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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Theres Konrad, Arnim Wiek and Matthias Barth

For professional sustainability work, graduates need to be able to work in teams and collaborate with stakeholders; in other words, they need to have developed…

Abstract

Purpose

For professional sustainability work, graduates need to be able to work in teams and collaborate with stakeholders; in other words, they need to have developed interpersonal competence. There is growing evidence that project-based sustainability courses facilitate interpersonal competence development. However, research so far has focused on single case studies and on assessing learning outcomes. The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of how graduate students learn interpersonal competence in project-based sustainability courses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a multi-case study approach triangulating observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups supported by Photovoice method. A comparison of three project-based sustainability courses in graduate programs at universities in the USA, Germany, Switzerland and Spain is conducted to gain generalizable insights on how interpersonal competence can be developed through project-based sustainability courses.

Findings

Receiving inputs, experiencing, reflecting and experimenting are four learning processes supportive of interpersonal competence development. Interpersonal attitudes seem to be mostly learned through a combination of experiencing and reflecting, followed by experimenting; not surprisingly, interpersonal knowledge is mostly developed through a combination of receiving inputs, experiencing and (collective) reflection; and interpersonal skills seem to be mostly learned through a combination of receiving inputs and experimenting, or, more directly, experiencing and experimenting.

Practical implications

These findings support the unique learning opportunities offered through project-based sustainability courses and can help instructors to better facilitate students’ development of interpersonal competence.

Originality/value

The value of this study is three-fold: (i) it provides a comprehensive picture of interpersonal competence, including attitudes, knowledge, and skills; (ii) it spells out specific teaching and learning processes; and (iii) it links these to specific interpersonal competence facets and components.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Susanne Wiatr Borg and Per Vagn Freytag

This paper aims to offer a two‐dimensional holistic framework for analyzing interpersonal relationships in the sales process in a business‐to‐business (B2B) context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a two‐dimensional holistic framework for analyzing interpersonal relationships in the sales process in a business‐to‐business (B2B) context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a literature study of the key concept, i.e. “interpersonal relationship”, three behavior‐based theoretical streams, and an eclectic range of existing models within the existing buyer‐seller literature.

Findings

The framework presented suggests that interpersonal relationships are comprehensible from four perspectives or levels in a sales process – i.e. environment, firm, sales cycle, and sales characteristics. The finding illustrated in the framework is that, in order to understand and manage interpersonal relationships in a sales process effectively, it is valuable to apply a holistic picture, thus including all four levels. This is because dynamic forces exist not only within each layer, but also between layers. In addition, it was found that existing normative directions that focus on managing interpersonal relationships in a sales process are currently contingent upon the level at which the analysis takes place. The findings suggest that future normative directions should instead apply a multi‐perspective approach.

Practical implications

The helicopter view framework of interpersonal relationships in a sales process presented here enables businesses to understand and optimize the interpersonal relationship strategy in their selling process.

Originality/value

By adopting a cross‐paradigm philosophy and a multi‐method approach, this paper offers a new, comprehensive framework for understanding a B2B selling process that focuses on interpersonal relationships. Furthermore, it presents a normative relationship management overview relevant to both academics and practitioners.

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Shalini Vohra

The existing literature on emotion regulation strategies provides important insights with regards to intrapersonal strategies for emotion regulation. However, in pointing…

Abstract

The existing literature on emotion regulation strategies provides important insights with regards to intrapersonal strategies for emotion regulation. However, in pointing out the limitations of intrapersonal emotion regulation models, it has been suggested that emotion regulation is not confined to intrapersonal processes and the complex social networks that humans form are intricately connected to their emotions. The previous work on financial traders has recognized the relevance of emotions in trading, focusing only on intrapersonal emotion regulation strategies. In this chapter, drawing on the author’s previous research on emotions in trading as well as existing research on social sharing of emotions and interpersonal emotion regulation, interpersonal emotion regulation strategies in the work of financial traders are identified. In doing so, an existing definition of interpersonal emotion regulation is extended and it is argued that while the pursuit of a regulatory goal is paramount, the benefits of interpersonal regulation may be achieved even in the absence of live social interaction, as long as labeling of the affective state takes place. The chapter concludes with a model summarizing intra–interpersonal emotion regulation processes.

Details

Individual, Relational, and Contextual Dynamics of Emotions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-844-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Nicholas Clarke

This paper aims to identify whether relationships exist between emotional intelligence (EI) and specific teamwork behaviours that are associated with transition, action…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify whether relationships exist between emotional intelligence (EI) and specific teamwork behaviours that are associated with transition, action and interpersonal team processes using the ability model of EI.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 68 MBA students comprising 13 randomly assigned teams completed a pencil and paper performance‐based test of emotional intelligence. Some 14 weeks later a score reflecting the extent team members engaged in a number of teamwork behaviours consistent with transition, action and interpersonal team processes was obtained from peer ratings.

Findings

Emotional intelligence was found to explain direct and unique variance in transition and interpersonal team processes. However, only three individual branches of EI were found to be of any significance, and these differed in each instance.

Practical implications

These findings add to the growing body of literature suggesting emotional intelligence may be an important aspect of individual difference amongst team members that can contribute to team effectiveness. Individuals with differing EI abilities may be particularly important to teams dependent upon the team's activity phase.

Originality/value

The paper shows that blanket assertions regarding the significance of emotional intelligence for team effectiveness are far too simplistic. Differing EI abilities are associated with particular teamwork behaviours, which in turn become important during different phases of team activity. The findings suggest a need for more sophisticated frameworks regarding how EI relates to specific cognitive, verbal and behavioural teamwork activities.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2019

Wei-Tsong Wang, Wen-Yi Lai and Chih-Tsen Lu

While it is important for entrepreneurship educators to understand the dynamics behind the formation of an individual entrepreneurial identity, challenges remain if they…

Abstract

Purpose

While it is important for entrepreneurship educators to understand the dynamics behind the formation of an individual entrepreneurial identity, challenges remain if they are to facilitate this process. Furthermore, while managing conflicts in entrepreneurial teams is a key to effective entrepreneurial learning, very few studies have focused on the relationships between individual entrepreneurial characteristics, interpersonal conflicts and the construction of an individual entrepreneurial identity. The purpose of this paper is to explore these relationships in a learning-by-doing educational context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts an in-depth dual case study design to explore the relationships between individual characteristics, interpersonal conflicts and the construction of individual entrepreneurial identity in a learning-by-doing entrepreneurship educational context.

Findings

A theoretical framework that addresses the construction of the entrepreneurial identity of entrepreneurial team members in a learning-by-doing environment from the perspectives of conflicts and entrepreneurial characteristics is developed.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings illustrate the influence of differences in individuals’ entrepreneurial characteristics on the occurrence of interpersonal task and relationship conflicts and, consequently, on individuals’ entrepreneurial identity. A number of intervening factors that mediate the relationships between entrepreneurial characteristics, interpersonal conflicts and entrepreneurial identity are also identified.

Originality/value

This study is among the first research efforts to connect individual entrepreneurial characteristics, interpersonal conflicts and the construction of the individual entrepreneurial identity.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Wei-Tsong Wang, Yi-Shun Wang and Wan-Ting Chang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different forms of interpersonal conflicts and employees’ psychological empowerment may affect knowledge sharing intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different forms of interpersonal conflicts and employees’ psychological empowerment may affect knowledge sharing intentions directly or indirectly via interpersonal trust in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected from 249 employees of 37 of the top 500 corporations in the manufacturing industry in Taiwan were used for the data analysis. The research model was analyzed using the component-based structural equation modeling technique, namely, the partial least squares (PLS) approach.

Findings

The results indicate that both relationship and task conflicts have significant indirect effects on employees’ knowledge sharing intentions via psychological empowerment and trust. Additionally, psychological empowerment significantly influences employees’ knowledge sharing intentions both directly and indirectly via trust.

Research limitations/implications

The primary theoretical implication is an advancement in the understanding of the critical antecedents of and their different effects on employees’ knowledge sharing intentions from the perspectives of conflict management and individual psychological empowerment. Future research may concentrate on investigating the bidirectional interactions among trust, relationship conflicts and task conflicts in different knowledge-sharing contexts.

Practical implications

This study provides practical insights into conflict resolution intended to facilitate psychological empowerment and interpersonal trust that encourage knowledge sharing in the workplace.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first knowledge sharing study that empirically examines how task and relationship conflicts affect employees’ knowledge sharing intentions differently via the mediation of their perceived psychological empowerment and interpersonal trust in one another in the workplace.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Theres Konrad, Arnim Wiek and Matthias Barth

Advanced skills in communication, teamwork and stakeholder engagement are widely recognized as important success factors for advancing sustainability. While project-based…

Abstract

Purpose

Advanced skills in communication, teamwork and stakeholder engagement are widely recognized as important success factors for advancing sustainability. While project-based learning formats claim to advance such skills, there is little empirical evidence that demonstrates how interpersonal competence is being developed. This study aims to describe and explains teaching and learning processes of project-based sustainability courses that contribute to the development of interpersonal competence as one of the key competencies in sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study on an international project-based learning course adopted a multi-method case study approach, triangulating observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups supported by Photovoice method through which students tracked their learning processes. Data collection and analysis followed a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Learning through and from conflicts within a learning community can foster competence development in teamwork, communication and stakeholder engagement. This study identified inner and outer conflicts (within individuals versus between individuals or groups) as potential drivers of learning processes, depending on strategies applied to address these conflicts.

Originality value

The value of this study is fourfold: it demonstrates how conflicts can be leveraged for students’ competence development; it provides in-depth empirical data from multiple perspectives, it discusses the findings in the context of teaching and learning theories, and it demonstrates an application of the Photovoice method to track and improve teaching and learning processes.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Jonathan H. Turner and Alexandra Maryanski

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to bring data to suggest that group processes have a biological base, lodged in human neurology as it evolved over the last 7…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to bring data to suggest that group processes have a biological base, lodged in human neurology as it evolved over the last 7 million years.

Design/methodology/approach – The method for discovering the neurological basis of group processes is labelled evolutionary sociology, and this method revolves around: (1) cladistic analysis of traits of distant ancestors to humans and the great apes, with whom humans share a very high proportion of genes, (2) comparative neurology between the great apes and humans that can inform us about how the brains of humans were rewired from the structures shared by the last common ancestor to humans and apes, and (3) ecological analysis of the habitats and niches that generated selection pressures on the neurology of apes and hominins.

Findings – A key finding is that most of the interpersonal processes that drive group processes are neurologically based and evolved before the brain among hominins was sufficiently large to generate systems of symbols organized in cultural texts remotely near the human measure. There is, then, good reason to study the neurological basis of behavior because neurology explains more about the dynamics of interpersonal behavior than does culture, which was a very late arrival to the hominin line.

Research implications – One implication of these findings is that social scientific analysis of interpersonal processes and group dynamics can no longer assume that groups are solely a constructed process, mediated by culture and social structure. There were powerful selection pressures during the course of hominin evolution to increase hominin sociality and especially group formation, which required considerable rewiring of the basic ape brain. Since groups are not “natural” to apes in general and even to an evolved ape-like humans, it is important to discover how humans ever became group-organizing animals. The answer resides in the dramatic enhancing of emotions in hominins and humans, which shifts attention away from the neocortex to the older subcortical areas of the brain. Once this shift is made, theorizing and research, as well as public views on human sociality, need to be recast as, first, an evolved biological trait and, only second, as a most tenuous and fragile of a big-brained animal using language and culture to construct its social world.

Originality/value – The value of this kind of analysis is to liberate sociology and the social sciences in general from simplistic views that, because humans have language and can use language to construct culture and social structures, the underlying biology and neurology of human action is not relevant to understanding the social world. Indeed, just the opposite is the case: to the extent that social scientists insist upon a social constructionists research agenda, they will fail to conceptualize and perform research on more fundamental forces in the social world, including group dynamics.

Details

Biosociology and Neurosociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-257-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Luu Trong Tuan

The cumulative pool of data piling through the empirical expedition around hospitals in Vietnam provides the clue on whether corporate social responsibility (CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

The cumulative pool of data piling through the empirical expedition around hospitals in Vietnam provides the clue on whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) influences upward influence behavior, which in turn catalyzes team processes and competitive intelligence scanning. The aim of this paper is to journey through the review of the constructs of CSR, upward influence behavior, and team processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling (SEM) approach served as an analyst for 349 responses returned from self‐administered structured questionnaires despatched to 522 hospital members in the middle‐management position.

Findings

A model of team processes and competitive intelligence evolved along the process of hypothesis testing. Ethical CSR was found to cultivate organizationally beneficial upward influence behavior in the healthcare service organizations.

Originality/value

The research findings provide the insight into the CSR‐based model of team processes which underscores the role of ethical CSR initiatives and organizationally beneficial upward influence tactics in the activation of competitive intelligence scanning deeds in hospitals in Vietnam business setting.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Satyanarayana Parayitam, Bradley J. Olson and Yongjian Bao

This paper aims to investigate the effects task conflict has on agreement seeking behavior and interpersonal conflict. In addition, it seeks to examine the moderating role…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects task conflict has on agreement seeking behavior and interpersonal conflict. In addition, it seeks to examine the moderating role of trust on the effects of agreement seeking behavior and interpersonal conflict on the styles of handing conflict, namely, avoidance, collaboration, and third party intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured survey instrument, this paper gathered data from 252 senior executives from Mainland China and analyzed these using the regression technique to see how interpersonal trust between executives moderates the relationship between conflict and conflict response mechanisms. The study also investigates the relationship between task and relationship conflict as well as agreement‐seeking behavior among Chinese executives in Mainland China.

Findings

Results show that the presence of interpersonal trust among executives affects the conflict responses for the benefit of organization. The results show that task conflict in top management teams is positively related to relationship conflict and negatively related to agreement‐seeking behavior. The data support the view that intra‐group trust moderates the relationship between agreement‐seeking behavior and collaborating responses such that high‐trust groups will have greater collaboration than low‐trusting teams. Results also support that intra‐group trust moderates the relationship between agreement‐seeking behavior and third party responses such that high‐trust groups will have greater third‐party responses than low‐trusting teams.

Research limitations/implications

Self‐report measures may have some inherent social desirability bias. Despite this potential weakness, this study examines Chinese executives and therefore provides insights into top management team literature.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both practicing managers as well as to strategic management literature. This study suggests that administrators need to focus on interpersonal trust while dealing with the outcomes of task and relationship conflict.

Originality/value

Although the study is related to Chinese executives, the findings from the study, that task conflict has its affect on interpersonal conflict and agreement‐seeking behavior, contribute to the strategic decision making literature.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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