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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

P.L. Joshi and Jawaher Al‐Modhahki

In this paper, we examine the factors that are likely to explain the use of the internet as a vehicle for voluntary financial reporting by companies in Bahrain and Kuwait…

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the factors that are likely to explain the use of the internet as a vehicle for voluntary financial reporting by companies in Bahrain and Kuwait. A total of 75 companies (Kuwait 42 and Bahrain 33) were investigated to find out if they had websites and presented their financial statements on the internet. For Kuwait, 47.6% and for Bahrain 48.5% of sample companies had their own websites. Six variables were tested to examine their influence on the financial reporting by companies on the internet. A discriminant analysis was performed on the data and the results indicated that size (log of total assets) and industry were the main factors which influenced the financial reporting practices of companies on the internet. These results are in line with prior evidence. There is some indication that risk may also contribute to some extent in such decision. Perceptions of advantages and problems in using this new technology for financial reporting were also examined. It appears that the usage of this technology is still limited and slow in this part of the world, perhaps because of cultural dimensions and constraints.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Faisal S. Alanezi

The purpose of this study is to investigate empirically factors influencing Kuwaiti companies to disseminate their financial reports on the Internet. A regression model is…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate empirically factors influencing Kuwaiti companies to disseminate their financial reports on the Internet. A regression model is estimated using logit analysis for a sample of 179 Kuwaiti companies listed on the Kuwait Stock Exchange for 2007 to test the hypotheses of the study. The study’s results indicate that an Internet financial report is significantly influenced by the auditor type, company size and industry type. The results, however, do not provide evidence of a significant relation between Internet financial reports and any of the corporate governance attributes that were examined in this study.

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Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Farzaneh Nassir Zadeh, Mahdi Salehi and Haneyeh Shabestari

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the ownership of institutional shareholders, the proportion of non-executive members, the percentage of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the ownership of institutional shareholders, the proportion of non-executive members, the percentage of ownership of major shareholders, the duality of the tasks of chief executive officer and chairman of the board of director, financial leverage, the amount of the remuneration of the board of director, the company’s life and the amount of export on internet financial reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, the authors surveyed the 301 listed companies on Tehran Stock Exchange in 2015. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis of the study was cross-sectional data.

Findings

The results indicate the negative impact of ratio of non-executive members and the positive impact of financial leverage, size, liquidity and the life of the company in stock, over internet financial reporting.

Originality/value

The current study is almost the first study which is conducted in a developing country, and the results may helpful to the other developing nations.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

K. Barac

The inherent nature of the Internet affects financial reporting in the sense that information on a website is available to anyone, anywhere and at any time. Financial

Abstract

The inherent nature of the Internet affects financial reporting in the sense that information on a website is available to anyone, anywhere and at any time. Financial reporting on the Internet reduces the cost of financial reporting, makes instantaneous reporting a reality, adds breadth and depth to business reporting, allows analytical tools to be used on underlying business data and makes it easier to disseminate reports to any place in the world where there is a computer. A cursory exploration of financial reporting on the websites of South African companies reveals great variations in terms of the amount of content (e.g. summary financial statements vs detailed financial statements), the style of presentation (e.g. similar to paper‐based reports vs inclusion of multi‐media) and the manner in which companies incorporate navigation aids (e.g. hyperlinks, search boxes and others). The advantages of the Internet as a new mode of information dissemination are clear, but Internet financial reporting creates a number of challenges for companies and their auditors as well as for regulatory and standard‐setting organisations. This paper assesses Internet reporting in South Africa. It explores the manner in which financial and certain non‐financial information is presented on companies’ websites and determine whether reporting practices on the websites of South African companies differ fromthose of their international counterparts. The study revealed that although Internet usage in South Africa has expanded as a medium for presentation of financial information via companies’ websites, top South African companies use their websites as a bulletin board with limited real‐time financial information and note disclaimers.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

K. Barac

This paper examines international pronouncements on the audit function and Internet financial reporting and assesses whether the practices and policies reflected in these…

Abstract

This paper examines international pronouncements on the audit function and Internet financial reporting and assesses whether the practices and policies reflected in these pronouncements are followed by the auditors of top South African companies. As a secondary objective, this study also attempted to determine how South African auditors perceive the influence that Internet reporting may have on the auditing profession in future. The analysis shows that many of the procedures required of auditors and Internet reporting have already been defined by international standardsetting bodies, but that the audit firms which responded to the questionnaire in this study do not yet have well‐established policies and practices regarding Internet reporting. There is still some uncertainty regarding Internet financial reporting in the responding audit firms, as was reflected in their perceptions of the future of Internet financial reporting and its impact on the audit function. The responding audit firms were reluctant to expand their responsibilities with regard to Internet financial reporting.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Alan K. Styles and Mack Tennyson

In recent years accounting standard setters and professional bodies have issued directives aimed at improving the transparency and accessibility of financial reports

Abstract

In recent years accounting standard setters and professional bodies have issued directives aimed at improving the transparency and accessibility of financial reports compiled by government agencies. This study examines the availability and accessibility of local government financial reports on the Internet for a sample of 300 U.S. municipalities of varying size. Results indicate that provision of financial reports is more prominent among larger cities. Cities with higher income per capita and higher levels of accounting disclosure are also more likely to provide financial reports on the Internet. The accessibility of the financial data reported on the Internet is positively related to the number of residents, resident income per capita, and level of debt and financial position of the municipality.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Mohammad Nurunnabi and Monirul Alam Hossain

The present study seeks to paint the current state of voluntary disclosure of internet financial reporting (IFR) in Bangladesh as an example of an emerging economy and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study seeks to paint the current state of voluntary disclosure of internet financial reporting (IFR) in Bangladesh as an example of an emerging economy and to investigate empirically some company characteristics as determinants of such practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 83 listed companies in Bangladesh in the year 2009 and the disclosure index of Deller et al., Marston, Xiao et al. and Marston and Polei and comments from the users and investors of Bangladesh, the study employs statistical analysis to investigate the association between a number of company characteristics and the extent of voluntary disclosure of IFR.

Findings

The findings revealed that only 29.12 percent (83) companies had web sites out of the 285 listed companies and only 33.34 percent (28) companies' provided financial information. Out of seven variables, only big audit firms and non‐family ownership variables were significantly associated with the levels of voluntary disclosure. Another important result revealed that despite the mandatory requirements of having audit committee in Bangladesh, the companies without the audit committee were disclosing voluntary information more and it raised the question on the lack of regulatory enforcement in Bangladesh.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study is limited to a single country; it would be interesting to replicate this study to a group of emerging countries which have many similarities to the Bangladesh environment.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, no studies have been conducted on IFR in a South Asian emerging country, in particular Bangladesh. The study also is the first of its kind to examine the whole population of a period in any country which enhances contribution to IFR literature. Unlike the prior studies conducted in emerging countries, the study contributes not only to the present state of IFR by the listed companies in Bangladesh but also the connectivity problem between the dream and reality of the digital Bangladesh concept. The study also finds that the companies' IFR practices are not influenced by “Digital Bangladesh” concept.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Sabri Boubaker, Faten Lakhal and Mehdi Nekhili

The purpose of this paper is to consider the determinants of web‐based corporate reporting by French‐listed firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the determinants of web‐based corporate reporting by French‐listed firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature review of the determinants of web‐based corporate disclosures and is both descriptive and explicative. It analyzes the use of the internet to disseminate corporate information and examines the extent of web‐based corporate disclosure by developing a set of disclosure indexes. To test the authors' hypotheses, an OLS regression framework was estimated on a sample of 529 French‐listed firms in 2005.

Findings

Descriptive analysis shows that French firms are using the internet to disseminate existing rather than timely information. The results show that large‐sized firms, large‐audited firms, firms featuring a dispersed ownership structure, those that have issued bonds or equities and IT industry firms extensively used the web to disclose information to their shareholders. The results also show that voluntary disclosures are more suited for the internet than mandatory disclosures.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not cover all information provided on web sites, particularly those about the impact of IFRS on companies' accounts.

Practical implications

The findings are useful to both managers, wishing to meet actual and potential investors' informational needs and to investors wishing to invest in a richer informational environment and to better assess firm value.

Originality/value

This paper provides a better understanding of the choice of the internet to release information in the French context, where internet corporate reporting is not standardized as in the USA and Canada.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Catherine Gowthorpe

So far, there has been little research on the extent or implications of corporate reporting on the Internet. This paper identifies the type of work which has been done to…

Abstract

So far, there has been little research on the extent or implications of corporate reporting on the Internet. This paper identifies the type of work which has been done to date in this new field, and proceeds to outline some possible areas and questions for future research work. The discussion falls into the five following principal areas: Corporate governance, and the nature of the stakeholder/company relationship; The company’s viewpoint: incentives and disincentives for expanded financial reporting; Verification: the changing role of audit; Information/communication issues; Ethical, behavioural and philosophical aspects.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Yi Xiang and Jacqueline L. Birt

This paper aims to investigate internet reporting and social media strategies by Australian firms. This study looks at the extent of internet reporting and considers firm…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate internet reporting and social media strategies by Australian firms. This study looks at the extent of internet reporting and considers firm characteristics associated with disclosing information on the internet. This research is timely as in the past decade, this paper has witnessed the rapid growth of technologies such as the internet and social media and their subsequent impact on business and the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper constructs a disclosure index featuring a wide range of both financial and non-financial disclosures including social media strategy. This study then investigates the firm characteristics associated with the level of internet disclosure.

Findings

This paper finds that a firm’s internet reporting is associated with firm size, financial performance and analysts’ coverage but not associated with the percentage of independent board members. A firm’s social media strategy is associated with firm size and its environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) ranking.

Practical implications

The findings can help firms improve their internet reporting disclosures by providing a comprehensive list of disclosures that could benefit users of financial reports. It also helps standard setters and regulators understand some of the firm factors related to internet reporting and provide guidance for standard setters to consider in developing best practice internet reporting standards.

Originality/value

The research features the top 100 Australian companies’ internet disclosures in 2018 and also includes social media strategy. The results highlight that there is room for improvement with firms’ internet disclosure. By constructing a comprehensive index, this study provides guidance for standard setters to consider in developing best practice internet reporting standards.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

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