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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Peter W. Stonebraker

The key to effective management in times of tumult is organisation fit — the integration or congruence of the organisation. Tumult increases the need to manage the two…

Abstract

The key to effective management in times of tumult is organisation fit — the integration or congruence of the organisation. Tumult increases the need to manage the two major areas of fit more closely — organisation domain and external environment. Fit must be considered with equal emphasis in the short, mid and long term. An on‐going, strategic assessment of organisational fit is needed. The nature of the change process and the change variables must be identified. There are six ways that management can intervene between change variables to enhance their fit and four organisation interfaces which are directed towards adaptation to the external environment. This multi‐level change typology identifies three methods of directly managing organisation fit — intrusion, interface and intervention. These methods are discussed and interventions and interfaces described.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Yannis Steffen Oetken, Christian Hofstadler and Felix Meckmann

The individual levels involved in real estate management are thoroughly discussed in the literature. This paper provides a structured meta-analysis of the different…

Abstract

Purpose

The individual levels involved in real estate management are thoroughly discussed in the literature. This paper provides a structured meta-analysis of the different theoretical approaches in German-speaking countries. It also investigates the integration of transaction management and technical due diligence into the concepts of organisation theory. In this process, the interfaces are analysed and optimised models are developed for transferring the technical due diligence findings to the operational level.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with transaction management experts were conducted based on a narrative literature review. These interviews shed light on how the components of transaction management and due diligence are integrated into the transaction process, with a particular focus on technical due diligence. They also provide insights into how the related results are taken into account in relation to the transaction, and how they are transferred into the operational phase.

Findings

It becomes apparent that the role of transaction management is not clearly defined and delimited in the structural model of the real estate industry. Technical due diligence findings are usually transferred to the operation of the property via several, manual interfaces with corresponding losses of knowledge. The related models derived and developed for the purpose of operational optimisation define the role of transaction management against a technical background and identify the interfaces to be considered.

Practical implications

The significance of transaction management for subsequent operations is discussed and elaborated on. More specifically, transferring safety-relevant, high-priority findings from the technical due diligence exercise plays a crucial role for the modelling stage. On the implementation level, the derived models serve as a basis for customising the internal organisational structure.

Originality/value

In Germany, there has hardly been any research into the involvement of technical experts in the real estate transaction process to date. This paper provides initial approaches to optimising organisational structures and sustainably integrating technical due diligence findings into real estate operations.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Margherita Pero and Lucio Lamberti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the marketing‐supply chain management (SCM) interface in new product development (NPD) processes through a contingent approach.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the marketing‐supply chain management (SCM) interface in new product development (NPD) processes through a contingent approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The study endorses Thompson's taxonomy of interfaces – pooled interdependence, sequential interdependence and reciprocal interdependence – to classify the approaches observed through case study research on two innovation processes within the same unit. A number of contingent variables is hypothesized as possible factors impacting on the very interface adopted by the company. Thompson's taxonomy and the contingent variables constitute the conceptual framework of the study.

Findings

Results show that the conceptual framework provides encouraging results in interpreting the marketing‐SCM interface design by companies, even if some refinements, especially as far as the interface taxonomy are concerned, appear necessary to provide a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

Since the study is based on two cases, outcomes cannot be generalized. Nonetheless, the preliminary results and the rich understanding of the phenomenon provided by the in‐depth case studies suggested a number of research proposition to frame future research on the topic.

Originality/value

The paper observes the marketing‐SCM interface in a contingent way, providing a new interpretive framework for its analysis and design, and showing how the encouraged view in literature towards marketing‐SCM integration may be problematic and counterproductive in specific circumstances.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Edward A. Morash, Cornelia Dröge and Shawnee Vickery

Investigates performance relationships for interfunctional process integration and specific logistics interface capabilities. The results indicate that competitive…

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1637

Abstract

Investigates performance relationships for interfunctional process integration and specific logistics interface capabilities. The results indicate that competitive advantage is more likely to emanate from interfunctional process integration than individual function (sub) optimization. Also identifies logistics’ unique role as a boundary‐spanning interface between marketing, production, and new product development, as a potential source of competitive advantage. In terms of overall business performance, logistics followed by new product development are shown to have the greatest impact on profitability and growth. Further, logistics interface capabilities of customer service and logistics quality have the greatest independent impacts on business performance. In total these results imply that logistics, new product development, and demand‐management capabilities may provide firms with that extra competitive edge which shows up in “bottom line” performance. States that the relatively neglected areas of logistics boundary spanning and production customer service also deserve attention.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Edward A. Morash, Cornelia Dröge and Shawnee Vickery

Investigates performance relationships for interfunctional process integration and specific logistics interface capabilities. The results indicate that competitive…

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2950

Abstract

Investigates performance relationships for interfunctional process integration and specific logistics interface capabilities. The results indicate that competitive advantage is more likely to emanate from interfunctional process integration rather than individual function (sub) optimization. Logistics’ unique role as a boundary spanning interface between marketing, production, and new product development, is also identified as a potential source of competitive advantage. In terms of overall business performance, logistics followed by new product development are shown to have the greatest impact on profitability and growth. Further, logistics interface capabilities of customer service and logistics quality have the greatest independent impacts on business performance. In total, these results imply that logistics, new product development, and demand‐management capabilities may provide firms with that extra competitive edge which shows up in “bottom‐line” performance. States that the relatively neglected areas of logistics boundary spanning and production customer service also deserve attention.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

P. Mandal and B. Baliga

This paper describes a framework in developing MIS‐user interfaces to highlight how generic management information systems can be made more useful to managerial decision…

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1813

Abstract

This paper describes a framework in developing MIS‐user interfaces to highlight how generic management information systems can be made more useful to managerial decision making. The suggested framework has been implemented in a medium‐sized job shop manufacturing company. Object‐oriented programming technology is used to provide flexible access to information stored by a generic MIS, namely ManuSoft. To improve the usefulness of the MIS, 20 interfacing programs relating to the information requirements at operational, planning and strategic levels have been developed and implemented. For purposes of illustration, three such programs have been described in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Steffen Muxoll Bastholm and Kristin B. Munksgaard

The strategic importance of the purchasing function increases, as its task become more dynamic in various interfaces with different suppliers. Changes in these…

Abstract

Purpose

The strategic importance of the purchasing function increases, as its task become more dynamic in various interfaces with different suppliers. Changes in these customer–supplier interfaces pose specific challenges. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the purchasing function handles the interplay of interface changes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a qualitative single case study design. Data are collected through observations and interviews conducted before, during and after a concrete change of interface taking place between a buying firm and its suppliers and customers.

Findings

Three main findings are identified to redefine the tasks of the purchasing function. The first concerns the new ways of defining the purchasing tasks. The main issue is to balance tasks with the simultaneous changes influencing other interfaces and relationships. The second is the division and alignment of tasks in intra- and inter-organizational networks with regards to who decides and coordinates what. Third, the inter-connected performance relates to how other actors perform their tasks. For the purchasing function, managing supplier interfaces influences and is influenced by how the firm simultaneously manages its user interface.

Practical implications

For management, a new way to evaluate the performance of the purchasing function is needed by including relationship management and interactive capabilities.

Originality/value

This study contributes with new insights into how managing the dynamics of changing interfaces requires interactively defined purchasing tasks, division and alignment of tasks and inter-connected performance vis-à-vis others in the wider network setting.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2017

Lars-Erik Gadde and Finn Wynstra

In a relationship both sides are important for the development. This is one reason why purchasing has always been as central as marketing in the empirical studies in IMP…

Abstract

In a relationship both sides are important for the development. This is one reason why purchasing has always been as central as marketing in the empirical studies in IMP. The manner in which the features of business networks affect the role of purchasing and the roles of the suppliers and supply management is here in focus. The existence and importance of business relationships have normative consequences for purchasing that are very distinct and break clearly with some of the traditional normative recommendations for purchasing. The authors believe that ‘buying organisations increasingly need to develop interactive interfaces with their suppliers. One reason is that collaborative innovation and therefore the development role of PSM (purchasing and supply management) is becoming more important’. The conclusion is clear: If the buying organisations want to get more out of the suppliers than the supply of a standard product at a certain price, they have to engage in a more extensive interaction and develop a broader and closer business relationship that must be properly managed. That implies giving up some autonomy and accepting dependence on suppliers as developmental partners.

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Kristina Säfsten, Glenn Johansson, Nicolette Lakemond and Thomas Magnusson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of challenges related to interfaces in industrial innovation processes, together with suggestions on how…

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1408

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of challenges related to interfaces in industrial innovation processes, together with suggestions on how these interface challenges can be managed. The paper investigates similarities and differences between the interfaces and identified challenges in terms of required managerial issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The result presented in this paper is based on in-depth case studies of ten product development projects from five different manufacturing firms in Sweden. The empirical results are supplemented with results from a review of relevant literature.

Findings

To manage the interface challenges market uncertainty, technological uncertainty, product complexity and/or degree of change in product, production complexity and/or degree of change in production, geographical and/or organisational dispersion between technology development and product development, and between product development and production, it was found that several issues have to be considered. Most of the identified managerial issues concern transfer synchronisation, transfer management and transfer scope. The authors have shown that despite many differences between the different phases in the innovation process, a quite concordant picture emerges when it comes to how to manage interface challenges.

Practical implications

The classification of managerial issues into transfer synchronisation, transfer management and transfer scope provides an overview of areas that need to be addressed to manage interface challenges during the industrial innovation process. This knowledge provides some guidance for managers aiming at a smooth transition process, from technology development to production.

Originality/value

By addressing both the interface between technology development and product development, and between product development and production in the same study, the authors have been able to provide a comprehensive overview of managerial issues related to interfaces challenges in industrial innovation processes in manufacturing firms.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Kenneth Le Meunier‐FitzHugh and Nigel F. Piercy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sales and marketing interface and to identify some of the elements that may influence collaboration between sales and marketing…

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5889

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sales and marketing interface and to identify some of the elements that may influence collaboration between sales and marketing and provide a framework demonstrating how these elements may interrelate.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the sales and marketing relationship through qualitative research using one‐to‐one, tripartite interviews with senior executives and sales and marketing managers of three, UK‐based business‐to‐business organizations.

Findings

The paper indicates that there are two types of factor that affect collaboration between sales and marketing. Those that are out of the control of sales and marketing staff – management attitudes to coordination, interdepartmental culture and structure and orientation, and four that are internal to the interface – inter‐functional conflict, communications, market intelligence and learning. The paper also identifies that senior managers play a critical role in influencing this interface.

Research limitations/implications

Improving collaboration in the sales and marketing interface should be a focus for senior managers. The paper is limited by the number of cases.

Practical implications

The factors identified may be used by organizations to improve collaboration between sales and marketing.

Originality/value

The identification of factors that may improve collaboration between sales and marketing, and provide a conceptual framework for further study. The paper increases the understanding of the sales and marketing interface by identifying two additional factors that may influence the interface – learning and market intelligence, and demonstrates how the various factors may interrelate to create improved collaboration.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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