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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Donia M. Bettaieb and Reem F. Alsabban

Studies related to biophilic design (BD) have not clarified the user's role in applying its elements and features to improve quality of life (physical and mental health)…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies related to biophilic design (BD) have not clarified the user's role in applying its elements and features to improve quality of life (physical and mental health). This paper aims to highlight the users' role (experience, practice, and advice) when utilising aspects of BD in the interior environment of modern houses (MH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

A study of users' experiences was conducted through a qualitative approach by analysing semi-structured one-to-one interviews with a representative sample from Jeddah (12 heads of the family) using an adapted Biophilic Interior Design Matrix. An inductive approach was applied by extrapolating the users' role in employing BD elements in the MH's interior environment based on their experience in employing various biophilic elements.

Findings

The findings demonstrate the importance of the user's role when incorporating biophilic elements in living spaces. The levels of employment of BD elements of various kinds in the interior environment of the MH as a whole are considered high. A high percentage was observed regarding the availability of BD elements in the 40–59 years age group (87%), and a relationship was observed between housing type (villas vs apartments) and availability of BD elements. Additionally, a relationship was observed between the use of a professional designer when designing the house and the availability of biophilic elements. However, the sample did not have a grasp of several BD concepts. The application is generally made without knowing the positive impact on mental health. The user matrix was compiled as a reference that reflects the features and elements that are easily enjoyed in activating BD and enhancing the users' role in raising the level of BD in their homes. An initial classification of BD features was elaborated regarding the physical structure (PS) of a building, features regarding the user under control (UUC) and features regarding the user out of control (UOC).

Research limitations/implications

The classification was preliminarily based on PS, UUC, and UOC. Future research is required to confirm what has been communicated through advanced and in-depth research for housing analysis to confirm and enhance the user's role. This approach is a quick alternative solution to employ biophilic elements.

Originality/value

The authors focussed on the immaterial aspect of BD in interior spaces from the user's experience. BD-related studies have focussed on the physical aspect of architectural space.

Details

Open House International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2022

Beth McGee, Xu Jin, Nam-Kyu Park, Skylar Ball and April Carr

The Biophilic Interior Design Matrix (BID-M) was created to assist designers with identifying biophilic interior design features for optimizing nature integration for…

Abstract

Purpose

The Biophilic Interior Design Matrix (BID-M) was created to assist designers with identifying biophilic interior design features for optimizing nature integration for evidence-based design. The BID-M was developed and tested with interior design practitioners in the United States. There was a need to further develop the BID-M for other cultures along with understanding the designers' perceptions of biophilia.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used with 101 interior designers/architects practicing in China using a pre- and post-questionnaire surrounding a room assessment using the BID-M.

Findings

The Chinese translation of the BID-M was perceived as beneficial to design practice, evaluated as reliable and valid. The Chinese designers perceived a significant increase in knowledge and importance of biophilia after using the BID-M and it was useful in assisting all parts of the design process. The designers had some prior experience with biophilic design and clients have been requesting suitable natural and artificial light features.

Practical implications

The BID-M was seen as a human centered design tool that is useful to evaluate biophilic design features in the built environment.

Originality/value

Overall, the BID-M appears to be useful throughout the design process to ultimately support well-being. The participants' cultural background expands use of the BID-M and provides opportunities for additional cultural applications of biophilic design and future research. The BID-M offers additional language for incorporating biophilic design as well as serving to educate and guide feature selection.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2020

Hozan Latif Rauf, Kagan Gunce and Munevver Ozgur Ozersay

The study aims to identify the issues that restrict students to show their real performance in the design due to lacking of self-advocacy skills and suggesting a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to identify the issues that restrict students to show their real performance in the design due to lacking of self-advocacy skills and suggesting a new concept to overcome these difficulties.

Design/methodology/approach

The current literature was surveyed to form a comprehensive understanding of the issue. A case study has been taken for three years and two groups of students were taken. Results achieved and discussed.

Findings

The result of the study showed that those students who undergo an environment equipped with knowledge about self-advocacy can perform better and the success level is relatively higher amongst these students.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the current literature an original knowledge that has not been previously written about (empowering self-advocacy amongst students of interior architecture). The profession of interior architecture is a relatively new profession and faces challenges in fixing its feet on the ground that is why the subject can add a real value to it to alleviate the challenge.

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Johnnie Stark and Jin Gyu “Phillip” Park

This longitudinal study assessed student perceptions of sustainable design issues in the context of an accredited interior design program. Although literature exists…

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Abstract

Purpose

This longitudinal study assessed student perceptions of sustainable design issues in the context of an accredited interior design program. Although literature exists documenting the integration of sustainable strategies into interior design curriculum, more analysis is needed to determine the impact of program experiences on students’ attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

Over a four-year period, a questionnaire was administered to 245 freshmen in an introduction to interior design survey course and to 122 seniors enrolled in a professional practice in interior design seminar. In addition to statistically analyzing category responses between the two subject groups, the authors also looked for patterns in responses within each subject group.

Findings

Results indicated that the seniors were significantly more aware of the term “sustainable design” than the freshmen were. Understanding the students’ perceptions of more specific principles including life cycle thinking, environmentally and socially responsible materials sourcing and sustainable design practice required a more nuanced discussion. Although statistical significance of differences between the two groups was small to moderate throughout the survey categories, the seniors tended to be more deliberate in their responses.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to conduct a longitudinal investigation of an interior design student body from freshman through senior cohorts regarding perceptions of sustainable design. Findings from the large sample size provide direction for interior design programs and form the basis for further study.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Ulrich R. Orth, Frauke Heinrich and Keven Malkewitz

The personality impressions evoked by service environments play a key role in attracting and retaining customers. This paper explores the interior design of service and…

10303

Abstract

Purpose

The personality impressions evoked by service environments play a key role in attracting and retaining customers. This paper explores the interior design of service and retail environments, and links the designer perspective with the consumer perspective to assist managers in creating and managing interiors for achieving desired responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose and test a conceptual model that relates types of interior design to consumer impressions of that environment's personality. Two studies establish holistic types of interiors based on design elements and factors with a sample of professionals, and then link those types to generic impressions evoked with consumers.

Findings

Store personality relates systematically to five holistic types of interiors. Minimal‐shell interiors score high on unpleasantness, complex‐shell designs score high on enthusiasm, genuineness, and solidity, moderate‐shell interiors generate below‐average impressions of sophistication, genuineness, and solidity, low‐content interiors score high on enthusiasm and sophistication, and high‐content designs score low on enthusiasm, and high on unpleasantness.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to wine tasting rooms as an example category. Implications for interior design in general can be drawn from the holistic types of interiors identified and from basic relations to generic dimensions of consumer responses.

Practical implications

The findings reported in this research assist managers in more confidently using interior design for positioning and differentiating servicescapes.

Originality/value

Integrating the designer perspective with the customer perspective is a unique approach yielding taxonomy for servicescape interiors, and a holistic perspective on their links with personality impressions.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2021

Anas Atef Shamaileh

The emergence of COVID-19 pandemic in the late 2019 was accompanied by various consequences that included almost the entire life aspects worldwide. To cope with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of COVID-19 pandemic in the late 2019 was accompanied by various consequences that included almost the entire life aspects worldwide. To cope with the pandemic, imposing restricted measures was required, such as quarantine, lockdown and social distancing. The purpose of this paper is to identify the houses' interior designs responses in Jordan under Covid-19 Pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Under such conditions, people have to spend long periods inside their houses. This issue highlighted the importance and the vital role of houses interior design in meeting the various needs of residents under emergent and changing conditions.

Findings

This study revealed current and future responses that may be implemented to cope with the pandemic consequences in terms of houses’ interior design. Moreover, a conceptual model was proposed. Number of suggestions and further research were introduced considering the revealed findings.

Originality/value

This study aimed at identifying the houses’ interior design responses in Jordan under COVID-19 pandemic. The study methodology adopted both inductive and qualitative approaches to achieve its goals. Under the qualitative approach, semi-structured interviews were undertaken by interviewing ten interior designers and academics.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Sarah Boehm and Dak Kopec

This purpose of this paper is to promote the potential for utilizing interior designers as partners on multidisciplinary teams that deal with natural disaster recovery…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to promote the potential for utilizing interior designers as partners on multidisciplinary teams that deal with natural disaster recovery efforts. Interior design, an often-misunderstood profession, focuses on the health, safety and welfare of all who utilize interior spaces. Members of this profession bring a unique and relevant perspective to design and problem-solving.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-selecting international student design call supplied the data for illustrating how interior designers’ training prepares these multifaceted professionals to practice within diverse cultural contexts to create region-specific temporary housing units.

Findings

The designs submitted indeed, demonstrated an understanding of the holistic process necessary for creating effective temporary shelters.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the research is that the design call involved interior design students only. A broader invitation might also solicit entries from practicing interior design professionals.

Originality/value

The acknowledgement traditionally accorded interior designers as essential contributors to multidisciplinary disaster relief teams is tenuous at best. This paper suggests that interior designers have the potential to assume an important role in disaster relief planning and shelter creation. Attention must now be directed toward promoting a universal appreciation of the relevant skills training, and holistic perspectives of interior designers.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Chih-Chin Liang and Jia-Ping Lee

Due to the increasing awareness of the need to protect the environment, reverse logistics (RL) is being promoted to improve the ecological sustainability of production. RL…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the increasing awareness of the need to protect the environment, reverse logistics (RL) is being promoted to improve the ecological sustainability of production. RL can lower the costs of waste disposal, increase market competitiveness, and maintain a good corporate image. Hence, modern companies are focusing on environmental protection to demonstrate social responsibility. According to the OECD report of 2003, buildings consume 32 percent of resources, 12 percent of water, and 40 percent of energy worldwide, and the building waste comprises almost 40 percent of the all waste in the world. Therefore, controlling waste from the interior design sector may help slow global warming. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation models the current and new RL of disposing interior design waste in Taiwan. Modeling the carbon footprint (CF) of disposing interior design waste can help companies be aware of the environmental impact of disposing of waste, and how to improve it through RL. This investigation models the CFs of disposing interior design waste based on studies from Benjaafar et al. (2013), Pishvaee et al. (2009, 2010), and Tascione et al. (2014).

Findings

Analytical results showed that the RL significantly decreases the environmental impact of wastes. Companies can control carbon emission through the findings of this study and find how to improve their recycling process through RL.

Research limitations/implications

This study used the model proposed by Tascione et al. (2014) to develop an RL model for Taiwan. Whereas most studies in the literature analyze the carbon emissions from the comparison between cost and benefit, this study considered the logistics for the whole lifecycle of a product. The analytical results of this study reveal that that RL can reduce the environmental impact of wastes. This case study is the first to obtain results that can be extended to other countries. This study also reveals the importance of recycling plants that can process demolition waste for reuse.

Originality/value

This is the first study to model the RL based on literatures. The findings of this study can be extended to other cases.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Seobgyu Song, Courtney Suess, Makarand Amrish Mody and Tarik Dogru

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between two dimensions of servicescape (i.e. substantive and communicative servicescape), health care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between two dimensions of servicescape (i.e. substantive and communicative servicescape), health care travelers’ emotions, perceived value and word-of-mouth intentions. It also assesses the moderating effects of accommodation type (i.e. hotel and Airbnb) and interior design styles (i.e. traditional and modern) on the relationship between the two servicescape dimensions and travelers’ emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample from a survey of 692 health care travelers who stayed at either a peer-to-peer accommodation (i.e. Airbnb) or a hotel, a multi-step structural equation model analysis tested the relationships among variables. It examined the moderating effects of accommodation type and interior design style.

Findings

The relationships between servicescape, emotions, perceived value and word-of-mouth were significant. Also, the two moderators affected how servicescape influenced the emotions of health care travelers. For Airbnb guests, communicative servicescape had a more substantial effect on enhancing their positive emotions than hotel guests. For health care travelers who stayed at an accommodation with a traditional interior design style, in addition to enhancing positive emotions of health care travelers, substantive servicescape significantly reduced their negative emotions.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the need for the lodging industry to examine how health care travelers perceive and experience their accommodations with unique interior design characteristics. Also, stakeholders in the lodging industry should leverage the aspects of substantive servicescape in terms of relevant interior design styles, which, in turn, influence health care travelers’ positive word-of-mouth intentions. Given the increase in medical mobility and demand for accommodations by those traveling to receive health care services, understanding the lodging environment and how it affects travelers in this segment is essential.

Originality/value

This research develops a comprehensive servicescape model with a focus on the communicative dimension. Moreover, this study significantly contributes to the hospitality literature regarding how the core experience and various interior design styles influence a rapidly growing segment of health care travelers. Health care travelers’ emotions are essential to consider given the propensity to experience stress related to travel situational health factors.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sezin Tanrıöver, Zeynep Ceylanlı and Pınar Sunar

Architecture as a discipline has gone through a serious change since the post-war period and became a recognized profession focusing on human needs in the physical…

Abstract

Architecture as a discipline has gone through a serious change since the post-war period and became a recognized profession focusing on human needs in the physical environments. The issue of educating new practitioners for the transforming field has turned out to be the subject of a lively debate for the last 10-20 years.

The current position and approach in design studios of Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design of Bahçeşehir University, were thought to be worth putting forth and sharing with the design community to initiate a discussion for the future of the discipline in general. Consequently, this study was structured to present a paradigm in Interior Architecture Education by focusing on the case of Bahçeşehir University (BAU) Interior Architecture and Environmental Design Department design studio education. The four-year program consisting of eight academic semesters, is addressing the combination of two methods; namely, horizontally organized design studios (HODS), and vertically organized studio groups (VODS). Currently, this approach is subject to many discussions within the department due to many aspects. This approach was tested, evaluated and criticized through student and instructor comments collected via questionnaires. Results were collected and interpreted through three main issues of learning, teaching and assessment.

Study moving from general design studio education to the case of Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design of Bahçeşehir University, concludes with general comments, mentioning the lack of literature on design studio education, and the significance of sharing different approaches and applications. Lastly and specifically, the revisions following the completion of the experiment in the department was put forth. With reference to the case of BAU, initiating a discussion regarding current design studio education was intended.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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