Search results

1 – 10 of over 37000
Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2003

Noah E. Friedkin and Eugene C. Johnsen

This paper works at the intersections of affect control theory, expectation states theory, and social influence network theory. First, we introduce social influence

Abstract

This paper works at the intersections of affect control theory, expectation states theory, and social influence network theory. First, we introduce social influence network theory into affect control theory. We show how an influence network may emerge from the pattern of interpersonal sentiments in a group and how the fundamental sentiments that are at the core of affect control theory (dealing with the evaluation, potency, and activity of self and others) may be modified by interpersonal influences. Second, we bring affect control theory and social influence network theory to bear on expectation states theory. In a task-oriented group, where persons’ performance expectations may be a major basis of their interpersonal influence, we argue that persons’ fundamental sentiments may mediate effects of status characteristics on group members’ performance expectations. Based on the linkage of fundamental sentiments and interpersonal influence, we develop an account of the formation of influence networks in groups that is applicable to both status homogeneous and status heterogeneous groups of any size, whether or not they are completely connected, and that is not restricted in scope to task-oriented groups.

Details

Power and Status
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-030-2

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Sheng-Hsiung Chang and Chin-Wen Chang

Set in an emerging economy context, the purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of green consumers’ purchase behavior on organic food by analyzing the impact…

1726

Abstract

Purpose

Set in an emerging economy context, the purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of green consumers’ purchase behavior on organic food by analyzing the impact of word-of-mouth (WOM) effects (i.e. tie strength, sender’s green expertise, receiver’s green expertise), conformity behaviors (i.e. normative interpersonal influence and informational interpersonal influence) on green purchase intention, and the relationship between green purchase intention and green purchase behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire completed by respondents who had purchase experience of organic food in the last six months. The specific context of this study is green consumption for organic food in Taiwan. Data collection was implemented in a convenience sampling method. Among the 578 consumers who had filled the questionnaire, 147 did not have any purchase history of organic food, resulting in a final usable sample of 431 (response rate 74.57 percent) in Taiwan. The data were collected during a five-week period in late 2015.

Findings

Through structural equation modeling analysis, data were analyzed and the empirical results indicate that tie strength, sender’s green expertise, and receiver’s green expertise have a positive influence on green consumer’s susceptibility to informational interpersonal influences and normative interpersonal influences, separately. In addition, informational interpersonal influences and normative interpersonal influences both have a positive relationship on green purchase intention, which will further positively influence the green purchase behavior.

Originality/value

This study reminds marketers of the impact of WOM effects as well as interpersonal influences on consumers. It examines the impact of tie strength, senders’ green expertise, and receivers’ green expertise on green purchase intention and green purchase behavior. This study also explores the mediation effects of green consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influences. Consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influence is discussed in the marketing literature. However, few prior studies have explored its effect in the green setting. Last, few attempts have discussed the relationship between green purchase intention and green purchase behavior. This study contributes to the literature by examine the relationship between green purchase intentions and green purchase behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Denver D’Rozario and Pravat K. Choudhury

The impact of assimilation on a consumer’s susceptibility to interpersonal influence is assessed in samples of first‐generation Armenian and Chinese immigrants to the US…

2378

Abstract

The impact of assimilation on a consumer’s susceptibility to interpersonal influence is assessed in samples of first‐generation Armenian and Chinese immigrants to the US. We find that: (a) Chinese immigrants are more susceptible to interpersonal influence than are Anglo‐Americans who in turn are more susceptible to this influence than are Armenian immigrants, (b) Chinese immigrants are especially susceptible to the normative type of interpersonal influence and (c) Chinese immigrants’ susceptibility to both types of interpersonal influence decreases significantly as they identificationally‐assimilate, whereas Armenian immigrants’ susceptibility to both types of interpersonal influence decreases significantly as they structurally‐assimilate into the Anglo‐American macro‐culture.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Rajesh Iyer, Barry J. Babin, Jacqueline K. Eastman and Mitch Griffin

This study explores consumers' motivations to purchase luxury and counterfeit products using an international sample. In addition, it also examines the moderating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores consumers' motivations to purchase luxury and counterfeit products using an international sample. In addition, it also examines the moderating role of interpersonal influence on this process. This study seeks to examine if the consumers who demand the highest quality express a preference for luxury goods over counterfeit goods.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research was employed to subjects from the USA, India, China and Russia. Responses from US and India consumers were collected using online software, whereas responses from China and Russia were collected with the help of a local market research firm.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that consumers tend to show similar reactions based on the luxury and counterfeit consumption process examined here. In terms of interpersonal influence as a moderator, however, the study found it significantly impacts status seekers' attitude toward luxury and how a perfectionist shopper perceives counterfeit consumption.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first in the literature to empirically address both luxury and counterfeit consumption. Further it considers consumers from multiple countries with high levels of luxury good purchases.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2003

Michael W Preis, Salvatore F Divita and Amy K Smith

Missing in most of the research on selling has been an examination of the process from the point of view of the customer. When satisfaction in selling has been considered…

Abstract

Missing in most of the research on selling has been an examination of the process from the point of view of the customer. When satisfaction in selling has been considered, researchers have focused on the satisfaction of the salesperson with his job and/or the impact of this job satisfaction on performance (e.g. Bluen, Barling & Burns, 1990; Churchill, Ford & Walker, 1979; Pruden & Peterson, 1971). To concentrate on salesperson performance while neglecting customers is to ignore the most important half of the relationship between buyers and sellers and entirely disregards the marketing concept and the streams of research in customer satisfaction. This research takes a different approach and examines customers’ satisfaction with salespeople.

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack and David H. Silvera

This cross‐cultural study examines inter‐relationships between values (using the list of values), collective self‐esteem (CSE), and consumer susceptibility to interpersonal

5954

Abstract

Purpose

This cross‐cultural study examines inter‐relationships between values (using the list of values), collective self‐esteem (CSE), and consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (CSII).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through surveys administered to 783 university students in four countries (Australia, English‐speaking Canada, Korea, and Norway).

Findings

Results indicate that external and interpersonal values are positively related to the normative component of CSII, while internal values are negatively related to the normative component of CSII. The CSE subscale measuring importance of the group to one's identity is positively related to normative CSII, while the CSE subscale of membership esteem is negatively related to normative CSII. Normative CSII was substantially higher among Korean participants than among participants from the other countries.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to a sample of university students in Canada, Australia, Norway, and Korea. Future research could expand the sample to include a more representative adult sample, in order to ensure the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

CSII may be an important factor in many consumer purchases that relate to self‐image. The relationship of values and collective self‐esteem to CSII provides valuable insights to managers regarding consumer purchasing behavior.

Originality/value

Given that values, consumer self‐esteem, and country explain a large degree of the variation in consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence, managers can benefit from this knowledge when developing advertising content and marketing interventions.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Yongmei Liu, Jun Liu and Longzeng Wu

The purpose of this study is to explore an under‐researched, emotion‐focused influence tactic, strategic emotional display, and its interpersonal and career outcomes.

1121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore an under‐researched, emotion‐focused influence tactic, strategic emotional display, and its interpersonal and career outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 258 matched supervisor‐subordinate dyads in a Chinese sample.

Findings

The results indicate that individuals who use positive emotions in social influence tend to enhance their access to network resources and career growth potential, and those who use negative emotions in social influence tend to erode their network resources and hinder career growth potential.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of the research is that the authors collected data on both strategic emotional display and network resources from the same source at the same time. Supporting prior research, the results indicate that individuals do use emotional expression as a social influence tactic at work, and that different emotion‐focused influence tactics are associated with different outcomes. The study makes evident the need to integrate the emotion and the social influence literature.

Practical implications

The results of the study indicate that employees may need to develop greater awareness of their own emotions, and cultivate the ability to convey emotional cues to others effectively. It also appears that individuals need to be selective in their use of emotion‐focused influence tactics.

Originality/value

The paper integrates social influence and emotion research, and focuses on a ubiquitous yet overlooked influence tactic, strategic emotional display, and shows evidence that it is associated with interpersonal and career outcomes.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Weidong Rong, Mark J. Arnold and Brad D. Carlson

Guanxi is the foundation of business success in Chinese and other Eastern cultures, but little is known about the extent to which guanxi influences brand outcomes in…

Abstract

Purpose

Guanxi is the foundation of business success in Chinese and other Eastern cultures, but little is known about the extent to which guanxi influences brand outcomes in channel relationships. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel theoretical framework of interpersonal and interorganizational guanxi relationships in a sales channel context and how these relationships influence brand outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conceptualize, develop and validate new scales measuring interpersonal and interorganizational guanxi and test the proposed model with a field study to validate the effects of guanxi on brand loyalty. The causal relationships between interpersonal guanxi and brand attitudes and affect are confirmed in a separate field experiment.

Findings

Findings show that interpersonal guanxi is antecedent to interorganizational guanxi, and these two constructs have significant and differential direct and indirect effects on brand attitudes, brand affect and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

New multidimensional scales measuring both interpersonal and interorganizational guanxi were developed. Both interpersonal and interorganizational guanxi are conceptualized as second-order reflective constructs measured by the reflective first-order guanxi elements of personal and firm trust, personal and firm long-term orientation, xinyong (integrity), reciprocity, interaction and face.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack and Stephen J.S. Holden

Examines the personal values of college‐age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to…

5277

Abstract

Examines the personal values of college‐age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to non‐smokers, smokers are less likely to place importance on the values of security, being well respected, and having a sense of belonging. When compared to non‐beer drinkers, college students who are beer drinkers are more likely to place importance on the value of excitement, and are less likely to place importance on the value of security. Smokers are less susceptible to interpersonal influence than non‐smokers, but there are no differences in susceptibility to interpersonal influence between beer drinkers and non‐beer drinkers. Values and susceptibility to interpersonal influence can play a useful role as descriptors, and possibly as predictors, of drinking and smoking behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Frank Ulbrich

Frameworks on information systems‐sourcing (IS‐sourcing) decisions are frequently based on rational‐choice theory, neglecting such non‐quantifiable aspects as interpersonal

1439

Abstract

Purpose

Frameworks on information systems‐sourcing (IS‐sourcing) decisions are frequently based on rational‐choice theory, neglecting such non‐quantifiable aspects as interpersonal conflicts. The purpose of this paper is to find out whether such interpersonal conflicts have a determining influence on an organization's IS‐sourcing decision.

Design/methodology/approach

An illustrative case‐study strategy is applied.

Findings

The following interpersonal conflicts had a determining influence on an organization's IS‐sourcing decision: tensions between personnel in the IS department and those in the users' departments; lack of capabilities on a personal level; power in and between departments; and face‐saving in the corporate group. Based on these empirical findings, a generic model is developed to illustrate how interpersonal conflicts enmesh with economic, business, and technical factors, and influence IS‐sourcing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The generic model enables researchers to study IS‐sourcing decisions better. It enriches previous research on IS‐sourcing decisions and alerts researchers that they need to cope with non‐quantifiable aspects that can have an impact on IS‐sourcing decisions.

Practical implications

Once managers understand how interpersonal conflicts can influence an organization's IS‐sourcing decision, they can assess their own organizations more accurately and estimate outcomes of particular IS‐sourcing decisions more realistically. Thus, this paper enables organizations to make better IS‐sourcing decisions, thereby – in the long run – helping them to use IS more effectively in their attempts to improve their business performances and competitive advantages.

Originality/value

This paper extends previous research on IS‐sourcing and fills a gap in traditional frameworks on IS‐sourcing decisions. It illustrates how various types of interpersonal conflicts enmesh with economic, business, and technical factors, and influence IS‐sourcing decisions.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 37000