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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Jianru Zhang, Ju'e Guo, James Jiang, Xiaosong Wu and Randi Jiang

This study aims to validate whether enhancing interorganizational task interdependence among tier 2 suppliers can act as an effective approach for the tier 1 supplier to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to validate whether enhancing interorganizational task interdependence among tier 2 suppliers can act as an effective approach for the tier 1 supplier to enhance collaborations among these suppliers in the buyer-tier 1 supplier-tier 2 supplier triadic new product development (NPD) project when buyer's requirements are unstable.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on social interdependence theory, a model linking interorganizational task interdependence to interorganizational collaboration and NPD product performance is built. The authors conducted a survey study to collect data from 169 automotive tier 1 suppliers and performed regression analysis to empirically test the hypotheses.

Findings

The test results suggest that interorganizational task interdependence among tier 2 suppliers can promote interorganizational promotion-oriented information sharing and interorganizational joint decision making among these suppliers. These improvements can ultimately improve supplier’s NPD product performance. However, the buyer’s requirements uncertainty can reduce the positive effects of such an interdependence arrangement.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into the role of a tier 1 supplier to enhance the collaboration among tier 2 suppliers in the limited condition of this relationship while providing an alternative explanation regarding contradictory ideas about task interdependence among suppliers.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Lei Chi and Clyde W. Holsapple

To develop a process model of interorganizational systems (IOS) collaboration and systematic framework for understanding and classifying IOS technologies for

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a process model of interorganizational systems (IOS) collaboration and systematic framework for understanding and classifying IOS technologies for interorganizational collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper synthesizes relevant concepts and findings in the IOS, economics, and management literature. It also presents empirical examples to illustrate key issues, practices, and solutions involved in IOS collaboration.

Findings

An integrative model of IOS collaboration is introduced and knowledge sharing, participative decision making, and conflict governance identified as three behavioral process elements underlying effective interorganizational collaboration. Extending Kumar and van Dissel's IOS framework to directly recognize these elements, a more complete collaboration‐oriented framework for characterizing key elements of interorganizational collaboration and classifying IOS technologies is developed.

Research limitations/implications

This paper brings together diverse ideas into a systematic view of collaboration via interorganizational systems. It contributes to a deeper, fuller understanding of issues involved in achieving collaborative advantage with IOS technologies. The paper also identifies factors and relationships that researchers should consider in designing empirical studies, posing hypotheses about collaboration via IOS, and analyzing results.

Practical implications

The model and framework can serve as a check‐list of considerations that need to be dealt with by leaders of collaboration‐oriented IOS initiatives. The IOS framework and technology classification may also suggest ways in which IT vendors might provide better technological solutions, services, and software for interorganizational collaboration.

Originality/value

This new IOS collaboration model and framework provide more complete and useful guidance for researchers, educators, and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Samanthi Ekanayake, Paul Childerhouse and Peter Sun

Social network perspective to interorganizational relations focuses on the effect of organizations’ external relationships in collaboration as opposed to their internal…

Abstract

Purpose

Social network perspective to interorganizational relations focuses on the effect of organizations’ external relationships in collaboration as opposed to their internal resources and capabilities. It presumes that effectively managing such relationships is vital to gaining collaborative synergies. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the growing interest in the social network perspective to explain supply chain collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature from the network field is discussed in the context of interorganizational collaboration. A logistics service provider’s network is explored in depth leading to the inductive construction of a multi-level model of social network collaboration.

Findings

The conceptual model provides a useful lens to evaluate supply chain collaboration. The symbiotic relationship between interorganizational and interpersonal networks is highlighted as vital for effective collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual model has only been developed from a single network. Wider application is required to ensure generalizability. The critical role of the personal networks of boundary spanning actors at different levels wants further investigation.

Practical implications

Partners’ intra-organizational structures and personal ties of boundary spanners, both at the senior and operational level, have a profound effect on supply chain operations.

Originality/value

Personal networks interact with organizational networks and complement each other in yielding interfirm collaborative synergies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Stavros Sindakis, Sakshi Aggarwal and Charles Chen

The purpose of this paper is to analyze important theoretical work conducted in the research streams of coopetition dynamics and knowledge flows in the area of start-up…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze important theoretical work conducted in the research streams of coopetition dynamics and knowledge flows in the area of start-up entrepreneurship. The authors see in practice that venture capital (VC) firms are a highly essential component of the environment that gives birth to entrepreneurial ventures, helping them to grow profoundly. Interorganizational collaborations facilitate VC firms to be a beneficial partner because except for providing funding, they also possess knowledge-based resources to support the new business.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature was conducted, using relevant keywords and academic databases. Then, the backward search was implemented to examine the references of the selected papers, and finally, the forward search to explore the citations of the selected papers. After the selection of papers, they were classified according to their content. A thorough search of the extant literature was done in Scopus and Google Scholar using a combination of keywords such as coopetition, knowledge flows, VC firms, interorganizational and inter-firm knowledge dynamics.

Findings

This paper highlights the capability of venture capitalists and provides insights as to how knowledge transfer and sharing between VC firms affect new venture’s growth and prosperity.

Research limitations/implications

This paper attempts to provide new perspectives and explore the significance of interorganizational coopetition and knowledge transfer and sharing between VC firms when they take part in the support and development of new ventures (e.g. start-ups). A theoretical model is proposed via the coopetition dynamics and inter-firm knowledge flows in the VC sector framework.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing theoretical knowledge and underlines the topic of interorganizational coopetition and knowledge flows between VC firms. This is the first attempt, on the one hand, to link inter-firm knowledge flows and new venture development, while on the other to examine the dynamics between VC firms and the collective contribution for the growth of start-ups.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Don Mankin, Susan Cohen and Stephen P. Fitzgerald

People have worked together since the beginnings of human time. Since then the forms of collaboration have barely changed. While a group of laborers building the pyramids…

Abstract

People have worked together since the beginnings of human time. Since then the forms of collaboration have barely changed. While a group of laborers building the pyramids of Egypt might seem to bear little resemblance to a team of machine operators working in a plant, they actually have much in common. Both groups are made up of people of similar backgrounds with clear loyalties and interests, interacting face-to-face to perform relatively well-defined tasks in pursuit of a shared goal.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Giovanni Battista Dagnino, Gabriella Levanti, Anna Minà and Pasquale Massimo Picone

This paper aims to explore the latent structure of the literature on interorganizational network and innovation as well as to map the main themes and empirical advances in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the latent structure of the literature on interorganizational network and innovation as well as to map the main themes and empirical advances in this research stream.

Design/methodology/approach

Using bibliometric coupling, the authors analyze the citation patterns in 67 management studies regarding innovation networks, published in ISI-journals from January 1996 to October 2012.

Findings

The authors identify the conceptual orientations that studies share. Bibliometric analysis allows us to draw an overview of how this field of research has developed, recognizing in essence six main clustered research themes: networks as a framework that sustains firm innovativeness in specific contexts; network dimensions and knowledge processes; networks as a means to access and share resources/knowledge; the interplay between firm and network characteristics and its effects on innovative processes; empirical research on networks in highly dynamic industries; and the influence of industry knowledge domain’s peculiarities on network dimensions and characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

By providing a comprehensive survey of current trends in the literature on interorganizational network and innovation, the authors eventually identify the major gaps in our knowledge and help refocusing the current research agenda in this increasingly relevant research stream.

Practical implications

The systematic introduction to the field of innovation networks is of notable interest to scholars and practitioners, who have (or desire to have) some awareness in the topic. Here, practitioners may find their compass to acquire some knowledge on innovation networks and orient their choices.

Originality/value

First, the spatially organized picture of the intellectual structure of the literature the authors offer is the initial thought-out comprehensive introduction to the field of on interorganizational network and innovation. Second, by developing a thorough bibliometric analysis of the extant bulk of the innovation networks literature, the authors develop specific methodological contribution. Third, we are able to map the intellectual structure in a two-dimensional space to visualize spatial distances between intellectual themes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Rebecca M. Rice

The purpose of this paper is to expand understandings of interorganizational collaboration among high reliability organizations (HROs). It proposes that HROs face unique…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand understandings of interorganizational collaboration among high reliability organizations (HROs). It proposes that HROs face unique needs for relationship building, pre-planning, and retrospective sensemaking that do not fit within prior models of collaboration. For HROs, definitions of collaboration vary contextually based on needs that arise during emergency situations. HROs have a need for both hierarchical structure and collaborative processes and use collaboration as a sensemaking frame that allows practitioners to attend to both needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study from an ongoing ethnographic study of an emergency response collaboration. The paper uses open-ended interviews about collaboration with all key members of the incident response hierarchy, and participant observation of collaboration before, during and after a key emergency incident.

Findings

The paper proposes a new framework for HRO collaboration: that collaboration is a sensemaking frame for HROs used to make sense of individual actions, that HRO collaboration is more complex during pre-planning and focused on individual decision making during incidents, and that members can communicatively make sense of the need for hierarchy and collaborative action by defining these needs contextually.

Research limitations/implications

The paper uses an in-depth case study of an incident to explore this collaborative framework; therefore, researchers are encouraged to test this framework in additional high reliability collaborative contexts.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for best communicative practices to recognize the need to be both hierarchical and flexible in high reliability organizing.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a need to expand collaboration literature beyond idealized and egalitarian definitions, in order to understand how practitioners use communication to understand their actions as collaborative, especially in organizations that also require hierarchy and individual actions. This case study suggests that collaboration as a sensemaking frame creates collaborative advantages for HROs, but can also limit sensemaking about incident management.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Xiaohong Liu, Cheng Qian and Shenghui Wang

This paper draws on the perspective of social networks to examine when 3PLs initiate low-carbon supply chain integration (LCSCI) in decarbonising supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper draws on the perspective of social networks to examine when 3PLs initiate low-carbon supply chain integration (LCSCI) in decarbonising supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on a sample of 348 Chinese 3PLs. Stepwise regression was adopted to analyse the data.

Findings

It is found that LCSCI has a positive effect on firm performance. From the social network perspective, a larger scope of outsourcing increases 3PLs' embeddedness, which increases their chance of success in initiating LCSCI, especially for 3PLs with higher decarbonisation capabilities. Interestingly, although the pressure from government regulation can also motivate LCSCI, it is less effective for 3PLs with higher decarbonisation capabilities because they can be too embedded in the network to freely adapt to regulations.

Research limitations/implications

This study has investigated 3PL-initiated LCSCI only from the view of 3PLs. A dyadic approach which includes the perception of customers would be desirable.

Practical implications

The results highlight the critical role of 3PLs as supply chain orchestrators in decarbonising supply chains, and the effectiveness of LCSCI as a competitive strategy of 3PLs. Coercive pressures from government regulations are not constraints but resources for 3PLs in initiating LCSCI, especially in markets where the 3PLs have insufficient decarbonisation capabilities.

Originality/value

This study contributes to theories on 3PLs' interorganizational low-carbon initiatives, LCSCI, and the paradox of social networks in supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Amitabh Anand, Louise Brøns Kringelum, Charlotte Øland Madsen and Louisa Selivanovskikh

Scholarly interest in interorganizational learning (IOL) has spiked in the past decade because of its potential to absorb, transfer and create valuable knowledge for…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholarly interest in interorganizational learning (IOL) has spiked in the past decade because of its potential to absorb, transfer and create valuable knowledge for enhanced innovative performance and sustained competitive advantage. However, only a handful of review studies exists on the topic. The evolution of IOL has not been studied explicitly and there is a lack of understanding of the field trends. To fill this gap, this paper aims to comprehensively review the literature on IOL and map its evolution and trends using bibliometric techniques. In particular, the authors use visualization of science mapping freeware to systematize the findings and interpret the results.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors synthesize the findings using “evaluative bibliometric techniques” to identify the quality and quantity indicators of the IOL research and use “relational bibliometric techniques” to determine the structural indicators of the IOL field such as the intellectual foundations and emerging research themes of IOL research.

Findings

Through an analysis of 208 journal publications obtained from the Scopus database, the authors determine the leading authors, countries, highly cited papers and their contributions to the IOL literature. By identifying the key hotspots, intellectual foundations and emerging trends of IOL, the authors provide promising avenues in IOL research.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this study is the first to systematically review the IOL literature and provide future research directions.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

LuAnne R. Johnson and David Knoke

We construct a theory of team collaboration to explain how social actors activate their network ties to gain access to and acquire the use of social capital held by other…

Abstract

We construct a theory of team collaboration to explain how social actors activate their network ties to gain access to and acquire the use of social capital held by other network actors. Drawing from weak-strong tie theory and closure-brokerage models of network structures, our theory specifies dynamic processes in which relations vary in their potential for activation, and thus, project teams have differential probabilities of mobilizing and gaining collective use of the varied resources held by their network alters inside and outside the team. The theoretical scope is interorganizational team whose members are employed by two partnering organizations and are assigned to a joint project with a single task or goal to be accomplished within a limited period. We present and discuss a set of propositions about factors that affect the ability of a team to access its members’ social capital for use in a project task.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

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