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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Annette Aagaard Thuesen and Eva Mærsk

Esbjerg is located in the Wadden Sea region and is a regional centre with approximately 72,000 inhabitants. Commercially, the city has recently ranked first amongst major…

Abstract

Esbjerg is located in the Wadden Sea region and is a regional centre with approximately 72,000 inhabitants. Commercially, the city has recently ranked first amongst major Danish cities in the creation of jobs. However, in Denmark, it is mainly other cities that attract younger students, and Esbjerg has some of the same structural problems due to outmigration as Danish rural areas in general. It is, therefore, important for Esbjerg to be able to attract international students so that businesses and institutions in the region can recruit skilled employees. In this book chapter, the authors aim to reanalyse data from 10 semi-structured interviews with international students at higher education institutions in Esbjerg conducted in 2016. The authors position their empirical findings within the literature on international student integration to investigate the obstacles to international student integration into study, business and leisure life in Esbjerg and potential solutions given Esbjerg’s peripheral location. The chapter, thus, aims to improve the understanding of cultural, work-related and everyday life challenges that are present in university town environments where international students study, mainly from the perspective of students.

Details

Global Perspectives on Recruiting International Students: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-518-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Tara Madden-Dent

As high school and college graduates enter today's highly competitive and diverse, globalized economies, cultural competence and social and emotional learning (SEL…

Abstract

As high school and college graduates enter today's highly competitive and diverse, globalized economies, cultural competence and social and emotional learning (SEL) competencies continue being essential skills for college, career, and life success. These capabilities are more than valuable assets, they are employability requirements in a modern workforce dependent on navigating relationships and interactions between people from different backgrounds. In education, educators are increasingly expected to cultivate these skills within equitable learning environments for all students, international and domestic. Recent research demonstrates greater need to support international students in the United States who often experience unique academic barriers, stressors, and lack of support services for managing international relocation and integration into unfamiliar academic and cultural systems. To better understand how culturally responsive SEL education can serve as a lever for increasing equitable conditions for international students and to contribute research-based practices on how distance learning can strengthen culturally responsive SEL skills, the following chapter introduces how one online academic and cultural studies course influenced high school and undergraduate international students. Through qualitative and quantitative sources (e.g., written homework reflections; cultural orientation indicator (COI) report; paper: My Action Plan; course evaluation survey), themes emerged from the data that identified how explicit online SEL education, using a culturally responsive lens, contributed to gains in cultural competence, educational equity, academic and professional development, and self-efficacy.

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Arthur Galamba

The author is interested in how international (migrant) pre-service teachers use their educational background knowledge and worldviews to make sense of the educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The author is interested in how international (migrant) pre-service teachers use their educational background knowledge and worldviews to make sense of the educational system, the pedagogy and of power relations between staff members in the hosting country. The author seeks to unveil their understanding of successful intellectual integration and their strategies to navigate social, conceptual and pedagogical obstacles.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws on the concept of “intercultural competence” to analyse how international STEM pre-service teachers respond to the challenges and opportunities of integration in the English system. A total of 18 participants were interviewed in focus groups in London to find out about their perceptions of the course and attitudes during their training journey. Five hours of audio recording were transcribed and a thematic analysis was carried out.

Findings

International STEM pre-service teachers experience challenges to intellectual integration, including understanding the new school culture, school structure, teaching methodologies and the use of specialist terminologies. However, they show little concern about networking and relations of power.

Practical implications

Mentors and tutors should not assume school systems are the same everywhere. Support from university tutors and school mentors must take into consideration that international students will very likely hold ethnocentric views. Mentors, tutors and pre-service teachers would benefit very much from bespoke support to help international students to integrate in a new educational system.

Originality/value

Very little has been reported on the experience of international STEM pre-service teachers in England, particularly those with no previous teaching experience. The objective of this study is to address this gap and contribute to the internationalisation of teacher training curricula.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Anthony Lising Antonio and Chanwoong Baek

Although a student’s sense of belonging is a key factor of persistence in higher education, research on international students’ belonging tends to rely on domain-agnostic…

Abstract

Purpose

Although a student’s sense of belonging is a key factor of persistence in higher education, research on international students’ belonging tends to rely on domain-agnostic survey measures and promote interpretations that focus mainly on social integration and adjustment. This paper aims to examine how male international graduate students in engineering understand and describe their sense of belonging and how they perceive its development at their institution.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 12 male electrical engineering doctoral students at a selective research university in the USA. This interpretive approach allowed students to articulate their subjective understanding of belonging within a specific disciplinary context.

Findings

Contrary to the broad notion that the social domain is the primary locus of students’ sense of belonging, participants emphasized the academic domain when referring to their struggles with, and attempts to develop, a sense of belonging. Results suggest that the meritocratic culture of engineering education may influence students to prioritize the academic domain when conceptualizing and developing their belonging. Moreover, the strong academic motivation endemic to international students pursuing graduate education at a top American research university intensified this mechanism.

Originality/value

This study argues that universities seeking to enhance international graduate students’ sense of belonging can be more intentional in providing opportunities for students to establish positive academic identities. Furthermore, addressing students’ non-academic identity and marginalization as relevant and essential topics in engineering will expand their understanding of what means to belong.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2010

Jane Burdett and Joanna Crossman

Growing numbers of international students on Australian university campuses in the last decade have generated interest, change and quality challenges. Research suggests…

Abstract

Purpose

Growing numbers of international students on Australian university campuses in the last decade have generated interest, change and quality challenges. Research suggests that the future success of Australian universities rests on their ability to meet the challenge of providing a stimulating and rewarding higher education experience for domestic and international students alike. The Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) has sought, through its second round of quality reviews, to focus on the performance of Australian universities with regard to international activities. Specifically, this paper seeks to establish the “pulse” in relation to the issues and strategies aimed at the social engagement of international students as part of their wider experience on campus.

Design/methodology/approach

A thematic analysis approach was adopted to explore “internationalisation” in 14 AUQA audit reports published between 2006 and 2010.

Findings

The findings of the study have led to first, the development of a definition of social engagement as an aspect of the international student experience. Second, they identify the key contexts targeted by universities as being relevant to the social engagement of international students. Third, the findings focus on the strategies adopted by universities in enhancing social engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Observations of AUQA university reports point to the need for further research concerned with student engagement with communities beyond the campus and also to explore online software as a tool for social engagement. One limitation of the study lies in the fact that, whilst many university reports allude to student experience questionnaires, the voice of international students in describing their own social experiences is not emphasised.

Originality/value

Together with a focus on social engagement from the student's own point‐of‐view, the findings of this study are likely to be a useful resource for university staff considering the contexts in which the social engagement of international students is targeted and the strategies they adopt.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 3 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Janet M. Howes

International students face challenges when they attend a university outside their home country. Some of those challenges can be language barriers, expectations of…

Abstract

International students face challenges when they attend a university outside their home country. Some of those challenges can be language barriers, expectations of professors, university rules and living situation. All of these can add strain to an already stressful situation of studying abroad. Student integration into a local society can offset some of the anxiety of studying overseas (Mattis, 2019). Students who have made friends are comfortable living within the locale in which they are studying and have reported more satisfaction than those students who have not integrated into a local society (Fischer, 2012). This chapter will study the ways in which students should work to integrate themselves into the local society and how the university and professors can help international students find a way to become familiar and content within the local society. Learning the regional language, culture and social activities help enhance the student’s satisfaction.

Details

Global Perspectives on Recruiting International Students: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-518-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Yimeng Zhang

As the development of internationalisation in higher education, the mobility of international students around the world has been more active than ever. Chinese…

Abstract

As the development of internationalisation in higher education, the mobility of international students around the world has been more active than ever. Chinese international student community is growing larger and larger in the popular destination countries like the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada. Cultures vary from east to west; Chinese students might find it difficult to adjust in a new cultural environment. When international Chinese students are struggling with cultural adjustment issues, they might have difficulties finding the support that they need, as schools might not have culturally relevant international students support service. Using an exploratory case study approach, the researcher intends to investigate some uncommon issues that Chinese undergraduate students were facing in their cultural experience in the United Kingdom. This research is aimed to raise the awareness for institutions to supply more through international students support service to reach a higher level of students’ satisfaction.

Details

Global Perspectives on Recruiting International Students: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-518-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Helen Vosper

Educational development is increasingly focussed on quality assurance and enhancement. Individual states/countries have their own mechanisms for assuring the student

Abstract

Educational development is increasingly focussed on quality assurance and enhancement. Individual states/countries have their own mechanisms for assuring the student experience, and this has been accompanied by development of tools (including the UK’s National Student Survey) for capturing student opinion of our efforts. Areas where more work is needed include equity and diversity and it is perhaps time for a fresh approach. In other sectors, International Standards ensure safety, reliability and quality of products and services. Such standards also represent a stakeholder-negotiated (and therefore shared) understanding of ‘good quality’, supporting organisations in accessing new markets and permitting a fair global trade, an approach relevant to higher education. Recent publication of ISO (The International Organization for Standardization) Standard 27500 (the International Standard describing the principles and rationales behind becoming a human-centred organization) seems timely. Encouraging educational institutions to adopt this Standard may offer a strategy for addressing several issues, including internationalisation.

Details

Strategies for Fostering Inclusive Classrooms in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-061-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Jane Burdett and Joanna Crossman

Australia has enjoyed two decades of growth in international student enrolments. This phenomenon, combined with the evolution of quality assurance policy frameworks, has…

3677

Abstract

Purpose

Australia has enjoyed two decades of growth in international student enrolments. This phenomenon, combined with the evolution of quality assurance policy frameworks, has stimulated interest in the social and academic experiences of international students and their educational outcomes. The Australian Universities Quality Agency's (AUQA) second round of quality audits assessed and reported on the performance of Australian universities in the area of “internationalisation”. AUQA findings and recommendations for required action send powerful messages to guide university priorities, practices and strategies in pursuit of quality enhancement in relation to student engagement. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a thematic analysis approach to explore “internationalisation” in 14 AUQA audit reports published between 2006 and 2010.

Findings

This paper identifies three key areas arising from AUQA audit reports that form a basis for discussion in this paper. These areas are: the social and academic engagement of both international and local students, and matters relating to English language standards and support. Observations arising from AUQA university reports direct attention to examples of initiatives that appear to be enriching the quality of the student engagement and indicate where further development may be required.

Practical implications

In seeking strategies for enhanced student experience, AUQA supports collaboration across universities in devising models for identifying student needs and creating mechanisms that bring about quality student experience, engagement and language outcomes. This analysis of the reports will likely assist those stakeholders working in universities who wish to identify successful approaches to promote the engagement of international students and refine existing useful and positive strategies in implementing and developing ideas in their own individual university contexts.

Originality/value

Analysis of the substantial text of AUQA reports have been underexploited by researchers to date. This paper is likely to be of interest to those stakeholders of international education in universities, not only in Australia but in other national contexts where international students are significantly represented.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Radu Daniel Prelipcean, Mir Nazmul Islam, Andrea Peebles, Thomas Barakat and Jianming Yao

This chapter presents a comparative perspective on international education in Canada and Australia in the light of recent federal proposals for improving international

Abstract

This chapter presents a comparative perspective on international education in Canada and Australia in the light of recent federal proposals for improving international education programs. The study provides an account of the multiple benefits of international education and introduces the concept of public sector entrepreneurship (PSE) as a necessity for creating and administering comprehensive programs, aimed at increasing Canada’s share of the international education market. The chapter compares Canadian and Australian international education policies with a special emphasis on the entrepreneurial approach applied in Australia. Moreover, the chapter discusses potential contributions to Canadian human capital through attractive immigration policies for international graduates. The findings reveal that Canada needs centralized management of international education programs. Following the Australian model, the establishment of a specialized agency to administer programs at federal level and to coordinate activities at provincial level is essential for success. PSE is represented by applying a market approach and revising residency and immigration strategies. Further research is required for a more detailed analysis of the costs and benefits of necessary capital investments and implications of changing the policy framework governing skilled migration.

Details

International Educational Innovation and Public Sector Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-708-5

Keywords

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