Search results

1 – 10 of over 71000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Alan Wilson and Nial Laskey

This paper examines how online market research is utilised within UK market research agencies and what opportunities or problems this new research tool is giving the…

Downloads
13480

Abstract

This paper examines how online market research is utilised within UK market research agencies and what opportunities or problems this new research tool is giving the market research industry. The research involved sending 120 postal questionnaires to UK based market research agencies that claimed to do Internet based research. The main findings from the study show that the dramatic growth predicted by industry commentators is not evident among practising market researchers. Internet research is tending to be used for specialist types of research study such as Web site evaluation, business to business and employee research, where the audience is more likely to be online, or are part of an easily accessible database list supplied by clients. The research also found continuing concern about sample frames, attrition of panel members and response rates. Many in the industry are still undecided on the likely problems and opportunities associated with Internet research. There needs to be far more research and development if Internet based research is to become a serious alternative to traditional research methods.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

John A. Schibrowsky, James W. Peltier and Alexander Nill

The purpose of this study is to examine the internet marketing literature to determine how internet marketing research has evolved in terms of quantity, content, and…

Downloads
13868

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the internet marketing literature to determine how internet marketing research has evolved in terms of quantity, content, and publication outlets. In addition, the paper identifies important trends in the internet marketing literature and provides a view of the research gaps and expected topical areas of interest.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis was performed on approximately 1,400 internet‐related marketing articles identified by searching the ABI/INFORM database. A total of 902 peer‐reviewed internet marketing articles appearing in nearly 80 different journals were identified. The study revealed that 60 percent of the internet research had been published in the last three years. The three most researched internet marketing areas were consumer behavior, internet strategy, and internet communications. The topics with the highest growth over the past two years were research issues and consumer search. Over the past 15 years, 14 articles appeared in the top three marketing journals.

Findings

The article identified important trends in the internet marketing research to provide future direction, particularly in terms of research gaps and expected topical areas of interest. The three major research areas that are likely to grow in the next few years are: consumer trust pertaining to the internet, the use of the internet by consumers for marketing related activities, and where is the internet headed in terms of integrating strategies?

Originality/value

The study provides both academics and practitioners with an updated review of the internet marketing literature along with a sense of how internet marketing research is evolving.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Martin Lohmann and Dirk J. Schmücker

Online data collection is gaining momentum throughout the market research business. At the same time internet users and their online information and booking behaviour are…

Downloads
2125

Abstract

Purpose

Online data collection is gaining momentum throughout the market research business. At the same time internet users and their online information and booking behaviour are becoming more and more important for the travel and tourism industry. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper researches internet users' travel and information/booking behaviour through online surveys. However, this approach is prone to critical methodological limitations. One of the main issues in this respect is the question of proper definition of the universe and sampling procedures. The paper shows today's chances and limitations of sampling using list‐based e‐mail invitations and online access panels.

Findings

Results indicate that sampling method and length of field time have a substantial influence on response rates. It can further be shown that results from online travel research differ from results obtained in face‐to‐face interviews even when focussing on the same target group.

Research implications

As long as online research differs from research on internet users to such an extent, online surveys seem to be rather a good complement than a substitution for more traditional research methods.

Originality/value

The paper shows the limitations and chances of online travel research based on the unique comparison of data from a face‐to‐face and online access panel surveys.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
15672

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Downloads
13793

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
13248

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Sharinne Crawford, Stacey Hokke, Jan M. Nicholson, Lawrie Zion, Jayne Lucke, Patrick Keyzer and Naomi Hackworth

The internet offers an opportunity for researchers to engage participants in research in a cost-effective and timely manner. Yet the use of the internet as a research tool…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet offers an opportunity for researchers to engage participants in research in a cost-effective and timely manner. Yet the use of the internet as a research tool (internet research) comes with a range of ethical concerns, and the rapidly changing online environment poses challenges for both researchers and ethics committees. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key ethical issues of using the internet to recruit, retain and trace participants in public health research, from the perspectives of researchers and human research ethics committee (HREC) members.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with eight public health researchers and seven HREC members in Australia to explore the key ethical issues of using the internet to engage research participants.

Findings

The study identified commonalities between researchers and HREC members regarding the utility and ethical complexity of using the internet to recruit, retain and trace research participants. The need for guidance and support regarding internet research, for both groups, was highlighted, as well as the need for flexibility and responsiveness in formal ethical processes.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the understanding of how the internet is used to engage participants in public health research and the ethical context in which that occurs. Supporting the ethical conduct of internet research will benefit those involved in research, including researchers, HRECs, organisations and research participants.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Alice Moseley

This paper argues that staff in the caring professions wishing to use research evidence to inform their practice cannot afford to ignore the Internet, since it is far and…

Abstract

This paper argues that staff in the caring professions wishing to use research evidence to inform their practice cannot afford to ignore the Internet, since it is far and away the best means of access to evidence there is. It also provides a description of and rationale for evidence‐based practice, and highlights the benefits of the Internet using examples of currently available research resources. However, the existing evidence from the social care field indicates poor levels of access to the Internet and other electronic research resources. The implications of this are discussed. It is suggested that appropriate training and support must be provided alongside better Internet access. The paper is set in the context of government initiatives encouraging e‐government.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Charles Obiora Omekwu

The central objective of this work is to examine internet sources, resources, and strategies, with particular reference to legal research.

Downloads
1251

Abstract

Purpose

The central objective of this work is to examine internet sources, resources, and strategies, with particular reference to legal research.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted was to preface web‐based definitions of the internet and draw some features from the definitions. The next approach was to examine legal research resources on the internet. A web‐based survey and subject analysis of legal resources was then conducted.

Findings

The findings reveal the existence of diverse web resources on all subjects of law.

Research limitations/implications

Draws implications for legal research based on empirical data presented. Internet legal research is not simplistic; nor are all the web‐accessed materials to be accepted hook, line and sinker. It is, however, critical to state that to a large extent the internet would continue to create distributed research community for scholarship and research on a global basis. It concludes that, for legal research institutions, the need to install IT‐driven legal research facilities is no longer at the crossroads of policy tinkering but at the threshold of fundamental technological shift. Internet connectivity is the most critical need of legal research institutions of developing countries.

Originality/value

Probably a first in emphasizing unequivocally that IT activity and expertise are an absolute necessity for the pursuit of legal research in the future.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Clive Nancarrow, John Pallister and Ian Brace

The increasing use of Internet‐based qualitative and quantitative research is based on both “pull” and “push” factors. “Pull” factors include research clients’ demand for…

Downloads
6518

Abstract

The increasing use of Internet‐based qualitative and quantitative research is based on both “pull” and “push” factors. “Pull” factors include research clients’ demand for faster turnaround and low cost, while marketing research agencies’ naturally competitive endeavours represent the “push”. Attempts “to clear the e‐mist” regarding research on the Internet and examines the main types of Internet based research (qualitative and quantitative) as well as seven “sins” for Internet researchers – based on interviews with leading providers of Internet market research and IT specialists. Concludes that there is a need for both practitioners and academics to ensure their houses are kept in order and to respect the rights of respondents and clients and, just as importantly, be seen to be doing this and so keep possible interference by governments at bay.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 71000