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Article

Thomas C. Head and Peter F. Sorensen

Examines the impact of cultural values on the effectiveness and useof 19 organization development interventions. Uses a qualitative, expertconsensus methodology to collect…

Abstract

Examines the impact of cultural values on the effectiveness and use of 19 organization development interventions. Uses a qualitative, expert consensus methodology to collect data from seven culturally diverse countries: Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Bangladesh, Denmark, the People′s Republic of China, Venezuela, and Japan. Results support the hypothesis that the more congruent a culture is with the values of organization development, the more interventions will have both greater use and effectiveness. Suggests that specific cultural values, i.e. masculine/feminine, appear to be closely linked to specific interventions′ effectiveness.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article

Lyne M.G. Blanchette, Vivian M. van de Gaar, Hein Raat, Jeff French and Wilma Jansen

This paper aims to present a description of the development and implementation of a combined school- and community-based intervention for the prevention of overweight…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a description of the development and implementation of a combined school- and community-based intervention for the prevention of overweight among children, using the combined methods of social marketing (SMk) and intervention mapping (IM).

Design/methodology/approach

The SMk total process planning (TPP) framework was used, a simple but robust framework that consists of five stages: scoping, development, implementation, evaluation and follow-up. In addition, IM tools were embedded in the development stage to strengthen the development element of the campaign.

Findings

The use of the SMk TPP framework led to the selection of one specific target segment and behaviour. IM tools helped to select the most important and modifiable determinants and behaviours in the target segment, as well as to select and appropriately apply theoretical methods for influencing determinant and behaviour change. The resulting “Water Campaign” was aimed at Turkish and Moroccan mothers and their 6-12-year-old-children (target segment). This intervention addresses the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages through the promotion of tap water drinking (target behaviour). The systematic involvement of key stakeholders resulted in capacity-building and co-creation.

Originality/value

A key finding of the present work is that the SMk TPP framework and IM tools can be successfully combined in intervention development, helping to develop enhanced interventions. Combining these methods led to a theory-based and client-oriented intervention, which was directed at multiple ecological levels and which systematically involved key stakeholders. With this detailed description of the intervention development, this paper aims to assist other researchers and practitioners in their quest to develop better interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Book part

Christopher J. Coyne and Rachel L. Mathers

The fatal conceit is the assumption that the world can be shaped according to human desires. This chapter argues that the logic of the fatal conceit can be applied to…

Abstract

The fatal conceit is the assumption that the world can be shaped according to human desires. This chapter argues that the logic of the fatal conceit can be applied to foreign interventions which go beyond the limits of what can be rationally constructed by reason alone. In suffering from the fatal conceit, these interventions are characterized by: (1) the realization that intentions do not equal results, (2) a reliance on top-down planning, (3) the view of development as a technological issue, (4) a reliance on bureaucracy over markets, and (5) the primacy of collectivism over individualism. These characteristics explain why interventions extending beyond the limits of what can be rationally constructed tend to fail.

Details

What is so Austrian about Austrian Economics?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-261-7

Content available
Article

Andre Devaux, Maximo Torero, Jason Donovan and Douglas Horton

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to take stock of the current state of knowledge about inclusive value-chain development (VCD) in the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to take stock of the current state of knowledge about inclusive value-chain development (VCD) in the context of international agricultural research; and second, to draw out the implications for future research and action.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a review of recent research papers authored by professionals affiliated with international agricultural research centers and their partners in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Findings

The studies reviewed in the paper identify the opportunities emerging from new and expanding markets for agricultural products and challenges to smallholder participation in these markets. It identifies key attributes of successful value-chain interventions, emphasizing the importance of combining value-chain approaches with other approaches, including those emerging from innovation systems and rural livelihoods frameworks. Methods are offered for evaluating complex value-chain interventions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper summarizes the state of knowledge as of early 2016 in a dynamic field. Important contributions to knowledge may have been made since then.

Originality/value

The paper summarizes the state of knowledge in the field, and identifies emerging issues and policy implications, knowledge gaps, and priorities for future applied research.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Abstract

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action research, and data-based feedback methods. The role of personality in that change process, however, has historically been ignored or relegated to a limited set of interventions. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a conceptual overview of the linkages between personality and OD, discuss the current state of personality in the field including key trends in talent management, and offer a new multi-level framework for conceptualizing applications of personality for different types of OD efforts. The chapter concludes with implications for research and practice.

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Article

Li‐Teh Sun

The success of several newly industrialized countries has created a renewed interest in the role of government in economic development. In contrast to the…

Abstract

The success of several newly industrialized countries has created a renewed interest in the role of government in economic development. In contrast to the industrialization of the West, the government was much more involved during the development process of these east Asian nations. Attempts to address this question of how much government intervention still remains. Uses the human development index to represent the level of economic or human development; and selects four indicators to depict the degree of government intervention. Both empirical evidence and intuitive reasoning seem to support the conclusion that moderate government intervention contributes most to human development.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Fatemeh Rezaei and Michael Beyerlein

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine findings from empirical research regarding organizations’ talent development (TD) strategies, taking into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine findings from empirical research regarding organizations’ talent development (TD) strategies, taking into consideration the countries in which the studies were conducted and the TD-approach organizations adopted, and recognize the positive outcomes of TD implementation, as well as potential issues and challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This systematic literature review used Garrard’s matrix method to organize the review of publications. It identified 31 empirical articles from the total of 551 publications.

Findings

The findings indicate that a majority of the studies were conducted in countries other than the USA and that they were all published recently, after 2007. The results show that organizations have mostly applied organizational development interventions at the individual level for developing talented employees, followed by formal training and development. Additionally, managerial issues were identified as the most common issue on the way of implementing TD interventions.

Research limitations/implications

Trying to define TD as a discrete concept from HRD could be considered as both differentiating the current literature review and a limitation.

Originality/value

This article is among the first to identify TD interventions through a systematic literature review and provides a model of TD’s intervention antecedents and outcomes for the follow-up empirical works.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article

Caroline Lornudd, David Bergman, Christer Sandahl and Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz

The purpose of this paper was to assess two different leader development interventions by comparing their effects on leadership behaviour and evaluating their combined…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess two different leader development interventions by comparing their effects on leadership behaviour and evaluating their combined impact after two years, from the viewpoints of both the participating managers and external raters.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a longitudinal randomised controlled trial with a cross-over design. Health care managers (n = 177) were first randomised to either of two 10-month interventions and a year later were switched to the other intervention. Leadership behaviour was rated at pre-test and 12 and 24 months by participating managers and their superiors, colleagues and subordinates using a 360-degree instrument. Analysis of variance and multilevel regression analysis was performed.

Findings

No difference in effect on leadership behaviour was found between the two interventions. The evaluation of the combined effect of the interventions on leadership behaviour showed inconsistent (i.e. both increased and decreased) ratings by the various rater sources.

Practical implications

This study provides some evidence that participation in leadership development programmes can improve managers’ leadership behaviours, but the results also highlight the interpretive challenges connected with using a 360-degree instrument to evaluate such development.

Originality/value

The longitudinal randomised controlled design and the large sample comprising both managers and external raters make this study unusually rigorous in the field of leadership development evaluations.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article

Reuben Olugbenga Ayeleke, Nicola Henri North, Annette Dunham and Katharine Ann Wallis

Training to improve health management and leadership competence is recommended. However, there is limited evidence showing the impact of training on competence. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Training to improve health management and leadership competence is recommended. However, there is limited evidence showing the impact of training on competence. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence for the impact of training and professional development on health management and leadership competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted using a mixed-methods design. Studies using qualitative, quantitative or mixed-methods design were included. The following electronic databases were searched to October 2018: CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, NEDLINE and PsycINFO. Study eligibility and methodological quality were assessed independently by two review authors. Data from qualitative studies were synthesised using thematic analysis. For quantitative studies, odds ratio (OR) or mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each intervention. Where appropriate, qualitative and quantitative data were integrated into a single synthesis using Bayesian methods.

Findings

In total, 19 studies were identified for inclusion in the review. Training and professional development interventions using flexible, multiple training techniques tailored to organisational contexts can improve individual competence and performance. Such training is typified by a leadership development programme. There was insufficient evidence to determine the effects of interventions on organisational performance.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic review evaluating the impact of training and professional development interventions on health management and leadership competence.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Lindsay Elizabeth Kalis, Natalie M. Garza, Thomas J. Chermack, Victor A. Dzirasa and Mark J. Hutt

The purpose of this study is to determine the quantity, nature and frequency of intervention research published in Human Resource Development (HRD) journals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the quantity, nature and frequency of intervention research published in Human Resource Development (HRD) journals.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this study was a literature review, analysis and synthesis with specific attention to locating intervention research in HRD journals.

Findings

Based on the results of this study, it seems clear that intervention research is not a fundamental research method for HRD professionals and is not being consistently conducted across the HRD field. This raises potential questions about the extent to which HRD professionals are integrating research and practice. The presence and conduct of intervention research applied to HRD-related problems may provide another means for practitioners and scholars to work together toward optimal, practical solutions with evidence to support them.

Originality/value

Creating a community of professionals who assess and/or evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions and disseminate the information that lean toward causal claims is critical. Intervention research could represent a cultural shift for the HRD discipline because it lends weight to claims of causality and practical recommendations. Under these circumstances, HRD intervention research could be used with confidence by HRD practitioners to inform, shape or evaluate the content of their management and leadership training programs, including the training and development of coaching managers and coaching leaders.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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