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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Yulia Tyurina, Mariya Troyanskaya, Lilia Ermolina, Aleksei V. Bogoviz and Svetlana Lobova

The purpose of this paper is to determine the possibilities and barriers of the practical application of internationally recognized diplomas of higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the possibilities and barriers of the practical application of internationally recognized diplomas of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used SWOT analysis for determining preconditions and barriers as well as possibilities and threats that are related to the provision and practical application of internationally recognized diplomas of higher education and the method of modeling of socio-economic processes and systems for compiling a conceptual model of the provision and practical application of internationally recognized diplomas of higher education. Demand for the practical application of internationally recognized diplomas in modern Russia is determined with the method of analysis of statistical data (method of economic statistics). The information and analytical basis of the research consists of materials of the Federal State Statistics Service of the Russian Federation.

Findings

It is shown by the example of modern Russia that the practical application of internationally recognized diplomas is popular, and universities that provide remote education possess wide possibilities in the sphere of their provision, as they are characterized by high flexibility that allows them to adapt to the international standards of university education. The barriers of the practical application of internationally recognized diplomas of higher education are caused by the lack of clear and generally recognized international standards of university education, absence of entrepreneurial culture of application of internationally recognized diplomas and absence of international organization that certifies activities of universities and issues licenses for internationally recognized diplomas.

Originality/value

In order to overcome these barriers, the authors created a conceptual model of the provision and practical application of internationally recognized diplomas of higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Patrick Love

The boom in online products and services is radically changing many aspects of both the economy and everyday life, and will increasingly affect individuals’ learning…

Abstract

The boom in online products and services is radically changing many aspects of both the economy and everyday life, and will increasingly affect individuals’ learning needs. This article examines how education systems see their role in the “new economy”, and the means by which they can prepare students for the new tasks, challenges and opportunities they will encounter, while still having to cope with the constraints and contradictions affecting how they operate today.

Details

Foresight, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

W.H. Smith and Oxford Polytechnic have set up a new agreement which is likely to transform the way in which UK managers gain professional management qualifications. The…

Abstract

W.H. Smith and Oxford Polytechnic have set up a new agreement which is likely to transform the way in which UK managers gain professional management qualifications. The initiative has come from W.H. Smith, which proposes a new kind of partnership between business and higher education in Britain. Peter Bagnall, Managing Director, Staff and Services, said:

Details

Education + Training, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Content available

Abstract

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Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Iryna Kushnir

Policy instruments are specific policies – policy content, which is associated not just with policy texts, but also with how they are negotiated and practised (Dolowitz &…

Abstract

Policy instruments are specific policies – policy content, which is associated not just with policy texts, but also with how they are negotiated and practised (Dolowitz & Marsh, 2000; Fimyar, 2008). In the context of Bologna, policy instruments are Bologna action lines (such as the credit system, the study cycles, etc.).

This Chapter explains the development of the Bologna instruments in Ukraine until 2014 through the interaction of the policy continuity and change. In particular, I review how the development of the Bologna instruments in Ukraine was triggered and guided by the Bologna action lines, as well as by the old national higher education policies. I look at the cases of four Bologna instruments. They are the system of credits, the study cycles, the diploma supplement and quality assurance. All of these instruments have been developed through the reconfiguration of the pre-Bologna policies, which were chosen by the Ministry to represent these instruments. Namely, the national module system became the basis for the Bologna system of credits. The pre-Bologna education-qualification and scientific cycles made a foundation for the Bologna study cycles. The old national diploma supplement was a reason for the delay in dealing with the Bologna diploma supplement, given that a diploma supplement existed. The national diploma supplement was taken as the Bologna instrument even though their structure and content differed. Apart from this, the pre-Bologna higher education quality assurance policies started representing the Bologna quality assurance instruments at the outset of the reform in Ukraine.

The examination of these four cases of policy instruments shows that their development began with a mere change of labels for the old policies and proceeded with building up innovations to gradually alter the old national higher education policies.

Details

The Bologna Reform in Ukraine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-114-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

E.P. Hibbert

This article explains how effective training and education in sales and marketing has been developed by the Institute of Marketing in the UK. This is primarily offered as…

Abstract

This article explains how effective training and education in sales and marketing has been developed by the Institute of Marketing in the UK. This is primarily offered as a service to British industry to improve competitiveness and performance. It also explains how the Institute helps to develop personal professionalism and career planning by offering an internationally recognised qualification — the Diploma in Marketing. Reference is made to current economic and trading prospects and the implications for designing and delivering education and training programmes, and the contribution that the marketing “professional” can make to the profitable development of a business. The article emphasises that “professionalism” must be based first on successful experience and second on gaining an approved marketing qualification.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2018

Maya Cranitch and Duncan MacLaren

The Thai–Burma refugee program of Australian Catholic University (ACU) brings young Burmese refugees from camps in Thailand to an internet-equipped teaching center to…

Abstract

The Thai–Burma refugee program of Australian Catholic University (ACU) brings young Burmese refugees from camps in Thailand to an internet-equipped teaching center to study for a Diploma in Liberal Studies. Some of the learning is carried out online and some in face-to-face mode provided by ACU or partner universities.

The authors detail the methodologies followed, combining sound pedagogy with an integral human development approach. This changed the students’ mode of learning from rote to critical thinking which, in turn, improved their self-confidence, gave them a good ethical and culturally acceptable grounding and provided them with fluency in oral and written academic English. In addition, the authors recount the many challenges faced by bringing together students from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds with all the baggage brought from a conflict ridden and divided country emerging out of decades of dictatorship.

The program’s results have been remarkable. Many students have found high-quality employment after graduating, especially with non-governmental organizations on the border or in Burma or in some other job serving the needs of their own people. Others have used the Diploma to go on to full degree courses in a number of countries in Asia, North America, and Europe.

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Case study
Publication date: 5 October 2019

Fatma Mohammed Al Badi and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

Strategic management, operation management, health and safety

Abstract

Subject Area

Strategic management, operation management, health and safety

Study Level/Applicability

The authors have been developed the case to be applied for a diploma, undergraduate students and it might help the students in the postgraduate. The case is appropriate for courses in the area of strategic management, operation management and health and safety.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the importance of animal disease prevention and the correct procedures for dealing with disease outbreaks in an animal facility; to reinforce the importance of adherence to strict procedures and chain of command by Life Sciences and Conservation sections in preserving the health of animals, zoo staff and visitors; to recognize the importance of disease monitoring and control in wildlife conservation; and to understand the importance of concrete experience in related positions to provide leaders like Director Mark Craig with the skills to handle such a big responsibility. Al Ain Zoo has such leaders along with a dedicated and resourceful management team that has proven capable of placing the institution among the best conservation parks in the world.

Case overview/synopsis

Large collections of animals of diverse species found in zoos and animal parks present a considerable challenge to facility managers in developing and implementing programs to prevent and control the spread of animal diseases. One need to only think about the nightmare consequences of an illness that could decimate a population of animals in a public setting such as a zoo and, in a worst-case scenario, spread to staff, visitors and even the public at large. Biologists have clearly shown how certain types of animals can act as reservoirs for disease viruses, for example, chimpanzees harboring the simian immunodeficiency virus that mutated to HIV or chickens and ducks spreading avian influenza virus to poultry workers and then to the public. Thus, disease control in zoos is an issue of the utmost importance, and managers and operators neglect it at their peril. The reputation and indeed the very existence of an animal park rests in the hands of a dedicated group of managers, veterinarians and technical staff, as well as zoo workers who must strictly follow procedures to prevent and contain animal-borne diseases. This case study focuses on the work of one man in a large internationally known facility to develop, implement, test and evaluate an innovative program for animal disease control. So, what would you do if you were the director of a large metropolitan zoo and your staff veterinarian came to you and said that there was an outbreak of a serious viral disease among a group of animals? Could you have prevented the disease? How will you treat the sick animals and stop the disease from spreading? Is there a risk of the zoo staff contracting the disease from handling sick animals? What about zoo visitors? These are all questions that are addressed in this new and intriguing case study focused on managing animal diseases in the setting of a zoo or wildlife park. Mark Craig, Director of Life Sciences at the Al Ain Zoo in the United Arab Emirates, has plenty to say about the planning, science and management skills necessary to insure that a large population of diverse wild animals remains healthy and thriving. The Al Ain Zoo is the largest of its kind in the Middle East, and while he has been in charge of the animal welfare program for more than six years, there have been few incidents of disease and all have been contained. What can be learned from his effective strategies and leadership skills is clearly discussed and illustrated in this unique real-world case study.

Complexity academic level

The authors have developed the case to be applied for a diploma, undergraduate students and it might help the students in the postgraduate. The case is appropriate for courses in the area of strategic management, operation management and health and safety.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available upon request for educators only. These teaching notes should be shared solely with the instructor and students should not have access to. Please contact your library to gain login or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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