Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Jesse Wynn, Aaron Hudyma, Elizabeth Hauptman, Tiffani Nicole Houston and James Michael Faragher

– The purpose of this paper is to seek to present an overview of past, present, and future approaches to the treatment of problem gambling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to present an overview of past, present, and future approaches to the treatment of problem gambling.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature concerning conceptual, historical, and clinical research perspectives on the treatment of problem gambling.

Findings

Perspectives on the etiology, maintenance, conceptualization, and treatment of problem gambling have evolved over time. Once seen as a failure of moral character, problem gambling is now considered to be an addictive disorder with similarities to substance abuse disorders. Empirical research into the treatment of problem gambling is progressing, but is relatively sparse compared to the body of research in other addictive disorders. Methodological issues have been identified that will need to be addressed in future research. Currently, cognitive-behavioral approaches have received the most attention and have the greatest amount of research support. Brief interventions, pharmacological interventions, family therapy, and Gamblers Anonymous are also in use. Future directions for problem gambling treatment that are being researched and implemented are mindfulness-based interventions and internet-based treatment approaches.

Originality/value

This review should be useful to those seeking general information about problem gambling treatment, its development, status, and future directions.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Barrie Gunter

Abstract

Details

Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Michelle L. Pickett, Joi Wickliffe, Amanda Emerson, Sharla Smith and Megha Ramaswamy

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into justice-involved women’s preferences for an internet-based Sexual Health Empowerment (SHE) curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into justice-involved women’s preferences for an internet-based Sexual Health Empowerment (SHE) curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed data from four focus groups conducted with 52 women in a minimum-security county jail in a Midwestern US city.

Findings

Women reported daily access to the internet while in the community and use of the internet for searching about health concerns. Four themes emerged in the discussion about preferences for an internet-based SHE curriculum, that it cover healthy sexual expression, how to access resources, video as an educational modality and a non-judgmental approach.

Practical implications

Justice-involved women are potentially reachable through internet-based health education. Their preferences for content and modality can be used to inform internet-based sexual health programming designed specifically for this population. Using this modality could offer easily disseminated, low-cost and consistent messaging about sexual health for a vulnerable group of women.

Originality/value

Though internet-based health education programming has been widely utilized in the general population, less attention has been paid to if and how these programs could be utilized with a vulnerable group of women who move between the justice system and communities. This exploratory study begins to fill that gap.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Louise A. Ellis, Kathryn McCabe, Tracey Davenport, Jane M. Burns, Kitty Rahilly, Mariesa Nicholas and Ian B Hickie

This paper aims to describe the development of WorkOut, an Internet-based program designed to help young men overcome the barriers towards help-seeking and to build the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the development of WorkOut, an Internet-based program designed to help young men overcome the barriers towards help-seeking and to build the skills they need to understand and manage their own mental health. Information and communication technologies (ICT) hold great potential to significantly improve mental health outcomes for hard-to-reach and traditionally underserved groups. Internet-based programs and mobile phone applications may be particularly appealing to young men due to their convenience, accessibility and privacy and they also address the strong desire for independence and autonomy held by most men.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we describe the design process itself, and the strategies used for multi-disciplinary collaboration. The initial evaluation process and results are also described which consisted of three distinct phases: website statistics; one-on-one user testing; and pilot interviews.

Findings

The results suggest that WorkOut has the potential to attract young men. However, further work is needed to ensure that users remain engaged with the program.

Originality/value

The difficulties encountered and lessons learned provide an insight into the factors that should be considered in the design and evaluation of future ICT-based strategies within the mental health domain, as well as their potential applicability to clinical and educational settings.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 2 June 2014

Janan J. Dietrich, Jenny Coetzee, Kennedy Otwombe, Sanele Mdanda, Busisiwe Nkala, Matamela Makongoza, Celokhuhle Tshabalala, Stefanie Hornschuh, Christine N. Soon, Angela Kaida, Robert Hogg, Glenda E. Gray and Cari L. Miller

– The purpose of this paper is to measure prevalence and predictors of mobile phone access and use among adolescents in Soweto, South Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure prevalence and predictors of mobile phone access and use among adolescents in Soweto, South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study was an interviewer-administered, cross-sectional survey among adolescents 14-19 years living in a hyper-endemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) setting in South Africa.

Findings

Of 830 participants; 57 per cent were female. The median age was 18 years (IQR: 17-18). Mobile phone access was high (91 per cent). Almost half of participants (42 per cent) spent more than five hours daily using their mobile phones. Two-thirds (62 per cent) had access to the internet, most (84 per cent) accessed the internet via their mobile phones. Mobile phone access was more likely amongst Sotho language speakers (aOR: 2.87, 95 per cent CI: 1.30-6.36), those living in formal housing (aOR: 3.55, 95 per cent CI: 1.97-6.42) and those who reported heterosexual orientation (aOR: 2.37, CI: 1.35-4.16).

Originality/value

This study substantially contributes to the literature about mobile phones usage and patterns among school-going adolescents in Soweto, South Africa.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Tiraya Lerthattasilp, Lampu Kosulwit, Muthita Phanasathit, Winitra Nuallaong, Pairath Tapanadechopone, Chommakorn Thanetnit and Thammanard Charernboon

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an online psychological support group on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a Thai field hospital.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an online psychological support group on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a Thai field hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A prospective controlled trial was conducted at a Thai field hospital and included patients with confirmed COVID-19 who were over the age of 18 and able to use an online communication application. Patients were free to decide whether to participate in the online group. The group provided a space for participants to communicate with each other and a mental health service team. The everyday activities were designed to enable group support via texting or livestreaming through the LINE application. Psychoeducation via video clips or articles regarding stress management were provided. Outcomes were measured by an online self-reported questionnaire based on the twenty-one-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) on the first and fourteenth day of admission to the field hospital.

Findings

Forty-six patients participated in this study. Forty participants completed the secondary assessment, with 21 in the intervention group and 19 in the control group. From multilevel mixed-effects regression analysis, adjusted for gender, age and education, participation in the intervention group significantly decreased total DASS scores and anxiety subdomain scores compared to those in the control group (p = 0.038 and 0.008).

Originality/value

The online psychological support group offered benefits for patients with COVID-19 who were isolated in the field hospital. It could be an effective alternative measure to distribute psychological care during a pandemic situation. However, a small sample size was a limitation of this study.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Sue Holttum

This article aims to summarise two papers from Australia on supporting young people in early intervention for psychosis. Both have implications for young people's social…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to summarise two papers from Australia on supporting young people in early intervention for psychosis. Both have implications for young people's social inclusion and the design of early intervention services.

Design/methodology/approach

The first paper reports a new analysis of a trial of specialist employment and education support in an early intervention service. It used a statistical method called logistic regression to test whether only employment support predicted 41 participants’ success in getting into employment and education, or whether things like condition severity also mattered. The second paper reports on a new online support package for young people with “first episode psychosis” and how acceptable it was. The authors looked at 20 participants’ use of the package, and examined their well‐being before and after using it.

Findings

The first paper reported that nothing except getting specialist employment and education support predicted young people's entry to work or education. They recommend that young people in early intervention should not be denied vocational support because of things like “psychiatric symptoms”. In the second paper, young people in early intervention who used the online package reacted positively. The authors recommend a full controlled trial of the package. It could help young people when leaving the service to maintain their gains.

Originality/value

These papers advance research on early intervention psychosis services regarding young people's social inclusion needs. Specialist vocational support could prevent life‐long social exclusion. An innovative online support package has not yet been proven, but with fast‐evolving technology, it might help future service users stay well when leaving the service.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Click here to view access options

Abstract

Details

Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Hasriani, Elly Lilianty Sjattar and Rosyidah Arafat

This review aims to describe the effectiveness of education with the transtheoretical model (TTM)-based on the self-care behavior of hypertension patients.

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to describe the effectiveness of education with the transtheoretical model (TTM)-based on the self-care behavior of hypertension patients.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature search was carried out on four databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane and Grey literature to identify studies reported in English which were published in the last ten years. The literature search was conducted from November 13 to December 10, 2020.

Findings

Based on the six studies that have been analyzed, TTM is effective in changing the stage of change and behavior of hypertension patients. These behavioral changes have an impact on the patient's controlled blood pressure. Various types of TTM-based educational interventions can be used, but the tailored behavior intervention is the most appropriate one with a minimum intervention duration of six months. Educational intervention is carried out through combine counseling and education using electronic media.

Originality/value

This review presents the effectiveness of transtheoretical-based health education in changing the self-care behavior of hypertension patients accompanied by evidence-based on its implementation. There is a high and unclear risk of bias on several items influence this systematic outcome. Nevertheless, this review can still provide an overview of the effectiveness of education based on the TTM in hypertension patients about the quality results of the reviewed studies.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Alireza Noruzi

The purpose of this paper is to indicate that when webotherapy is applied, it can be of benefit to clients in giving them insight into their problems, resulting in a…

Downloads
1168

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to indicate that when webotherapy is applied, it can be of benefit to clients in giving them insight into their problems, resulting in a change of behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Webotherapy, which can be conducted with individuals or groups, refers to the use of web resources or other online reading material (e.g. e‐books, e‐journals) to assist clients (especially children and young adults) in their healing process. It may be defined as the use of web resources to help others gain additional insight and to help them cope with everyday life. Most people have probably read web resources to determine how others have approached a delicate issue.

Findings

This paper suggests that webotherapy is a potentially powerful method for psychologists, librarians, schoolteachers and counselors to use on many levels. It begins with a brief review of the history of webotherapy, continues with a discussion of some approaches to webotherapy (developmental, clinical, and interactive), then addresses the four basic stages of webotherapy (identification, selection, presentation, and follow‐up), and finally discusses the benefits and limitations of webotherapy.

Originality/value

The paper discusses webotherapy and offers a review of literature on related fields.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000