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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Md. Nurul Momen, Harsha S. and Debobrata Das

This paper aims to highlight the very recent cases of internet shutdown during the creation of Union territory of Jammu and Kashmir and enactment of Citizenship Amendment…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the very recent cases of internet shutdown during the creation of Union territory of Jammu and Kashmir and enactment of Citizenship Amendment Act and the detention under Section 66 (A) of Information Technology Act 2000.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes up a broad explorative discussion of the challenges posed to the consolidation of democracy in India due to frequent internet shutdowns for online communication and social media usages.

Findings

As findings, it is narrated that due to politically motivated reasons, India compromises its commitment to the pluralism and diversity in views, in particular, individual rights to freedom of expression and opinion, enshrined in the constitution.

Originality/value

Right to freedom of speech and expression has now taken a new shape due to the emergence and availability of the internet that enriches the quality of democracy.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Before the pandemic, Africa was the fastest growing continent for developers globally, tech hubs growing by nearly 50% in 2019 alone to exceed 640 by 2020.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB263218

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Susan Ariel Aaronson

Companies, governments and individuals are using data to create new services such as apps, artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT). These data-driven…

1158

Abstract

Purpose

Companies, governments and individuals are using data to create new services such as apps, artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT). These data-driven services rely on large pools of data and a relatively unhindered flow of data across borders (few market access or governance barriers). The current approach to governing cross-border data flows through trade agreements and has not led to binding, universal or interoperable rules governing the use of data. The purpose of this article is to explain the new role of data in trade and to explain why data in trade is different from trade in other goods and services. We then suggest a new approach at the national and international levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses a mixed methods approach to examine what the literature says about data as a traded good and or service, examines metaphors regarding the role of data in the economy, and then examines whether or not data is really “traded.”

Findings

Many countries do not know how to regulate data driven services. There is no consensus on what the appropriate regulatory environment looks like, nor is there a consensus on what are the barriers to cross-border data flows and what constitutes legitimate domestic regulation.

Originality/value

This is the first article to explain both the unique nature of data and the ineffectiveness of the trade system to address that distinctiveness.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Emma Pauncefort

2019 was a big year. The Great Hack and investigative journalism of Carole Cadwalladr exposed the machinations of Cambridge Analytica. The US senate summoned Mark…

Abstract

2019 was a big year. The Great Hack and investigative journalism of Carole Cadwalladr exposed the machinations of Cambridge Analytica. The US senate summoned Mark Zuckerberg to face an extended interrogation on the ways in which Facebook screens content. Greta Thunberg fomented a global ‘climate emergency’ movement with attacks on lying political leaders. If 2016 saw ‘post-truth’ rise to prominence as a concept, 2019 was characterised by myriad efforts to champion truth and counter misinformation. And then the COVID-19 crisis hit. The urgency we began to feel in 2019 to address the ills in our society and hunt for a cause and cure has intensified. We now daily ask at whose door we can lay the blame and, from there, what solutions we can implement. For now, we have drawn the battle lines between tech and society and looked to pit governments against technologies which have changed the face of media. But amidst this flurry of activity, we need to stop and ask ourselves: are we setting our sights on the right actors and are we taking the right next steps?

Written in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, this contribution responds to the burning debate on how to overcome our current infodemic and immunise against future outbreaks. It offers an alternative narrative and argues for a much more radical course of action. It posits that we have misidentified the root cause of our current post-truth reality. It argues that we are in fact experiencing the extreme consequence of decades of poor education the world over. It champions a shift from drilling young people in so-called facts and figures to developing those deep levels of literacy in which critical thinking plays a fundamental part. This is not to exculpate the Facebooks and Twitters of our time – new tech has no doubt facilitated the dissemination of half-truths and untruths. But it is to insist upon contextualising our current albeit horrifying reality within a much more complex and longer-running societal challenge. In other words, this chapter makes a fresh clarion call for rethinking how we have got to where we are and where we might most meaningfully go next, as well as how, indeed, we might conceptualise the links between technology, government, media and education.

Details

Media, Technology and Education in a Post-Truth Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-907-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Essam Mansour

The purpose of this paper is to asses the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution, also known as the “Arab Spring”.

6182

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to asses the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution, also known as the “Arab Spring”.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methods used were an adaptive form of snowball sampling of a heterogeneous demographic group of participants in the Revolution, used to select focus groups to explore a range of relevant issues.

Findings

SNSs are shown to have played a central and pivotal role in the events known collectively as the Arab Spring. Their importance as a source of non‐governmental information and as a means of informing the external and internal community of internal events is highlighted by all participants.

Originality/value

The paper outlines research into contemporary events of global significance.

Details

Library Review, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 28 April 2022

INT: Internet shutdowns return to pre-pandemic trends

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES268885

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Graphic analysis
Publication date: 5 May 2022

Internet shutdowns are returning to pre-pandemic levels across all major developing regions

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-GA269997

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 February 2017

For over a month, the government has imposed an internet shutdown in the largely anglophone regions of Northwest and Southwest Cameroon. This stoppage followed a…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB218129

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Graphic analysis
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Governments across the developing world are regularly shutting down online communication to restore political control

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-GA262420

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Expert briefing
Publication date: 22 December 2021

On the contrary, since May, when the anti-junta National Unity Government (NUG) formed a military wing, fighting has spread nationwide. The most critical arena in the…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB266294

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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