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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

A.R. Elangovan

Although different facets of managerial third‐party intervention in organizations have been explored, we know little about how managers should intervene in different…

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1101

Abstract

Although different facets of managerial third‐party intervention in organizations have been explored, we know little about how managers should intervene in different disputes for resolving them successfully. In this study, a prescriptive model of intervention strategy selection proposed by Elangovan (1995) is tested. Data on successful and unsuccessful interventions were collected from senior managers in different organizations. The results show that following the prescriptions of the model leads to a significant increase in the likelihood that an intervention would be successful as well as in the degree of success of the intervention, thereby supporting a contingency view of dispute intervention.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2011

Hye‐Jin Paek, Beom Jun Bae, Thomas Hove and Hyunjae Yu

This study aims to examine the extent to which anti‐smoking websites use intervention strategies that have been informed by four prominent theories of health‐related…

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3779

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the extent to which anti‐smoking websites use intervention strategies that have been informed by four prominent theories of health‐related behavior change: the health belief model, the theory of reasoned action/theory of planned behavior, the transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis was applied to 67 unique and independent anti‐smoking websites to determine their use of 20 intervention strategies based on the four theories.

Findings

The findings reveal that anti‐smoking websites used the health belief model the most and social cognitive theory the least. In addition, websites devoted to smoking cessation used these theories more extensively than websites devoted to smoking prevention.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is somewhat small, which may result in lack of sufficient statistical power. Also, the analysis may have overlooked some important intervention strategies that are particularly effective for smoking intervention programs.

Practical implications

Anti‐smoking website designers should take more advantage of the internet as a health promotion medium and use more intervention strategies that have been informed by scientifically tested theories of behavior change, particularly with respect to affective and behavioral strategies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to current knowledge about which kinds of anti‐smoking messages are available online and how extensively they employ theory‐based intervention strategies.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Teresa Joyce Covin

Reports results from an extensive survey of major American changeprogrammes which revealed a set of clusters of interventions. Mosttypically, the change programmes…

Abstract

Reports results from an extensive survey of major American change programmes which revealed a set of clusters of interventions. Most typically, the change programmes involved combinations of intervention techniques. Team‐building, strategic planning, skill building and restructuring were the most common interventions. Success, however, appeared to depend on complex interactions amongst individual, organizational and change process variables.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Kirt Hainzer, Talitha Best and Philip Hugh Brown

The purpose of this paper twofold: first, to review the current state of knowledge regarding local value chain (LVC) interventions in the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper twofold: first, to review the current state of knowledge regarding local value chain (LVC) interventions in the context of international agricultural research and development; and, secondly, by synthesising the empirical findings from LVC projects, to provide guidance for future research and intervention design.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises systematic review and qualitative meta-synthesis guidelines to review and synthesise recent research papers and case studies dealing specifically with the development of LVCs, authored by professionals affiliated with development agencies and international research consortiums.

Findings

The paper identifies a novel two-phase characterisation of LVC interventions. Phase 1 identifies opportunities for interventions, which are characterised as typologies and presented upon a spectrum of value chain functionality from underdeveloped to mature. Phase 2 is the selection and implementation of strategies to achieve the identified opportunities from Phase 1, and the paper characterises these strategies per the domain of value chain functionality which they target.

Research limitations/implications

The interaction between context, socio-economic constraints and intervention strategies is still a poorly understood feature of value chain interventions, and the paper posits that a greater understanding of these interactions is crucial to the success of value chain interventions.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first synthesis of LVC interventions, while outlining research priorities and knowledge gaps required to design interventions which are consummate to the context and functionality of a prioritised chain.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2007

M. Kamil Kozan, Canan Ergin and Demet Varoglu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate strategies used by managers when intervening in subordinates' conflicts and the factors affecting choice of strategy in Turkish…

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2426

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate strategies used by managers when intervening in subordinates' conflicts and the factors affecting choice of strategy in Turkish organizations, where heavy emphasis is placed on intermediaries in managing conflicts.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a questionnaire from 392 employees of a convenience sample of 59 organizations, most of which were located in Ankara.

Findings

Factor analysis results showed that managers utilize as many as five strategies: mediation, inquisitorial (similar to arbitration), motivational tactics, conflict reduction through restructuring, and educating the parties. The conditions under which these strategies are used were analyzed by regression. Harmony emphasis in the organization led to increased use of mediation. However, harmony emphasis, when coupled with a low degree of delegation of authority to subordinates, resulted in increased use of the inquisitorial strategy. Harmony emphasis, when combined with substantive (as opposed to personal) conflicts and with high impact conflicts led to educating the subordinates. Motivational tactics were used more when the conflict had high impact at the workplace and had escalated or threatened to get out of control.

Research limitations/implications

Readers are cautioned on possible common factor bias; relations between variables may have emerged as a result of the data being reported by the same respondent.

Originality/value

The findings have research implications for future studies and for training of managers for conflict intervention in collectivistic cultures.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2012

Stacey Jones Bock and Christy Borders

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) present unique challenges to the families and educators supporting them. Even though families and educators report…

Abstract

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) present unique challenges to the families and educators supporting them. Even though families and educators report that behavioral issues can be identified by age 3 (Walker, Ramsey, & Gresham, 2004), the commonly used wait-and-see approach to intervening results in children with E/BD not receiving services until after the age of 10 (Park & Scott, 2009). By this time, behaviors have become chronic (Lewis, Jones, Horner, & Sugai, 2010) and educators primarily focus interventions on the child's social skills and behavioral deficits while there is a lack of focus on the student's academic needs (Lane, 2007). The purpose of this chapter is to review trends in E/BD research and practice that specifically focus on social emotional and academic interventions. While there is a strong history and direction for behavioral interventions for students with E/BD, researchers have only begun to investigate the academic learning needs of this population of students. The documented deficits in reading, writing, and mathematics for students with E/BD make it clear that further research is needed in these areas. The use of strategies including self-mediated, group/peer-mediated interventions, and explicit instruction may be effective teaching strategies across content areas. Initial studies show not only improved academic outcomes but also increases in positive behavior. The need for teachers and researchers to focus on the whole child, both the social emotional needs and the academic deficits, is imperative in order to improve the lives of children with E/BD.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

A.R. Elangovan

Although research on managerial third‐party dispute intervention has made considerable progress during the past two decades, an implicit assumption of rationality has…

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2355

Abstract

Although research on managerial third‐party dispute intervention has made considerable progress during the past two decades, an implicit assumption of rationality has permeated the conceptualizing and modeling of such behaviours. This paper explores the role of cognitive biases and heuristics in managerial intervention, and draws out the implications for outcome selection and third party behaviours.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Peter T. Coleman

Disputant “ripeness” is a state and a process of critical importance to the resolution of seemingly intractable conflict. Fostering ripeness is often a primary goal of…

Abstract

Disputant “ripeness” is a state and a process of critical importance to the resolution of seemingly intractable conflict. Fostering ripeness is often a primary goal of those who attempt to intervene. This study presents a typology of interventions for promoting ripeness in highly escalated, protracted conflicts, and investigates the distinct effects of four different types of intervention strategies on the commitment of disputants to make peace. The model defines a state of ripeness at the individual psychological level as a high level of commitment by a party to change the direction of the normative escalatory processes of the relations towards deescalation. Lewin's “drive” and “resistance” change‐force strategies are combined with “process” and “outcome” oriented interventions to yield the four strategies. Results indicated that process‐oriented interventions targeted at removing resistance obstacles to peace were more effective at fostering ripeness than outcome‐oriented interventions aimed at driving constructive change. The implications of the findings are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Avril Blamey, Jacki Gordon, Kim Newstead and Jacqueline McDowell

The purpose of this paper is to present learning on the strategies used by cooking skills practitioners and the programme theories, behaviour change mechanisms/contexts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present learning on the strategies used by cooking skills practitioners and the programme theories, behaviour change mechanisms/contexts and intended outcomes associated with these in varied contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Grey literature from Scottish cooking skills courses were reviewed using realist principles. Intervention implementation variables were identified and iteratively coded to uncover intended intervention strategies and programme theories. The lack of robust evaluation processes and outcome data in the grey literature prevented the testing of intended programme theories against outcomes. Alternatively, implementation strategies were aligned against behavioural-theory constructs contained in national guidance. Prioritised theories were further clarified/refined using practitioner and participant focus group data. Learning was used to inform future practice/evaluation.

Findings

Courses targeted and reached vulnerable individuals. Practitioners articulated multiple theories and assumptions about how strategies may work. Numerous strategies and behaviour constructs were used to target, tailor and reinforce cooking/food and wider social outcomes. Mechanisms were assumed to be triggered by different contexts and lead to varied outcomes. Strategies used were consistent with evidenced behaviour change constructs and guidelines. Interventions aimed to achieve non-cooking/social outcomes as well as cooking ones – including potential mediators of cooking behaviour, e.g. self-confidence. Contexts facilitated/limited the use of certain strategies. Limitations in course design, reporting and self-evaluation need to be addressed.

Practical implications

Recommendations for improving intervention commissioning, design and evaluation using realist principles are provided.

Originality/value

Learning addresses gaps in knowledge about the implementation of cooking skills interventions identified from systematic reviews and can improve course design and evaluation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Ling-Ling Tsao and Juhee Sung

The intention is to introduce the conceptual framework proposed by Brown, Odom, and Conroy (2001) for the implementation of social interaction intervention. This tiered…

Abstract

The intention is to introduce the conceptual framework proposed by Brown, Odom, and Conroy (2001) for the implementation of social interaction intervention. This tiered system organizes intervention strategies for early childhood professionals to make informed decision on how to promote social interactions of young children who are at risk for social competence difficulties in inclusive early childhood programs.

Details

Early Childhood and Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-459-6

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