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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Subramanian Shanmugasundaram

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between corporate governance practices and internationalization through foreign direct investments in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between corporate governance practices and internationalization through foreign direct investments in the context of family-owned business groups in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative case study method is used to understand the relationship between corporate governance practices and internationalization using four family-owned business groups in India.

Findings

The ownership concentration negatively influences the internationalization, while transparency has a positive association. Professionalization of management helps in internationalization. Overall, good corporate governance practices have a positive influence on group internationalization.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides detailed discussions based on the case study research which would help the future research work on the relationship between corporate governance practices and internationalization.

Originality/value

The existing literature studies in this field in the context of emerging markets are inconclusive. Hence, this paper uses the case study method to understand the relationship better.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Huynh Thi Thuy Giang and Luu Tien Dung

The purpose of the present study is to examine the direct impact of transformational leadership on non-family employee intrapreneurial behaviour and through a mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to examine the direct impact of transformational leadership on non-family employee intrapreneurial behaviour and through a mediating role of corporate adaptive culture and psychological empowerment in family-owned firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s sample consisted of 368 key role non-family employees at 109 family export and import firms in the Ho Chi Minh City of Vietnam. The data is analysed using a partial least square–structural equation model (PLS-SEM).

Findings

This paper shows that transformational leadership had a positive and significant influence on non-family employee intrapreneurial behaviour directly and via adaptive corporate culture and psychological empowerment as a mediating influence mechanism.

Practical implications

Family-owned firms might balance the need to maintain traditional core values and requires innovation through the development of human capital with non-family employee intrapreneurship.

Originality/value

This paper grants a unique approach to studying intrapreneurial behaviour in the context of the family-owned business.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2021

Michela Floris, Michela Marongiu, Cinzia Dessi and Angela Dettori

This study investigates the relationship between Total Quality Management (TQM) and internationalization in small family firms, focusing on the role that the dimensions of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between Total Quality Management (TQM) and internationalization in small family firms, focusing on the role that the dimensions of TQM may have as strategic resources to implement successful internationalization strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the Resource-Based View (RBV), the study is based on a single case study, and data were gathered through in-depth interviews with the family owner-manager.

Findings

Findings show that small family businesses that aim to operate in international markets have to invest constant attention toward TQM by developing strategies able to achieve excellence. More in detail, for small and medium family firms, TQM represents a driver to internationalize. Therefore, family-owned managers sustain that internationalization success depends on the increasing attention exhibited toward the following dimensions of quality, specifically on three main pillars: relationships, professionalization and long-term vision, which appear to be strategic resources in international markets. An interpretive model is proposed with a set of propositions.

Research limitations/implications

Scholarly implications are threefold. First, findings contribute to the RBV theory by introducing the long-term vision as a strategic resource able to activate a loop between TQM and internationalization success. Second, results contribute to TQM literature, highlighting that it represents a driver to internationalize, and following a long-term perspective, its enhancement is stimulated by internationalization. Third, findings contribute to family business studies, underlining the relevance done of owners on professionalization as a strategic resource to ensure excellence and obtain success in overseas markets. The main drawback refers to the fact that results stemmed from one single case study. Further studies could deepen the analysis on multiple cases.

Practical implications

The proposed case study represents a best practice and can stimulate other entrepreneurs and consultants to invest in TQM to thrive internationalization strategies.

Originality/value

The current study, elucidating that TQM is the driver to stimulate family business internationalization, proposes an interpretive model to study TQM and internationalization in small and medium family firms.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Veland Ramadani, Robert D. Hisrich, Grisna Anggadwita and Dini Turipanam Alamanda

This paper aims to identify the opportunities for them to manage this type of company within the Indonesian context.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the opportunities for them to manage this type of company within the Indonesian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper features descriptive multi-case analyses with a qualitative approach being used to gather and analyze data through in-depth interviews with several Indonesian family business owners having experience of succession.

Findings

The participation of women in family business management in several major Indonesian cities is quite extensive, especially for those who are highly educated. Similarly, the benefits of involving women in the management of family businesses are quite high because of their personal traits of patience, fastidiousness, tenacity and thriftiness. What is required is to provide wider access for Indonesian women to corporate management positions, broaden their participation in family businesses, secure a controlling role for women and increase women’s knowledge and skills so as to increase the benefit to family company management and its ability to face global competition.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework demonstrating the various stages of succession planning related to gender equality, which provide women with an opportunity to form the next generation of family business leaders is provided.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Isabel C. Botero, Claudia Binz Astrachan and Andrea Calabrò

Although prior research has indicated that ownership characteristics of a firm can influence how organizations are perceived, there is a gap in our understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although prior research has indicated that ownership characteristics of a firm can influence how organizations are perceived, there is a gap in our understanding of the general associations that individuals have with the term “family firm.” Some argue that promoting a firm as family-owned can result in positive evaluations by stakeholders; others argue that it can result in negative perceptions about a firm. However, very few empirical projects have directly explored the associations that external stakeholders have with the term “family firm.” The purpose of this paper is to explore the associations that individuals in Switzerland have with the term “family firm.”

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage study is conducted in this paper. In Stage 1 (n=138), the authors generated the list of associations that individuals had with the term “family firm.” The authors then categorized these associations into seven categories. In Stage 2 (n=321), the authors explored whether these associations were unique to family firms by asking participants in the “family firm” or the “publicly owned company” condition to assess which descriptors better represented the condition the characteristics of organizations in their conditions.

Findings

The findings indicate that there are seven general descriptor categories associated with the term “family firm.” These are: tradition and continuity, small and medium companies, trustworthiness, strong culture, corporate citizenship, professionalism, and career opportunities. The findings also indicate that individuals have different associations with the terms “family firm” and “publicly owned company.” While the term “family firm” is primarily associated with traditional, small, and trustworthy companies, the term “publicly owned company” is often associated with companies that are profit-oriented, large, and thought to offer superior career opportunities. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

Originality/value

This study continues to build our understanding of branding in family firms by helping us connect the term “family firm” with the direct associations in the mind of the audience. This is important because it can help practitioners and researchers better understand under which conditions promoting family firms will have a positive influence on consumers.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Stan Cromie, John Adams, Barbara Dunn and Renee Reid

Family firms account for around 75 per cent of all business enterprises in the UK, but there is a lack of research on these businesses. The family firms literature…

Abstract

Family firms account for around 75 per cent of all business enterprises in the UK, but there is a lack of research on these businesses. The family firms literature recognises that there are differences between family and non‐family businesses; differences that can be explained by conflicts between a juxtaposition of family values and business values. Consequently, family firms tend to have different approaches to ownership and control, the composition of boards, employment practices, strategy formulation and succession management. This paper reports on the demographic characteristics, ownership configurations, boardroom arrangements, managerial and succession practices of a random selection of 1,065 family firms located in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Results reveal that the firms are well‐established, privately owned, small businesses in which the lead family retains almost all shares and dominates the board of directors. These firms give some preferential treatment to family members in employment and managerial matters but business objectives are not ignored. In keeping with previous research, succession matters are not regularly discussed and much more needs to be done to allow for a smooth transition from one family generation to another. The authors conclude by arguing that there is an urgent need for policy makers to address the problems and needs of small family firms and to develop frameworks and practices for assisting these businesses.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Vanessa Ratten and Paul Jones

The purpose of this article is to highlight new directions that are needed in family business research particularly in light of the covid-19 pandemic and changing societal…

953

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to highlight new directions that are needed in family business research particularly in light of the covid-19 pandemic and changing societal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial is a review of the main issues discussed in the special journal issue regarding family businesses at the macro, meso and micro level. This approach enables a better understanding about the future research and practical implications for family business in the new economy characterised by substantial changes resulting from the covid-19 pandemic.

Findings

The findings suggest that family business studies need to incorporate new industry and societal contexts that have not previously been examined in sufficient detail in family business studies. This includes focusing more on the sport industry that is characterised by many family businesses.

Originality/value

This editorial for the special journal issue is amongst the first to discuss the role of the covid-19 crisis in impacting family business.

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Summer Brines, Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

Continued research around innovation within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) family businesses is needed to better understand the influence of specific resources…

3187

Abstract

Purpose

Continued research around innovation within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) family businesses is needed to better understand the influence of specific resources and capabilities that might promote and/or constrain entrepreneurial activities. The purpose of this paper is to develop an organising framework investigating SME family business innovation drawing on a Schumpeterian understanding of innovation as the introduction of new combinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Four guiding principles are developed and applied to an illustrative case study of an entrepreneurial family business that highlights the usefulness of complexity thinking for understanding innovation.

Findings

NZ Sock provides a rich illustrative case study to highlight how principles of complexity thinking along with Schumpeterian notions of innovation can usefully inform the authors’ understanding of entrepreneurial SME family businesses. The proposed guiding principles offered are borne out in application to the illustrative case example.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that complexity thinking and a Schumpeterian lens can usefully inform and extend the authors’ understanding of innovation within entrepreneurial SME family businesses. Further research would benefit from exploring the guiding principles proposed in other entrepreneurial SME family businesses to further substantiate this field of inquiry.

Practical implications

Principles of complexity thinking may provide additional understanding and insight for SME family business members needing to innovate and adapt to ever-changing operating environments.

Originality/value

Innovation is critical to the long-term survival and success of such firms; yet, to date little theoretical contribution and research has been offered in the field of innovation within the context of SME family businesses. Complex adaptive systems provide a lens from which to understand such businesses and that that a complexity framework helpfully allows attention to be given to such phenomena as emergence, adaptability and combinations through which innovation outcomes and processes may be understood. This paper offers four guiding principles that can be further tested and refined.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Raquel Meneses, Ricardo Coutinho and Jose Carlos Pinho

The purpose of this paper is to examine the successor's perceptions of the major objective and subjective factors as well as networks that facilitate or inhibit the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the successor's perceptions of the major objective and subjective factors as well as networks that facilitate or inhibit the process of internationalisation of entrepreneurial family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a qualitative methodological approach, the current study relies on case study evidence from a sample of six mature entrepreneurial family firms operating in different sectors.

Findings

Relying on data collected, this study found that the perception of foreign market opportunities; international vision; successor's proactivity; innovative spirit and specific technical knowledge are relevant variables that initiate the process of internationalisation of a family firm within the context of (post-) succession. By contrast, the study did not find high evidence of the importance of speaking a foreign language and educational background. The study also confirmed that a disrupted process, such as succession, may re-position a mature domestic family firm in international markets.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of this study relates to the sample size. Interpretation of these findings and their generalisation should therefore, be made with caution. In terms of future recommendations, an area that deserves particular attention relates to the development and transfer of social capital within family firms.

Originality/value

This study attempts to fill a gap in the literature, and it particularly tries to understand the successors’ perceptions regarding interrelationships between succession and internationalisation. The findings provide valuable insights for policy makers and managers.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Hanna Almlöf and Hans Sjögren

This study sheds light on a hitherto understudied group in family business literature: widows. We explore the roles a widow may take following the unexpected death of her…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sheds light on a hitherto understudied group in family business literature: widows. We explore the roles a widow may take following the unexpected death of her owner-manager spouse when she had no salient role in the business prior to the death.

Design/methodology/approach

We used a qualitative approach to research, to study inductively the roles considered and taken by three widows who unexpectedly succeeded as owners of Swedish privately held family firms. We conducted semi-structured interviews with widows and children in top management.

Findings

We construct a typology of four main roles a widow can take and analyse the underlying dimensions that they represent. We also analyse to which extent the choice of role widow can be explained by psychological ownership and double-loss theory. The typology can be used as a tool for family business owners and their advisors as the basis of an open and non-prejudiced discussion of the choices available to a widow.

Originality/value

We have investigated the factors that influence a widow's decision whether to take over the business or not, as suggested in previous research by, for example, Martinez et al. (2009). We explore the roles a widow can consider and adopt. The study advances our understanding of how businesses can remain as family firms also in the event of the unexpected death of an owner-manager (De Massis et al., 2008). We hereby contribute to the literature on sudden successions and on women in family businesses.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000