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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2006

Prescott C. Ensign

This paper presents a systematic method for classifying research on international channels of distribution. It is used to examine 79 articles published during an 18‐year…

Abstract

This paper presents a systematic method for classifying research on international channels of distribution. It is used to examine 79 articles published during an 18‐year period (1988‐2005). Based on content analysis, each article is classified by its primary research framework. Two frameworks are identified: (1) structural ‐ based on the economic and organizational aspects of international channels of distribution; and (2) behavioral ‐ based on the exchange relationship between channel members from different national environments. This simple organizing system offers a comprehensive way to analyze scholarship that has emerged in the field. For managers, it can bring the theoretical and practical developments together in an understandable fashion as they seek to interpret and apply research findings. For scholars, it may bring focus to an increasingly complex area of international business and guide future research efforts.

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Multinational Business Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Yongkyu Kim

When an international firm enters an overseas market, international distribution channel structure is very important. Distribution channel structures decisions are made by…

Abstract

When an international firm enters an overseas market, international distribution channel structure is very important. Distribution channel structures decisions are made by examining the company’s degree of commitment and risk, and are not only difficult to change but initial wrong decisions may lead to poor results. Therefore, channel satisfaction is higher when channel structure is appropriate for the foreign market. Examines factors leading to a firm’s satisfaction with international marketing channels. Builds on existing studies about consumer satisfaction and distribution channel structures. As theoretical background, a transaction cost factor and the discrepancy model is used to examine the determinants of satisfaction. Findings from a survey of Korean electronic export corporations show that a firm’s relative performance and control variables provide significant explanations for channel satisfaction, and the channel structure variable is supported by null hypothesis.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Ko de Ruyter, Martin Wetzels and Jos Lemmink

States that providing quality customer service is increasingly regarded as an important basis for establishing and maintaining solid and long‐term relationships between…

Abstract

States that providing quality customer service is increasingly regarded as an important basis for establishing and maintaining solid and long‐term relationships between manufacturers and distributors in marketing channels. Discusses the results of a research project which was undertaken to study the relationship between perceived service quality, supplier power bases and perceived relationship strength in international marketing channels. Finds that two dimensions can be used for characterizing perceived service quality in international marketing channels: service elements controlled by intermediary personnel; and service elements controlled by management. Moreover reveals that perceived service quality is an important determinant of perceived relationship strength, in contrast to coercive power bases such as offering rewards or undertaking punitive action. Concludes that, particularly in long channel structures, perceived service quality forms an important marketing channel instrument for relationship marketing.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 30 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2003

Michael R Mullen, C.M Sashi and Patricia M Doney

Market entry strategies range from foreign direct investment to licensing with varying levels of commitment, risk and opportunity. Exporting products or services is one of…

Abstract

Market entry strategies range from foreign direct investment to licensing with varying levels of commitment, risk and opportunity. Exporting products or services is one of the most common of the intermediate market entry strategies. It is typically accomplished through authorized international channels of distribution. However, when significant price differences exist between markets, alternative, parallel channels of distribution are almost certain to arise. These parallel channels, often referred to as gray marketing, are generally legal but unauthorized distribution channels that create an alternative export market entry. After a review of the literature, a case study highlights these complex issues from the perspective of both manufacturer and parallel marketer. The case study provides a tool for evaluating theory and a basis for discussing this important alternative mode of market entry. The case and the discussion which follows also highlight the role of international trade shows as an important element of the marketing mix for entering many foreign markets.

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Reviving Traditions in Research on International Market Entry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-044-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Daniel C. Bello, David J. Urban and Bronislaw J. Verhage

Although instability characterises export channels, little researchhas examined the interfirm evaluations that are related to amanufacturer′s continued use of export…

Abstract

Although instability characterises export channels, little research has examined the interfirm evaluations that are related to a manufacturer′s continued use of export middlemen. In this research, a manufacturer′s evaluations of its international intermediary are divided into performance, dependence, and importance dimensions. Theoretical and empirical literatures are used to frame hypotheses linking each evaluative dimension to an aspect of the manufacturer′s channel design strategy. The results show that manufacturers′ evaluations of their middlemen are systematically related to the economic and organisational strategies used by manufacturers. The discussion draws important implications for managing the indirect export channel.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Rajiv Mehta, Trina Larsen, Bert Rosenbloom, Jolanta Mazur and Pia Polsa

Marketing channels exist in an increasingly competitive international and global environment. Consequently, many firms have reengineered their marketing channels systems…

Abstract

Marketing channels exist in an increasingly competitive international and global environment. Consequently, many firms have reengineered their marketing channels systems by placing greater emphasis on fostering higher levels of cooperation among international channel participants. However, there are relatively few studies that explore cross‐cultural issues in marketing channels. Thus, investigating whether cultural differences influence how channel participants react to a firm’s channel strategies is an important issue that needs to be addressed. This study comparatively examines channel leadership styles, cooperation, and channel member performance across three divergent national cultures. More specifically, the study seeks to assess whether employing uniform channel strategies produces similar responses from channel members in different countries. Using data drawn from a sample of automobile dealerships in the USA, Finland, and Poland, inconsistent results were found, which suggest that using leadership stylesto foster cooperation among channel members across different national cultures on a standardized basis is not an appropriate channel strategy. Based on the findings, international channel management implications, limitations, and directions for future research are proferred.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Rajiv Mehta, Alan J. Dubinsky and Rolph E. Anderson

As firms seek to prosper in a fiercely competitive global economy, cooperative inter‐firm alliances among members of the value chain are increasingly being forged. In the…

Abstract

As firms seek to prosper in a fiercely competitive global economy, cooperative inter‐firm alliances among members of the value chain are increasingly being forged. In the area of marketing channels, strategic alliances among international channel partners have become the norm as well. Thus, identification of inter‐firm influence strategies – such as different leadership styles – used by the channel captain to motivate international channel partners becomes increasingly important. More specifically, in administering a firm’s marketing channels, participative, supportive, and directive leadership styles may be effective in eliciting channel partners to exert higher levels of motivation, which, in turn, may be associated with higher levels of performance. The linkages among leadership styles, motivation, and performance are empirically examined on data drawn from a sample of automobile distributors in the USA, Finland, and Poland. International channel management implications are discussed, limitations of the study are identified, and directions for future research are suggested.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Nicholas C. Williamson and Daniel C. Bello

The instability of the relationships which Export Management Companies have with their Manufacturer‐Suppliers is, perhaps, the most pressing problem which the EMCs have in…

Abstract

The instability of the relationships which Export Management Companies have with their Manufacturer‐Suppliers is, perhaps, the most pressing problem which the EMCs have in their long‐term development as viable export marketing channel entities. Three different variables were empirically tested as possibly affecting the stability of EMC/M‐S relationships: (1) the “operating arrangement” which the EMC has with the M‐S; (2) whether or not the EMC “takes title” to products which it markets abroad; and (3) the size of a given M‐S's export sales generated by the EMC. All three variables were shown to affect the stability of the EMC/M‐S dyadic relationship.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2014

Chwo-Ming J. Yu, Hsiao-Wen Lin and Hui-Yun Chiu

In recent years, many firms from developing countries (LDCs) have engaged in foreign direct investment (FDI). Interestingly some of these firms locate their investments in…

Abstract

In recent years, many firms from developing countries (LDCs) have engaged in foreign direct investment (FDI). Interestingly some of these firms locate their investments in developed countries (DCs) (i.e., upstream FDI), instead of in countries economically similar to or less than their home countries (i.e., downstream FDI). However, only a few researchers have examined the issues related to upstream FDI. Furthermore, when examining FDI, most studies have focused on manufacturing subsidiaries but paid less attention to sales subsidiaries. Due to the differences in nature, management of manufacturing and sales subsidiaries should be different. Using a case study approach and focusing on the behaviors of Taiwanese firms, we address two research questions: (1) what are the channel strategies adopted by the sales subsidiaries of Taiwanese high-tech firms (i.e., multinational corporations (MNCs) from LDCs (LDCMNCs)) in DCs? and (2) how do these subsidiaries manage their channels in DCs? Our findings are: (1) LDCMNCs tend to use multiple sales channels, to work with large national distributors, and to adopt high touch channels to market products in DCs; (2) to reduce channel conflict, less powerful LDCMNCs tend to adopt multiple independent channel system, instead of dual channel system; and (3) due to limited resources, LDCMNCs make more effort on designing channel conflict prevention mechanisms than designing channel conflict resolution mechanisms, emphasize more on building relationships with distributors and tend to use financial incentives/high-power incentives than use other types of incentives to motivate distributors. The findings of this study are helpful for LDC firms to operate their sales subsidiaries more effectively in DCs.

Details

International Marketing in Rapidly Changing Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-896-9

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