistic model was used to analyse voluntary turnover events.

Findings

Results showed that salary increase and job status generally reduced voluntary turnover. A ceiling position on the job ladder induced turnover and also moderated the relationship between corporate title duration and turnover and that between age and turnover.

Research limitations/implications

Because the empirical evidence was based on data collected from one MNC in Taiwan's distinct research context, this may limit the generalizability of some findings in the study.

Originality/value

Whereas much of the literature on turnover has focused on psychological models, this study adopts an objective career perspective and highlights the significance of intraorganizational career advancement in affecting voluntary turnover. It also deepens one's understanding of career development and choices in a Chinese cultural environment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2015

This chapter develops the theoretical framework used to inform the study, which is based largely on neoinstitutional theory. This monograph recognizes that a holistic…

Abstract

This chapter develops the theoretical framework used to inform the study, which is based largely on neoinstitutional theory. This monograph recognizes that a holistic perspective and richer insights are needed when examining complex issues associated with the adoption of internationally acceptable practices. The proposed theoretical framework incorporates international influences, domestic influences, and intraorganizational dynamics. In the context of globalization, China’s convergence with internationally acceptable principles and standards is largely shaped by international forces, including supranational organizations, foreign investors, and international accounting firms. Furthermore, in order to examine the operation of those imported ideas, it is essential to consider China’s contextual setting, which comprises the political system, economic system, legal system, social and cultural system, and accounting infrastructure. In addition, the convergence process is also influenced by interaction among organizational players who may actively mobilize their power to preserve the status quo and protect their power and interests. The outcome and the process of loose coupling deeply intertwine with and reflect upon international influences, domestic influences, and intraorganizational dynamics.

Details

Adoption of Anglo-American Models of Corporate Governance and Financial Reporting in China
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-898-3

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2006

Jitendra V. Singh

One area in which strategy and organizational ecology converge is organizational change. This essay weaves together salient themes in my (and my co-authors’) various…

Abstract

One area in which strategy and organizational ecology converge is organizational change. This essay weaves together salient themes in my (and my co-authors’) various writings on organizational change, and is anchored in the research literature of the last twenty years. Among other ideas developed here, I point out that there is now a convergence of agendas in strategy and ecology, with an important role being played by intraorganizational ecology. I develop the distinction between strong and weak selection approaches to organizational ecology. While the strong selection view does not find empirical support, there is stronger support for the weak selection view. I lay out some key features of an emerging evolutionary synthesis for the study of strategy and organization, and develop an evolutionary approach to organizational change.

Details

Ecology and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-435-5

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Lærke Højgaard Christiansen and Michael Lounsbury

How do organizations manage multiple logics in response to institutional complexity? In this paper, we explore how intraorganizational problems related to multiple logics…

Abstract

How do organizations manage multiple logics in response to institutional complexity? In this paper, we explore how intraorganizational problems related to multiple logics may be addressed via the mechanism of institutional bricolage – where actors inside an organization act as “bricoleurs” to creatively combine elements from different logics into newly designed artifacts. An illustrative case study of a global brewery group’s development of such an artifact – a Responsible Drinking Guide Book – is outlined. We argue that intraorganizational institutional bricolage first requires the problematization of organizational identity followed by a social process involving efforts to renegotiate the organization’s identity in relation to the logics being integrated. We show that in response to growing pressures to be more “responsible,” a group of organizational actors creatively tinkered with and combined elements from social responsibility and market logics by drawing upon extant organizational resources from different times and spaces in an effort to reconstitute their collective organizational identity.

Details

Institutional Logics in Action, Part B
Type: Book
ISBN:

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Osama Al‐Kwifi and Zafar U. Ahmed

The purpose of this study is to introduce a conceptual framework for knowledge transfer between Chinese firms and universities around the world, based on a joint learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to introduce a conceptual framework for knowledge transfer between Chinese firms and universities around the world, based on a joint learning process. The transfer of knowledge is important to increase the innovative capabilities of Chinese firms by accessing more sources of new knowledge not available locally.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is derived from the resource‐based perspective. Its main characteristics are defined, and the required stages are explained. The framework stresses the dynamic relationship among all stages, and the active interaction between interorganizational and intraorganizational learning processes.

Findings

Having a suitable process for selecting a partner is the pre‐condition for achieving effective knowledge transfer between university and firm, because it determines similar capabilities and how both partners can enhance the requirements of each other. In addition, the joint learning experience between university and firm will be rewarding to a large extent if high transparency, collaborative intent, informal communication and organizational commitment are adopted as the basis for joint learning.

Research limitations/implications

The study proposes a conceptual framework for knowledge transfer between Chinese firms and universities around the world, based on previous research in this domain. An empirical study will be beneficial to support this framework and to suggest needed modifications.

Originality/value

The study provides a greater understanding of the importance of a joint learning process between university and firm to support the innovative capacity of a firm. It emphasizes that the successful collaboration with a university can make a firm function as an external R&D hub.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Minna Logemann and Rebecca Piekkari

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to previous research on intraorganizational power in multinational corporations (MNCs). It shows that a subsidiary manager may…

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2589

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to previous research on intraorganizational power in multinational corporations (MNCs). It shows that a subsidiary manager may use language and acts of translation to resist control from headquarters and to (re)define his and his unit’s power position in a headquarters-subsidiary relationship. It also uncovers the interplay between natural languages and “company speak” as a specialized language.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a single case study of a European MNC undergoing strategic change. The data were drawn from company documents, personal interviews and focus group discussions.

Findings

The findings show that actors at both headquarters and in the focal subsidiary employed language and translation to exercise power over meanings; headquarters exerted control over “mindsets” and practices, while subsidiaries responded by resisting these meaning systems. The authors argue that the crossing of language boundaries offers a window onto shifting power positions and micro-politics in the MNC.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to a single translation act in a focal headquarters-subsidiary relationship.

Practical implications

From the managerial perspective, any process of communication in a multilingual context needs to be sensitive to power (re)definitions associated with language and translation.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on translation as a political act and hidden activity in the MNC.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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