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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Francisco Espasandín-Bustelo, Juan Ganaza-Vargas and Rosalia Diaz-Carrion

This research explores how does the organizational culture influence internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions and the effect of these actions on the level of…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores how does the organizational culture influence internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions and the effect of these actions on the level of happiness of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts an employee perspective since the perception of employees is the unit of analysis. By relying on a sample of 921 workers of firms from different sectors and sizes headquartered in Spain, the empirical analysis is performed using partial least squares.

Findings

The findings evidence that clan and adhocracy cultures highly foster internal CSR practices and that internal CSR activities enhance employees' happiness. The mediating role of internal CSR in the relationship between organizational culture and employee happiness is also found. These results suggest that managers could play a proactive role in fostering internal CSR by designing the organizational culture according to features of clan and adhocracy cultures such as flexibility, innovation, creativity, autonomy, communication, training and support of supervisors.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on a single country, which makes it difficult to generalize the results and guides future research into cross-cultural analysis. Including countries that present differences in their cultural and institutional context would allow to explore the influence of the national context on the business culture, on internal CSR and on employee happiness. This work is also limited in time, as the data used are of a cross-cultural nature.

Practical implications

A greater effort in internal CSR by companies translates into a higher level of happiness for their workers. Specifically, occupational health and safety practices have the greatest influence on employee happiness. Hence, organizations must develop cultures that contribute to promote internal CSR—adhocracy and clan—since this would enhance employees' happiness if the values and beliefs that characterize these cultural configurations are translated into internal CSR practices such as occupational health and safety, work–life balance and equal opportunities.

Social implications

The improvement of employee happiness creates social value and can be enhanced through an organizational culture that promotes CSR. The research findings might be useful when defining institutional policies to promote job quality, as encouraged by the social policy agenda of the United Nations embodied in the Sustainable Development Goals.

Originality/value

Promoting internal CSR through organizational culture will have positive effects for companies internally by enhancing employees' happiness. Therefore, the article contributes to overcome the lack of evidence about the antecedents of internal CSR and its relationship with employees' happiness, an emerging variable in the management literature.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Nick Chandler, Balazs Heidrich and Richard Kasa

The purpose of this paper is to explore how organisational culture has changed between 2011 and 2016 in a higher education institution (HEI) that has been faced with both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how organisational culture has changed between 2011 and 2016 in a higher education institution (HEI) that has been faced with both significant internal and external changes. There are three areas to be examined: the change in culture on an organisational level, the demographic changes in the workforce, and the changes in values and perceptions of the workforce over time.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an explorative study and a repeated cross-sectional study of the organisation. The authors used the same methodology and approach for both the 2011 and 2016 studies, namely, the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument was used to ascertain respondents values and perceptions. The instrument was distributed in printed format to all members of staff and approval was received prior to distribution. Results were tested for significance using Cronbach’s α and ANOVAs.

Findings

There were demographic changes in the workforce primarily for age, occupation and tenure of staff, but little change in gender. Despite these changes in the workforce, on an organisational level perceptions and values have changed little over the five-year period, despite a multitude of external and internal developments. Although there were statistically significant differences between culture types and demographics (age, tenure, gender and occupation), there was no single demographic with a statistically significant difference for a particular culture type, either in values or perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The study questions the concept of organisational culture being affected by internal integration and external adaptation over time. Results indicate that culture is, by itself, either slow to react change, or does not react at all. A high response rate would be best for getting a clear picture of the culture of the organisation and a qualitative study is necessary (and planned) to develop the findings further, as well as triangulate the findings of this study.

Practical implications

This study should be of interest to practitioners as it presents the caveat that organisational culture of this study cannot be expected to change on its own, and highlights the need for a planned change process for the organisational culture to adapt to the changing needs of both the external and internal environments. The potential for resistance to change in this organisation appears is high and values and perceptions appear unrelated to any particular demographic.

Social implications

Although the authors cannot generalise from this longitudinal case study, the authors can consider some potential social implications, especially if further studies confirm the findings. First, despite government attempts to develop higher education in Hungary, staff perceptions and values within the institution are harder to change. Second, any attempts to revitalise the organisation from the inside (such as in this case with the forced retirement of older employees) seem unfruitful. Finally, the HEI is struggling to survive, and yet employees seem to not be a part of that struggle.

Originality/value

Although there are studies of organisational culture in HEIs, very few have undertaken a longitudinal approach. The study takes place in a unique situation: just before and just after extreme changes – both internally and externally – have taken place. Few studies question the organic and evolving nature of culture as it is difficult to predict when changes will occur. The study is in the unique position of having been able to do so.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Raka M. Bhaduri

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of organizational culture, leadership and crisis management through exploration of these three constructs with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of organizational culture, leadership and crisis management through exploration of these three constructs with respect to crisis management.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a conceptual framework has been proposed that is based on the literature findings of organizational culture, leadership and crisis management. Two types of cultural elements are used; internal versus external focus and low versus high flexibility. Organizational crisis management process is explained through the five-stage life cycle, including signal detection, prevention, damage containment, recovery and learning. Four types of leadership are included; directive, transactional, cognitive and transformational that are critical during crisis management. Five research propositions have been proposed for each stage of crisis management.

Findings

Five research propositions have been proposed based on the stages of crisis management.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework needs to be tested for validity. More research is needed on how changing demographics and technology affect these constructs. Organizations need to develop through reflective practices that focus on leadership competencies and crisis-prone culture to tackle any crisis event.

Practical implications

Organizations need to develop leadership competencies and crisis-prone culture. Organizations needs to be reflective on their practices.

Originality/value

The proposed conceptual framework is an expanded version of the crisis response leadership matrix (CRLM) model of Bowers et al. (2017). In this paper, an unique concept is presented by aligning leadership, culture and crisis management with respect to each stage of crisis management and types of crisis.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Isabel Sánchez Quirós

The paper proposes a model that will enable us to go deeper into the study of organizations, bringing forth a framework that will allow us to make many propositions…

Abstract

The paper proposes a model that will enable us to go deeper into the study of organizations, bringing forth a framework that will allow us to make many propositions explicit and thus provide a contrast to the alignment theory. We test the model in the Spanish hotel industry. We have been able to identify the internal processes and behavior that fit into each strategic pattern, which go deeper into the process of putting each strategy into practice (first objective: first set of hypotheses). Furthermore, the analysis of the internal processes and behavior that bring about the different degrees of effectiveness in each strategic type makes it possible to build or maintain the complementary nature of business strategy and internal process, and guarantee its success (second objective: second and third sets of hypotheses).

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

D.J. Wasmer and Gordon C. Bruner

Considers how recent concerns with service quality have led toincreased awareness of the importance of the role of the front‐lineemployee, the service provider. Describes…

Abstract

Considers how recent concerns with service quality have led to increased awareness of the importance of the role of the front‐line employee, the service provider. Describes how internal marketing has been instrumental in raising service providers′ performance. Develops a method, drawing on organizational literature, for identifying segments of the service organization which can be targeted by internal marketing. Argues that the service marketer should view employees as “customers” who can be analysed using marketing techniques, thereby enabling the enhancement of service quality. Includes detailed recommendations and an appendix.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Zhi Cao, Baofeng Huo, Yuan Li and Xiande Zhao

This study aims to bridge the gap in understanding the effects of organizational culture on supply chain integration (SCI) by examining the relationships between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to bridge the gap in understanding the effects of organizational culture on supply chain integration (SCI) by examining the relationships between organizational cultures and SCI. The extant studies investigating the antecedents of SCI focus mainly on environments, interfirm relationships and other firm-level factors. These studies generally overlook the role of organizational culture. The few studies that do examine the effects of organizational culture on SCI show inconsistent findings.

Design/methodology/approach

By placing organizational culture within the competing value framework (CVF), this study establishes a conceptual model for the relationships between organizational culture and SCI. The study uses both a contingency approach and a configuration approach to examine these proposed relationships using data collected from 317 manufacturers across ten countries.

Findings

The contingency results indicate that both development and group culture are positively related to all three dimensions of SCI. However, rational culture is positively related only to internal integration, and hierarchical culture is negatively related to both internal and customer integration. The configuration approach identifies four profiles of organizational culture: the Hierarchical, Flexible, Flatness and Across-the-Board profiles. The Flatness profile shows the highest levels of development, group and rational cultures and the lowest level of hierarchical culture. The Flatness profile also achieves the highest levels of internal, customer and supplier integration.

Research limitations/implications

This study is subject to several limitations. In theoretical terms, this study does not resolve all of the inconsistencies in the relationship between organizational culture and SCI. In terms of methodology, this study uses cross-sectional data from high-performance manufacturers. Such data cannot provide strong causal explanations, but only broad and general findings.

Practical implications

This study reminds managers to consider organizational culture when they implement SCI. The study also provides clues to help managers in assessing and adjusting organizational culture as necessary for SCI.

Originality/value

This study makes two theoretical contributions. First, by examining the relationships between organizational culture and SCI in a new context, the findings of the study provide additional evidence to reconcile the previously inconsistent findings on this subject. Second, by departing from the previous practice of investigating only particular dimensions of organizational culture, this study adopts a combined contingency and configuration approach to address both the individual and synergistic effects of all dimensions of organizational culture. This more comprehensive approach deepens our understanding of the relationship between organizational culture and SCI.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Charlotte Simonsson and Mats Heide

The purpose of this paper is to gain new knowledge of how organizational errors can be used to early detect signals of impending crises and thereby develop internal crisis…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain new knowledge of how organizational errors can be used to early detect signals of impending crises and thereby develop internal crisis communication. Three communication processes – organizational culture, leadership and learning – that are particularly important for the development of internal crisis communication are focused. The paper also discusses what kind of learning error management supports, and suggests how crisis communication as a practice can be developed. The thesis is that intensified work of improving internal crisis communication is a vital step of becoming a communicative organization, where all coworkers are understood and act as strategic communicators.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study is part of a three-year research project on internal crisis communication within a Swedish university hospital. This paper is based on a sub-study with 37 qualitative semi-structured interviews with nurses, physicians, managers and crisis management specialists within the hospital.

Findings

The paper offers knowledge about how internal crisis communication can be developed by focusing on errors as resource to anticipate a crisis and as material for organizational learning. Coworkers are mainly focused in the article and are seen as important sources and strategic communicators. It is further emphasized that error management is not a matter of technological solutions, but rather a question of communicative aspects of leadership and organizational culture.

Practical implications

It is suggested that initiatives to develop internal crisis communication is an important step for organizations in becoming communicative organizations, and communication professionals have an important role to facilitate this development.

Originality/value

This paper gives a new understanding of internal crisis communication and the importance of leadership and culture.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Seyedeh Khadijeh Taghizadeh, Syed Abidur Rahman, Md Mosharref Hossain and Md Masudul Haque

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of four organizational culture traits, consistency, cooperativeness, effectiveness and innovativeness, on radical and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of four organizational culture traits, consistency, cooperativeness, effectiveness and innovativeness, on radical and incremental type of service innovations, which leads to new service market performance (NSMP).

Design/methodology/approach

The data are collected through a cross-sectional survey of 171 bank managers in Bangladesh and analyzed through structural equation modelling using SmartPLS software.

Findings

The results reveal no impact of “consistency” as a cultural trait on “radical” and “incremental” service innovations. “Cooperativeness” and “innovativeness” impact incremental and radical service innovations positively. “Effectiveness” impacts radical service innovations positively. Radical and incremental service innovations impact NSMP significantly.

Practical implications

These findings add to the knowledge in terms of how organizational culture can make service innovations happen in the growing banking industry in a developing market.

Originality/value

The model links organizational culture traits (internal/external and flexibility/control focussed) with radical and incremental service innovation.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Elspeth N. Tilley, Susan M. Fredricks and Andrea Hornett

This article aims to report the results of an international survey (USA and New Zealand) that tested relationship effects on ethical behaviour. The findings point to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to report the results of an international survey (USA and New Zealand) that tested relationship effects on ethical behaviour. The findings point to the impact of perceived social bonds on ethical decision‐making. They also reinforce the cultural specificity of ethics. Both these findings confirm the importance of participatory, ground‐up, discussion‐based approaches to developing organisational ethical standards. The article discusses some implications of these findings for internal communicators involved with ethics programmes in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used an established scenario‐style survey to test respondents' ethical decision‐making behaviours under different circumstances.

Findings

This article discusses two results that will impact on internal communication approaches to stimulating ethical attitudes and behaviours: the positive influence on people making ethics‐related decisions of a perceived relationship with those affected by the decision, and cultural differences.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the functionalist, hypothetical, descriptive survey design which identifies responses but not motivations, and findings are limited to the specific scenarios described. The results show the importance of future research to elaborate connections between perceived relationships, ethics, and culture.

Practical implications

The paper offers practitioners a research method, which they can use to stimulate personal and group reflection among staff about ethical decision‐making and the different factors that can influence ethical choices. In confirming a connection between perceived relationships and choosing more ethical behaviour towards others, the findings may also reinforce the importance of internal relationship building as an important aspect of organisational investment in ethics‐related outcomes such as fraud reduction and reputation management.

Originality/value

The research provides evidence for some connections that have not previously been explored in the organisational context, between perceived relationships and ethical outcomes. It also confirms the cultural diversity of ethics, but shows that enhancing perceived relationships may help bridge cultural differences on ethical norms.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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