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The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Article

Ariel Atzil and Eli Feinerman

– Enabling decision-makers in Israel to better assess the prospects of government policies aimed at changing inter-generation income distribution for the benefit of the retirees.

Abstract

Purpose

Enabling decision-makers in Israel to better assess the prospects of government policies aimed at changing inter-generation income distribution for the benefit of the retirees.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a comprehensive data set, the paper utilizes multivariate ordered-probit regression for empirical investigation of the motivations for support between parents and children in Israel.

Findings

The main finding is that child-parent support in Israel is usually driven by a combination of exchange and altruistic motives, rather than altruism alone.

Practical implications

Child-parent support will not reduce the impact of governmental policies aimed at redistributing income among different generations. If the Government of Israel raises the income level of its citizens aged 65 and over, the improvement in this population's condition will most probably be bigger than that caused directly by the amount the government has added to their income.

Originality/value

Empirical evaluation of the motivations for support given by children to their retired parents in Israel. Israel is a multicultural, immigrant country, home to people originating from all over the world, which provides an interesting cross-cultural perspective. In addition, the underlying database used in this study includes much more information than most databases utilized by earlier studies.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Michael Teffel

This case study aims to describe the efforts of the Kreisau‐Initiative (KI) Berlin to connect the field of international youth work with intergenerational approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to describe the efforts of the Kreisau‐Initiative (KI) Berlin to connect the field of international youth work with intergenerational approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The study describes three projects of the KI, illustrating the general background of the intergenerational projects, dissussing opportunities and challenges, and highlighting some of the implications for practitioners.

Findings

When offering international exchange projects for people of all ages, the paper has made one interesting finding. Generally speaking, it is more difficult to find younger people (aged 50 and younger) to take part in such activities than seniors. From this case study, the author learned that every project which aims to foster intergenerational dialogue needs a topic in which every participant (both young and old) is interested; it should be connected to them and to their daily lives. For organisations which would like to work both intergenerationally and internationally, it is difficult to obtain funding as there are only a few funds supporting international meetings for people of all ages.

Originality/value

The case study addresses intergenerational issues in international exchange projects.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article

Delphine Godefroit-Winkel, Marie Schill and Margaret K. Hogg

This paper aims to examine the interplay of emotions and consumption within intergenerational exchanges. It shows how emotions pervade the trajectories of grandmothers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the interplay of emotions and consumption within intergenerational exchanges. It shows how emotions pervade the trajectories of grandmothers’ relational identities with their grandchildren through consumption practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses qualitative data gathered via 28 long interviews with French grandmothers and 27 semi-structured interviews with their grandchildren. This study draws on attachment theory to interpret the voices of both grandmothers and their grandchildren within these dyads.

Findings

This study uncovers distinct relational identities of grandmothers linked to emotions and the age of the grandchild, as embedded in consumption. It identifies the defining characteristics of the trajectory of social/relational identities and finds these to be linked to grandchildren’s ages.

Research limitations/implications

This study elicits the emotion profiles, which influence grandmothers’ patterns of consumption in their relationships with their grandchildren. It further uncovers distinct attachment styles (embedded in emotions) between grandmothers and grandchildren in the context of their consumption experiences. Finally, it provides evidence that emotions occur at the interpersonal level. This observation is an addition to existing literature in consumer research, which has often conceived of consumer emotions as being only a private matter and as an intrapersonal phenomenon.

Practical implications

The findings offer avenues for the development of strategies for intergenerational marketing, particularly promotion campaigns which link either the reinforcement or the suppression of emotion profiles in advertising messages with the consumption of products or services by different generations.

Social implications

This study suggests that public institutions might multiply opportunities for family and consumer experiences to combat specific societal issues related to elderly people’s isolation.

Originality/value

In contrast to earlier work, which has examined emotions within the ebb and flow of individual and multiple social identities, this study examines how emotions and consumption play out in social/relational identity trajectories.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part

Fang Fang

Women perform the majority of household labour in many families around the world. However, the unequal division of household labour does not lead to dissatisfaction among

Abstract

Women perform the majority of household labour in many families around the world. However, the unequal division of household labour does not lead to dissatisfaction among women. In the present study, the author introduced the intergenerational household assistance to understand married women’s and men’s satisfaction with division of household labour in China, in addition to three major theoretical perspectives in studies of western families (i.e., relative resources, time availability, and gender role ideology). Logistic regression analyses on a nationally representative dataset (the Second Wave Survey of Chinese Women’s Social Status) were performed to study this topic. Consistent with studies in the West, the results show that relative resources, time availability, and gender ideology were associated with married Chinese women’s satisfaction, while married Chinese men’s satisfaction was only associated with time availability (the household labour done by them and their wives). Importantly, married women with parents-in-law’s household assistance tend to be more satisfied than those with help from their parents. The findings demonstrate that Chinese marriages are intertwined with intergenerational relationships and suggest that it is important to take into account of the influence of intergenerational relationships in studies of Chinese marriages.

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Article

Michele Coele

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that it should be possible to devise mechanisms which will enable communities to address the changing assistance needs of disabled…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that it should be possible to devise mechanisms which will enable communities to address the changing assistance needs of disabled and older residents whilst giving younger resident assistants an equity stake in the housing market. The existence of such mechanisms on a national scale would facilitate mobility between otherwise independent communities and maximise the choices available to residents requiring different forms of assistance at different stages in their lives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon the author's personal experience of exchanging accommodation with a team of assistants. The author considers how this model could be made more sustainable and replicable. Action research is needed to explore similar models within the context of intentional communities.

Findings

Two pressing social challenges could have a unified solution. Cohousing provides potential for people to remain within an intergenerational community as they grow older and develop assistance needs, while providing accommodation equity. Today's “baby boomer” generation may contribute to less advantaged future generations by leaving behind them dedicated housing for assistants in order to make sure that such provision is present within communities in perpetuity.

Originality/value

As a disabled person, the author had found it interesting to actively explore with younger people the impact upon both generations of issues around housing equity. The author has already, and would like to test further, the potential of nonmonetary exchange within intentional communities.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article

Bettina Becker and Jasmine Saville

This paper seeks to report on a project working with young and older people looking ahead to a more sustainable future and sharing practical skills.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report on a project working with young and older people looking ahead to a more sustainable future and sharing practical skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The project involved bringing young and older people together in two communities of Pembrokeshire. Three sessions in each community were facilitated in a flexible way to respond to the needs of the participants and were evaluated.

Findings

The project was successful in encouraging the participants to reflect on issues of sustainability. The exchange between the generations was most successful during the craft activities.

Social implications

The success of this project should encourage a widespread uptake of facilitated sessions to enable intergenerational skills exchange with a view to a more sustainable future. Further research into the long‐term impacts of such projects would also prove useful.

Originality/value

This case study shows a successful intergenerational project which could be replicated in other settings in a flexible way requiring very few resources.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article

Nancy Z. Henkin and Donna M. Butts

Intergenerational work has the potential to bring ages, races and cultures together to support policies and practices that help all individuals become productive citizens…

Abstract

Purpose

Intergenerational work has the potential to bring ages, races and cultures together to support policies and practices that help all individuals become productive citizens who use their skills and talents to contribute to the communities in which they live. It can promote values that foster a sense of interdependence, promote lifelong contribution, and increase a recognition of shared fate. Although the number and range of activities is growing, there still is a gap between the promise and the practice of intergenerational work. This article seeks to describe the history of intergenerational practice in the United States, to give examples of successful programs and initiatives, benefits and challenges, and opportunities for further growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The review is based on the authors' combined 50 years of intergenerational practice.

Findings

Intergenerational partnerships, programs and policies that promote reciprocity and interdependence are critical to the well‐being of the nation and the world. The United States has made great strides in bringing generations together to improve the quality of life for all. Much still needs to be done, however, to make this approach “business as usual” and to ensure that people of all ages work together for the common good – particularly in these challenging times.

Originality/value

The article gives an insight into the successes of intergenerational practice in the United States, based on the authors' work in this area.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Elmer Spreitzer, Robert Schoeni and K.V. Rao

The purpose of this study was to describe any patterns of distinctive sociocultural adaptation in the form of exchanges of time and money between American households, and…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe any patterns of distinctive sociocultural adaptation in the form of exchanges of time and money between American households, and to determine whether any observed racial or ethnic differences remain after controlling for social background characteristics. We tested one dimension of the sociocultural adaptation hypothesis — Through processes of distinctive sociocultural adaptation, minority group members learn to survive by adjusting behaviors, values, and informal organization in response to demands and stressors in their social environment. The focal adaptation in our study involved instrumental and expressive exchanges between households. The findings showed that minority groups on average were less likely to participate in instrumental and expressive exchanges between households as compared to the majority group. The study involved a secondary analysis of data collected in 1987–1988 as part of the National Survey of Families and Households (N= 13,017). Logistic regression was used to test for racial and ethnic variations in a multivariate context.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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