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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Fred Stoss, John Scialdone, Lola Olsen, Anne O'Donnell, Janet Wright, Eliot Christian, Roberta Balstad Miller, Gerald S. Barton, Walter Bogan, Barbara Rodes and Diane Harvey

What follows is a small sampling of activities that are underway. All of them are working toward contributing to the understanding of the Earth system.

Abstract

What follows is a small sampling of activities that are underway. All of them are working toward contributing to the understanding of the Earth system.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Jane Lewis, Jane Greenstock, Kim Caldwell and Beth Anderson

The wider research literature indicates that health professionals’ ability to identify possible child maltreatment varies, and that this can lead to under-reporting of…

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2277

Abstract

Purpose

The wider research literature indicates that health professionals’ ability to identify possible child maltreatment varies, and that this can lead to under-reporting of possible maltreatment to local authority (LA) statutory child protection agencies. The purpose of this paper is to understand how acute trust paediatric and LA services work together in suspected cases of child maltreatment, and what is viewed locally as good practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach, consisting of an online survey, qualitative case studies and good practice examples, was used to describe key features of current practice in joint working between acute trusts and LA services, and to generate insights that could help improve practice.

Findings

Holistic assessment and information gathering, supported by training and expert input, were identified as being critical to a comprehensive approach to identifying maltreatment. Both in-hospital and community-based social work arrangements can be effective bases for joint working in respect of child maltreatment. Effective joint working relies on shared vision and values, and investment in, and commitment to, collaborative working.

Research limitations/implications

This study covered arrangements in emergency departments (EDs) and maternity departments only, so future research could usefully look more broadly within acute care settings. Study respondents were also limited to safeguarding leads so, in future, there would be real value in exploring the experiences, practices and views of frontline practitioners.

Practical implications

The study includes practical implications for hospital and social work teams working to safeguard children.

Originality/value

The study highlights the characteristics of effective liaison between acute trust maternity and EDS and social work teams.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2014

Rebecca Gamiz and Abenet Tsegai

The purpose of this paper is to look beyond the data and findings of a joint practitioner-research project to illustrate how joint practitioner-research can influence…

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786

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look beyond the data and findings of a joint practitioner-research project to illustrate how joint practitioner-research can influence practice and stimulate meaningful partnership working from the bottom up within a social care setting. The impact of this integrated approach to practice and learning can enable improved outcomes for people.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors outline the research and explore the reflective process underlying the project including the subsequent phase of implementation. This examines what the authors, as practitioner-researchers, understood from the practice, heard from carers and fellow workers, and learnt from each other.

Findings

The authors consider the project in the wider context of evidence-based practice. Key enablers and challenges are identified to the production of joint practitioner-research and more broadly to outcomes for carers. The authors also examine the reflective process of joint working between individuals and the impact this can have on facilitating integrated working, at both a practice and service level.

Originality/value

The learning from this project evidences the value of meaningful joint working between practitioners and the impact this can have at different levels of integration. It also looks beyond the practitioner-research project to the stages of implementing findings and planning for ongoing joint working. It is therefore pertinent to many organisations looking to integrate and orientate towards a focus on outcomes for people.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Hye-Jin Paek, Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam, Sookyong Kim, Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, Nora J. Rifon and Mira Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child…

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2070

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study integrates three different sources of data, first, characteristics of the audience from internet audience measurement metrics; second, an analysis of food advergame content; and third, an analysis of the dietary quality of the foods in advergames.

Findings

The results show that 83.2 percent of the total 143 advergames are sponsored by CFBAI participating companies and 79.5 percent of the total 44 advergames reaching children are sponsored by those companies. About 87 percent of the advergames reaching children do not include age limit specification. By contrast, about 71 percent of the advergames reaching children include ad breaks and about half of the advergames reaching children include healthy lifestyle information. Compared to the total, advergames reaching children seem to have a higher level of brand integration. Moreover, most foods that the advergames promote are classified as unhealthy. Finally, the results show that ad breaks and number of brand identifiers are the two significant predictors of food advergames with child unique visitors.

Originality/value

Despite the increased attention to and scrutiny of innovative and interactive food marketing targeting children, little is known about the extent to which such techniques actually reach children, nor about the content and nutritional quality of foods they promote. This study attempts to fill in the gap by focussing on food advergames.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Sarah Stewart

This paper aims to shed light on the complex multiplicity of domestic violence interagency work. It proposes a new conceptualisation that reflects the entangled nature of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to shed light on the complex multiplicity of domestic violence interagency work. It proposes a new conceptualisation that reflects the entangled nature of professional practice and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The research on which this paper draws is an ethnographic study of practice in an integrated local domestic violence initiative. Data include focussed workplace observations, semi-structured interviews and key documents. The study draws on practice-based sociomaterial approaches and the conceptual framework, and methodology is informed by actor-network theory, in particular, the work of Annemarie Mol.

Findings

Findings suggest that interagency work that starts from the victim and traces threads of connection outwards is able to “hang together” as “practice multiple” in integrated service provision. I argue that the learning that happens in these circumstances is a relational effect and depends on who and what is assembled in the actor-network.

Research limitations/implications

The research has significant implications for framing understandings of domestic violence interagency work, as it firmly anchors “working together” to victims. Findings are expected to be of interest not only to practitioners, educators and researchers but also to policymakers.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a current gap in the literature, applies a novel research approach and proposes a new conceptualisation of domestic violence interagency work.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Sarah Hean, Elisabeth Willumsen and Atle Ødegård

Effective collaboration between mental health services (MHS) and criminal justice services (CJS) impacts on mental illness and reduces reoffending rates. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective collaboration between mental health services (MHS) and criminal justice services (CJS) impacts on mental illness and reduces reoffending rates. This paper proposes the change laboratory model (CLM) of workplace transformation as a potential tool to support interagency collaborative practice that has potential to complement current integration tools used in this context. The purpose of this paper is to focus specifically on the theoretical dimension of the model: the cultural historical activity systems theory (CHAT) as a theoretical perspective that offers a framework with which interactions between the MHS and CJS can be better understood.

Design/methodology/approach

The structure and rationale behind future piloting of the change laboratory in this context is made. Then CHAT theory is briefly introduced and then its utility illustrated in the presentation of the findings of a qualitative study of leaders from MHS and CJS that explored their perspectives of the characteristics of collaborative working between MHS and prison/probation services in a Norwegian context and using CHAT as an analytical framework.

Findings

Leaders suggested that interactions between the two services, within the Norwegian system at least, are most salient when professionals engage in the reintegration and rehabilitation of the offender. Achieving effective communication within the boundary space between the two systems is a focus for professionals engaging in interagency working and this is mediated by a range of integration tools such as coordination plans and interagency meetings. Formalised interagency agreements and informal, unspoken norms of interaction governed this activity. Key challenges limiting the collaboration between the two systems included resource limitations, logistical issues and differences in professional judgments on referral and confidentiality.

Originality/value

Current tools with which MHS/CJS interactions are understood and managed, fail to make explicit the dimensions and nature of these complex interactions. The CLM, and CHAT as its theoretical underpinning, has been highly successful internationally and in other clinical contexts, as a means of exploring and developing interagency working. It is a new idea in prison development, none as yet being applied to the challenges facing the MHS and CJS. This paper addresses this by illustrating the use of CHAT as an analytical framework with which to articulate MHS/CJS collaborations and the potential of the CLM more widely to address current challenges in a context specific, bottom-up and fluid approach to interagency working in this environment.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Grant Drawve, Leslie W. Kennedy, Joel M. Caplan and James Sarkos

The purpose of this study is to identify potential changes in crime generators and attractors based on monthly models in a high-tourist destination.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify potential changes in crime generators and attractors based on monthly models in a high-tourist destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A risk terrain modeling approach was used to assess spatial relationships between 27 crime generator and attractor types in Atlantic City, New Jersey with robbery occurrence for the 2015 calendar year. In total, 12 separate monthly models were run to identify changes in risk factors based on the month of the year.

Findings

Results indicated unique significant risk factors based on the month of the year. Over the warmer and summer months, there was a shift in environmental risk factors that falls in line with more of a change in routine activities for residents and tourists and related situational contexts for the crime.

Practical implications

The analytical approach used in the current study could be used by police departments and jurisdictions to understand types of crime generators and attractors influencing local crime occurrence. Subsequent analyses were used by Atlantic City Police Department to direct place-based policing efforts.

Originality/value

With growing crime and place research that accounts for temporal scales, the authors advance these endeavors by focusing on a tourist destination, Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Suzy Braye, David Orr and Michael Preston‐Shoot

The purpose of this article is to report the findings from research into the governance of adult safeguarding policy and practice in England, with particular focus on…

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2574

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to report the findings from research into the governance of adult safeguarding policy and practice in England, with particular focus on interagency partnership arrangements expressed through Safeguarding Adults Boards.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised a systematic search and thematic analysis of English‐language literature on adult safeguarding governance, a survey of Safeguarding Adults Board documentation, and key informant interviews and workshops with professionals involved in adult protection.

Findings

The effectiveness of adult safeguarding governance arrangements has not been subject to prior formal evaluation and thus the literature provided little research‐led evidence of good practice. The survey and workshops, however, revealed a rich and complex pattern of arrangements spanning a number of dimensions – the goals and purpose of interagency working, the structures of boards, their membership, chairing and rules of engagement, their functions, and their accountabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The research focus here is England, and thus does not incorporate learning from other jurisdictions. Whilst the research scrutinises the extent to which Boards practise empowerment, service users and carers are not directly involved in the fieldwork aspects of this study. In view of the absence of outcomes evidence identified, there remains a need to investigate the impacts of different forms of governance.

Practical implications

Drawing on this research and on governance frameworks in the context of related interagency fields, the article identifies standards to benchmark the approach to governance taken by Safeguarding Adult Boards.

Originality/value

The benchmarking framework will enable Safeguarding Adults Boards to audit, evaluate, and further develop a range of robust governance arrangements.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Arthur D. Middlemiss and Nishi Gupta

This paper aims to illustrate by example the value of interagency cooperation between US and international law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

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1171

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate by example the value of interagency cooperation between US and international law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

Design/methodology/approach

General review of post‐9/11 criminal cases brought by the Manhattan District Attorney's Office and other parts of the US law enforcement community that involved cooperation between US domestic and international law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

Findings

Finds that confrontation of multi‐jurisdictional crime requires domestic and international interagency cooperation; efforts to promote cooperation between domestic and international law enforcement and regulatory agencies have produced positive results post 9/11 and like efforts should be encouraged.

Originality/value

The paper provides case studies evidencing the benefit of law enforcement interagency cooperation.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2006

Susan Page Hocevar, Gail Fann Thomas and Erik Jansen

Recent events such as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 against the United States and the national disaster of Hurricane Katrina demonstrated the acute need for…

Abstract

Recent events such as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 against the United States and the national disaster of Hurricane Katrina demonstrated the acute need for interagency collaboration. Using a semi-inductive method, we conducted two studies with senior homeland security leaders to learn more about organizations’ collaborative capacity during the early planning stages. In study One, we used an interorganizational systems perspective to identify factors that create or deter effective collaboration. Study Two elicited vignettes from a second group of senior homeland security leaders to gain further insights into the ways in which their organizations are successfully building collaborative capacity.

Details

Innovation through Collaboration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-331-0

1 – 10 of over 1000